Registration No. 333-259826

     

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
____________________________

POST-EFFECTIVE AMENDMENT NO. 1
to
FORM F-1
REGISTRATION STATEMENT
UNDER
THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

____________________________

Cellebrite DI Ltd.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

____________________________

State of Israel

 

7372

 

Not applicable

(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

 

(Primary Standard Industrial
Classification Code Number)

 

(I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)

Cellebrite DI Ltd.
94 Shlomo Shmelzer Road
Petah Tikva 4970602, Israel
+972-(73) 394-8000

(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of registrant’s principal executive offices)

____________________________

Cellebrite, Inc.
795 Franklin Ave #4
Franklin Lakes, New Jersey 07417
(201) 848-8552
(Name, address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)

____________________________

Copies of all correspondence to:

Colin J. Diamond
Scott Levi

White & Case LLP
1221 Avenue of the Americas
New York, New York 10020
-1095
Tel: +1 (212) 819
-8200

 

Tali Sealman
White & Case LLP
3000 El Camino Real
2 Palo Alto Square, Suite 900
Palo Alto,
California 94306
Tel: +1 (650) 213 0300

 

Raanan Lerner
David S. Glatt
Shachar Hadar
Elad Ziv
Meitar | Law Offices
16 Abba Hillel Road
Ramat Gan, 5250608, Israel
Tel: +972 (3) 610
-3100

____________________________

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public: From time to time after this Registration Statement becomes effective.

If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933 check the following box: 

If this form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. 

If this form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. 

If this form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is an emerging growth company as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act of 1933. Emerging growth company 

If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act. 

____________

†        The term “new or revised financial accounting standard” refers to any update issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to its Accounting Standards Codification after April 5, 2012.

The registrant hereby amends this registration statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this registration statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or until this registration statement shall become effective on such date as the Securities and Exchange Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

 

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EXPLANATORY NOTE

On September 27, 2021, the registrant filed a Registration Statement on Form F-1 (Registration No. 333-259826), which was subsequently declared effective by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on October 6, 2021 (“Registration Statement”).

This post-effective amendment is being filed to update the Registration Statement to (i) include information contained in the registrant’s annual report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021, filed with the SEC on March 29, 2022, and (ii) to update certain other information in such Registration Statement.

No additional securities are being registered under this post-effective amendment. All applicable registration fees were paid at the time of the original filing of the Registration Statement.

 

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PROSPECTUS

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED MARCH 30, 2022

CELLEBRITE DI LTD.

171,729,210 Ordinary Shares
9,666,667 Warrants to Purchase Ordinary Shares
29,666,667 Ordinary Shares Underlying Warrants

This prospectus relates to the offer and sale from time to time by the selling securityholders named in this prospectus (the “Selling Securityholders”) of (A) 30,000,000 of our Ordinary Shares, par value of NIS 0.00001 per share (“Ordinary Shares”), purchased in a private placement in connection with our Merger, (B) up to 13,500,000 Ordinary Shares issued to TWC Tech Holdings II, LLC (the “Sponsor”) and affiliates in connection with the consummation of the Business Combination (as defined below) in exchange for Class A common stock, par value $0.0001 per share (the “TWC Class A Common Stock”) of TWC Tech Holdings II Corp, a Delaware corporation (“TWC”), (C) 128,229,210 Ordinary Shares held by certain holders that were shareholders of record of the Company prior to the consummation of the Business Combination (as defined below) and (D) warrants to purchase up to 9,666,667 Ordinary Shares (the “Warrants”) held by the Sponsor following the consummation of the Business Combination as a result of the exchange of warrants to purchase TWC Class A Common Stock for the Warrants. In addition, this prospectus relates to the issuance by us of up to 20,000,000 Ordinary Shares that are issuable by us upon the exercise of the Public Warrants (as defined below), which were previously registered, and up to 9,666,667 Ordinary Shares underlying Private Warrants (as defined below).

The Selling Securityholders may offer, sell or distribute all or a portion of the securities hereby registered publicly or through private transactions at prevailing market prices or at negotiated prices. We will not receive any of the proceeds from such sales of the Ordinary Shares or warrants, except with respect to amounts received by us upon the exercise of the warrants. We will bear all costs, expenses and fees in connection with the registration of these securities, including with regard to compliance with state securities or “blue sky” laws. The Selling Securityholders will bear all commissions and discounts, if any, attributable to their sale of Ordinary Shares or warrants. See “Plan of Distribution”.

Our Ordinary Shares and Warrants are listed on The Nasdaq Global Market under the symbols “CLBT” and “CLBTW”, respectively. On March 28, 2022, the last reported sales price of our Ordinary Shares was $6.31 per share and the last reported sales price of our warrants was $1.15 per warrant.

We are a “foreign private issuer,” and an “emerging growth company” each as defined under the federal securities laws, and, as such, we are subject to reduced public company reporting requirements. See the section entitled “Prospectus Summary — Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company and a Foreign Private Issuer” for additional information.

Investing in our securities involves a high degree of risk. You should review carefully the risks and uncertainties described under the heading “Risk Factors” beginning on page 12 of this prospectus, and under similar headings in any amendment or supplements to this prospectus.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or passed upon the adequacy or accuracy of this prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

The date of this prospectus is            , 2022.

 

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Page

FREQUENTLY USED TERMS

 

1

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

3

PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

 

5

THE OFFERING

 

11

RISK FACTORS

 

12

USE OF PROCEEDS

 

44

MARKET PRICE OF OUR SECURITIES

 

45

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

46

BUSINESS

 

61

MANAGEMENT

 

73

DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES

 

105

BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP OF SECURITIES

 

118

SELLING SECURITYHOLDERS

 

120

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

123

CERTAIN MATERIAL U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS

 

126

CERTAIN MATERIAL ISRAELI TAX CONSIDERATIONS

 

138

PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

 

145

LEGAL MATTERS

 

148

EXPERTS

 

148

WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

 

148

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

F-1

No one has been authorized to provide you with information that is different from that contained in this prospectus or any free writing prospectus filed by us. This prospectus is dated as of the date set forth on the cover hereof. You should not assume that the information contained in this prospectus is accurate as of any date other than that date.

For investors outside the United States: We have not done anything that would permit this offering or possession or distribution of this prospectus in any jurisdiction where action for that purpose is required, other than in the United States. You are required to inform yourselves about and to observe any restrictions relating to this offering and the distribution of this prospectus.

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FREQUENTLY USED TERMS

Unless otherwise stated or unless the context otherwise requires, the terms “Company,” “the registrant,” “our company,” “the company,” “we,” “us,” “our,” “ours,” and “Cellebrite” refer to Cellebrite DI Ltd., a company organized under the laws of the State of Israel. In this prospectus:

“Amended Articles” means the amended and restated articles of association of Cellebrite.

“Amended and Restated Warrant Agreement” means that certain Warrant Agreement, dated as of August 30, 2021, by and between the Company and American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, LLC.

“Business Combination” means the Merger and the other transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement.

“Business Combination Agreement” means the Business Combination Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated as of April 8, 2021, by and among TWC, Cellebrite and Merger Sub, as such agreement may be amended or otherwise modified from time to time in accordance with its terms.

“Cellebrite” means Cellebrite DI Ltd., a company organized under the laws of the State of Israel.

“Cellebrite Board” means the board of directors of Cellebrite.

“Closing” means the closing of the Merger and the transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement.

“Closing Date” means the date on which the Closing was completed, on August 30, 2021.

“Code” means the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.

“DGCL” means the Delaware General Corporation Law.

“DTC” means The Depository Trust Company.

“Effective Time” means the effective time of the Merger pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement.

“Exchange Act” means the U.S. Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.

“Existing TWC Charter” means TWC’s current certificate of incorporation.

“Insiders” means the executive officers and directors of TWC.

“IPO” means the initial public offering of Units of TWC, consummated on September 15, 2020.

“Merger” means the merger of Merger Sub with and into TWC, with TWC surviving the merger and becoming a wholly-owned subsidiary of Cellebrite, along with the other transactions contemplated by the Merger Agreement.

“Merger Agreement” means the Business Combination Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated as of April 8, 2021, by and among TWC, Cellebrite and Merger Sub, as such agreement may be amended or otherwise modified from time to time in accordance with its terms.

“Merger Sub” means Cupcake Merger Sub, Inc., a Delaware corporation and a direct wholly owned Subsidiary of the Company.

“Nasdaq” means the Nasdaq Capital Market.

“Ordinary Shares” means the Ordinary Shares, par value of NIS 0.00001 per share, of Cellebrite, having one vote per share.

“PIPE Investments” means the purchase of an aggregate of 30,000,000 Ordinary Shares pursuant to the Share Purchase Agreements.

“PIPE Investors” means those certain institutional accredited investors participating in the PIPE Investments pursuant to the Share Purchase Agreements.

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“PIPE Shares” means the 30,000,000 Ordinary Shares subscribed for and to be purchased by the PIPE Investors pursuant to the Share Purchase Agreements.

“Private Warrants” means the TWC Warrants sold to the Sponsor in a private placement in connection with the IPO.

“Public Shares” means shares of TWC Class A Common Stock issued as part of the TWC Units sold in the IPO.

“Public Stockholders” means the holders of Public Shares of TWC.

“Public Warrants” means the TWC Warrants included in Units sold to persons other than the Sponsor in the IPO.

“SEC” means the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

“Securities Act” means the U.S. Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

“Share Purchase Agreements” means the share purchase agreements entered into by the PIPE Investors, pursuant to which the PIPE Investors have committed to subscribe for and purchase the PIPE Shares at a purchase price per share of $10.00.

“Sponsor” means TWC Tech Holdings II, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, an initial stockholder of TWC.

“Sponsor Parties” means TWC and certain affiliates of TWC.

“Sponsor Shares” means shares of TWC Class B Common Stock, 15,000,000 of which were issued to the Sponsor and certain Insiders prior to the IPO.

“Sponsor Warrants” means TWC Warrants sold to the Sponsor in a private placement in connection with the IPO and held by the Sponsor or its permitted transferees.

“Stock Split Multiple” means the quotient of (i) the Pre-Split Closing Equity Value per Share (as defined in the Business Combination Agreement), divided by (ii) the SPAC Class A Closing Value Per Share (as defined in the Business Combination Agreement), equal to 0.96.

“Transaction” or “Transactions” means the transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement and the Share Purchase Agreements to occur at or immediately prior to the Closing, including the Merger.

“Trust Account” means the trust account that holds a portion of the proceeds of the IPO and the concurrent sale of the Sponsor Warrants.

“TWC” means TWC Tech Holdings II Corp., a Delaware corporation.

“TWC Units” means units issued in the IPO, each consisting of one Public Share and one-third of one Public Warrant.

“TWC Warrant” means a warrant of TWC.

“U.S.” means the United States of America.

“U.S. dollar,” “USD,” “US$” and “$” mean the legal currency of the United States.

“U.S. GAAP” means generally accepted accounting principles in the United States.

“Warrants” means the outstanding warrants of Cellebrite.

“Warrant Agreement” means that certain Warrant Agreement, dated as of September 10, 2020, between TWC and American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, LLC.

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CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Certain statements in this prospectus may constitute “forward-looking statements” for purposes of the federal securities laws. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements regarding Cellebrite, or its management team’s expectations, hopes, beliefs, intentions or strategies regarding the future. In addition, any statements that refer to projections, forecasts or other characterizations of future events or circumstances, including any underlying assumptions, are forward-looking statements. The words “anticipate,” “appear,” “approximate,” “believe,” “continue,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “foresee,” “intends,” “may,” “might,” “plan,” “possible,” “potential,” “predict,” “project,” “seek,” “should,” “would” and similar expressions (or the negative version of such words or expressions) may identify forward-looking statements, but the absence of these words does not mean that a statement is not forward-looking. Forward-looking statements in this prospectus may include, for example, statements about Cellebrite’s strategic and business plans, relationships or outlook, the impact of trends on and interest in its business, intellectual property or product, and its future results. The statements we make regarding the following matters are forward-looking by their nature:

•        our belief that our largest expansion opportunity lies in delivering solutions to new departments and to new buying centers within existing customers;

•        our expectation to extend our DI platform with new SaaS offerings in the next five years;

•        our expectation to continue to enter into joint ventures, partnerships, and strategic alliances as part of our long-term business strategy;

•        our expectation that we may change our pricing model from time to time;

•        our expectation that the decrease of the sale of perpetual licenses to continue;

•        our expectation that our gross margin will fluctuate from period to period depending on the interplay of various factors;

•        our expectation that our research and development expenses will continue to increase, as we invest in research and development headcount to further strengthen and enhance our solutions;

•        our expectation that sales and marketing expenses will continue to increase as we continue to hire additional sales and marketing personnel and invest in sales and marketing programs;

•        our anticipation of continuing to incur additional expenses due to growing our operations and being a public company, including higher legal, corporate insurance and accounting expenses;

•        our anticipation that a material portion of our expenses will continue to be denominated in ILS;

•        our plan to develop future solutions to capture additional revenue opportunities within our customer base and with new customers;

•        our plan to continue to increase penetration within our existing customers with our complete DI platform of software and services and by expanding the breadth of our platform capabilities to provide for continued up-sell and cross-selling opportunities across the DI platform and to new buying centers;

•        our plan to promote our offerings to address more private sector use cases;

•        our plan to tailor our solutions to meet more use cases in enterprise and drive customer growth;

•        our plan to increase substantially our subscription business by 2023;

•        our intention to drive new customer growth in the private sector by focusing on enterprise accounts and introducing offerings to address customers’ needs (for example, our additional remote collection offering);

•        our plan to engage in acquisitions that complement our technology and accelerate time to market; and

•        our intention to continue to make efforts to increase our international operations and anticipate that international sales will continue to account for a significant portion of our revenue.

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The preceding list is not intended to be an exhaustive list of all of our forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements are based on our beliefs, assumptions and expectations of future performance, taking into account the information currently available to us. These statements are only predictions based upon our current expectations and projections about future events. There are important factors that could cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to differ materially from the results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. In particular, you should consider the risks provided under “Risk Factors” in this proxy statement/prospectus.

You should not rely upon forward-looking statements as predictions of future events. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee that future results, levels of activity, performance and events and circumstances reflected in the forward-looking statements will be achieved or will occur. Except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements for any reason after the date of this prospectus, to conform these statements to actual results or to changes in our expectations.

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PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

This summary highlights selected information from this prospectus and does not contain all of the information that is important to you in making an investment decision. This summary is qualified in its entirety by the more detailed information included in this prospectus. Before making your investment decision with respect to our securities, you should carefully read this entire prospectus, including the information under “Risk Factors,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and the financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Unless otherwise indicated or the context otherwise requires, references in this prospectus to “Company”, “we,” “our,” “us” and other similar terms refer to Cellebrite DI Ltd. and our consolidated subsidiaries.

General

Cellebrite DI Ltd. (“Cellebrite”) a company organized under the laws of the State of Israel, is the leading provider of digital intelligence (“DI”), delivering a platform of software and services for legally sanctioned investigations.

On April 8, 2021, Cellebrite entered into a Business Combination Agreement and Plan of Merger (the “Merger Agreement”) with TWC Tech Holdings II Corp. (“TWC”), a public listed company in Nasdaq and Cupcake Merger Sub, Inc., a new wholly-owned subsidiary of Cellebrite (the “Merger Sub”) in the USA. TWC is a Special Purpose Acquisition Company (SPAC). On August 30, 2021, the Merger was consummated. Upon the terms and subject to the conditions of the Merger Agreement, at the Effective Time, Merger Sub merged with and into TWC, the separate corporate existence of Merger Sub ceased and TWC became the surviving corporation and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Cellebrite (the “Merger”). TWC became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Cellebrite and the securityholders of TWC became securityholders of Cellebrite.

On the date of Closing of the Merger (the “Closing”) and prior to the Merger becoming effective by acceptance of the Merger Certificate for filing by the Secretary of State of the State of Delaware, and prior to the Company’s Preferred Share conversion into Ordinary Shares as described below, an initial dividend of $21,300,000 (“Initial Dividend”) and an additional dividend of $78,700,000 approved by the Israeli District Court (“Additional Dividend”) were paid to the holders of Company’s Ordinary Shares, Preferred Shares and vested restricted stock units (“RSU”) (all the “Company Shareholders”).

On April 8, 2021, concurrently with the execution of the Merger Agreement, certain accredited investors (the “PIPE Investors” and each, a “PIPE Investor”) entered into share purchase agreements (the “Share Purchase Agreements” and each, a “Share Purchase Agreement”) pursuant to which the PIPE Investors committed to purchase Ordinary Shares of Cellebrite (“Ordinary Shares” and each, a “Ordinary Share”) from certain Cellebrite shareholders at a purchase price of $10.00 per share in an aggregate number equal to 30,000,000 and an aggregate purchase price of $300,000,000 (the “PIPE Investments” and each, a “PIPE Investment”) on the Closing Date, which were converted into 30,000,000 shares upon the consummation of the Merger. The PIPE Investment closed immediately prior to the Merger.

Following the closing of the PIPE Investment, and after giving effect to redemptions of shares by shareholders of TWC and payment of transaction expenses, the transactions described above generated approximately $69 million for Cellebrite (resulting in total cash on hand of over $17 million).

The mailing address for Cellebrite’s principal executive office is 94 Shlomo Shmelzer Road, Petah Tikva 4970602, P.O.B 3925 Israel and its telephone number is +972 (73) 394-8000.

Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company and a Foreign Private Issuer

Emerging Growth Company

Cellebrite is an “emerging growth company,” as defined in Section 2(a) of the Securities Act, as modified by the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”). As such, Cellebrite is eligible to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not “emerging growth companies” including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in their periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from

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the requirements of holding a non-binding advisory vote on executive compensation and stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. If some investors find Cellebrite’s securities less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for Cellebrite’s securities and the prices of Cellebrite’s securities may be more volatile.

Further, Section 102(b)(1) of the JOBS Act exempts emerging growth companies from being required to comply with new or revised financial accounting standards until private companies (that is, those that have not had a Securities Act registration statement declared effective or do not have a class of securities registered under the Exchange Act) are required to comply with the new or revised financial accounting standards. The JOBS Act provides that a company can elect to opt out of the extended transition period and comply with the requirements that apply to non-emerging growth companies but any such election to opt out is irrevocable. Cellebrite has elected not to opt out of such extended transition period, which means that when a standard is issued or revised and it has different application dates for public or private companies, Cellebrite, as an emerging growth company, can adopt the new or revised standard at the time private companies adopt the new or revised standard. This may make comparison of Cellebrite’s financial statements with certain other public companies difficult or impossible because of the potential differences in accounting standards used.

Cellebrite will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of: (i) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the closing of the Merger, (b) in which Cellebrite has total annual gross revenue of at least $1.07 billion, or (c) in which Cellebrite is deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of Cellebrite’s common equity that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last business day of its most recently completed second fiscal quarter; and (ii) the date on which Cellebrite has issued more than $1.00 billion in non-convertible debt securities during the prior three-year period. References herein to “emerging growth company” have the meaning associated with it in the JOBS Act.

Foreign Private Issuer

Cellebrite is a “foreign private issuer” under SEC rules. Consequently, Cellebrite is subject to the reporting requirements under the Exchange Act applicable to foreign private issuers. Cellebrite filed its annual report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2021 with the SEC on March 29, 2022, and will be required to file its annual report on Form 20-F for the year ending December 31, 2022 with the SEC by April 30, 2023. In addition, Cellebrite will furnish reports on Form 6-K to the SEC regarding certain information required to be publicly disclosed by Cellebrite in Israel or that is distributed or required to be distributed by Cellebrite to its shareholders. Cellebrite also expects to issue interim quarterly financial information publicly and to furnish it to the SEC under cover of Form 6-K.

Based on its foreign private issuer status, Cellebrite will not be required to file periodic reports and financial statements with the SEC as frequently or as promptly as a U.S. company whose securities are registered under the Exchange Act. Cellebrite will also not be required to comply with Regulation FD, which addresses certain restrictions on the selective disclosure of material information. In addition, among other matters, Cellebrite officers, directors and principal shareholders will be exempt from the reporting and “short-swing” profit recovery provisions of Section 16 of the Exchange Act and the rules under the Exchange Act with respect to their purchases and sales of Ordinary Shares.

Summary Risk Factors

Investing in our securities involves risks. You should carefully consider the risks described in “Risk Factors” before making a decision to invest in our Ordinary Shares. If any of these risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition and results of operations would likely be materially adversely affected. In such case, the trading price of our securities would likely decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment. Set forth below is a summary of some of the principal risks we face:

•        If we do not continue to develop technologically advanced solutions and successfully integrate with the software solutions used by our customers, our future revenue and operating results may be negatively affected.

•        We are materially dependent on acceptance of our solutions by law enforcement markets and government agencies, both domestic and international. If law enforcement and other government agencies do not continue to purchase, accept and use our solutions, our revenue may be adversely affected.

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•        Real or perceived errors, failures, defects or bugs in our DI solutions could adversely affect our results of operations, growth prospects and reputation.

•        A failure to maintain sales and marketing personnel productivity or hire, integrate and retain additional sales and marketing personnel could adversely affect our results of operations and growth prospects.

•        The ongoing global COVID-19 pandemic could negatively impact our business, installations, trainings, and general operations.

•        Current and future competitors could have a significant impact on our ability to generate future revenue and profits.

•        We face intense competition and could face pricing pressure from, and lose market share to our competitors, which would adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

•        If our solutions are inadvertently or deliberately misused by customers, such customers may achieve sub-optimal results, which could lead to the perception that our solutions are low-quality.

•        Our reputation and brand are important to our success, and we may not be able to maintain and enhance our reputation and brand, which would adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

•        The estimates of market opportunity and forecasts of market growth and financial results publicized in connection with the Merger may prove to be inaccurate, and even if the market in which we compete achieves the forecasted growth, our business could fail to grow at similar rates, if at all.

•        Changes to our packaging and licensing models could adversely affect our ability to attract or retain customers.

•        If we fail to manage future growth effectively, our business could be harmed.

•        Our future growth depends in part on our ability to introduce new solutions and add-ons and our failure to do so may harm business and operating results.

•        We conduct a fairly low volume of our business via e-commerce, which may result in the purchase process being more difficult for customers compared to other businesses.

•        Issues in the use of artificial intelligence (“AI”) (including machine learning) in our platform may result in reputational harm or liability.

•        We may require additional capital to support the growth of our business, and this capital might not be available on acceptable terms, if at all.

•        Higher costs or unavailability of materials used to create hardware could adversely affect our financial results.

•        Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates could materially affect our financial results.

•        The sales cycle for some of our solutions can be lengthy.

•        If we are unable to retain qualified personnel and senior management, including Yossi Carmil, our Chief Executive Officer, and hire and retain additional qualified personnel, our business could suffer.

•        The security of our operations and the integrity of our software solutions are critical to our operations and to maintaining the trust and confidence of our customers.

•        Cellebrite may be materially adversely affected by negative publicity related to its business and use of its products.

•        Our sales to government customers expose us to business volatility and risks, including government budgeting cycles and appropriations, early termination, audits, investigations, sanctions and penalties.

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•        A decline in government budgets, changes in spending or budgetary priorities, or delays in contract awards may significantly and adversely affect our future revenue and limit our growth prospects.

•        Evolving government procurement policies and increased emphasis on cost over performance could adversely affect our business.

•        Changes in civil forfeiture laws may affect our customers’ ability to purchase our solutions.

•        Our revenue from private sector customers could be adversely affected by any weakening of economic conditions.

•        Failure to adequately obtain, maintain, protect and enforce our intellectual property and other proprietary rights could adversely affect our business.

•        We may be subject to information technology system breaches, failures, or disruptions that could harm our operations, financial condition or reputation.

•        Some of our software and systems contain open source software, which may pose particular risks to our proprietary software and information technology systems.

•        Other companies may claim that we infringe their intellectual property, which could materially increase costs and materially harm our ability to generate future revenue and profits.

•        Certain of our solutions may be perceived as, or determined by the courts to be, a violation of privacy rights and related laws. Any such perception or determination could adversely affect our revenue and results of operations.

•        Some of our solutions may be used by customers in a way that is, or that is perceived to be, incompatible with human rights. Any such perception could adversely affect our reputation, revenue and results of operations.

•        We may not enter into relationships with potential customers if we consider their activities to be inconsistent with our organizational mission or values.

•        We occasionally have limited access to third party data, and if our security measures are breached and unauthorized access to this data is obtained, our systems, data centers and our solutions may be perceived as not being secure, customers may curtail or stop using our service and we may incur significant legal and financial exposure and liabilities.

•        Our business is subject to complex and evolving U.S. and non-U.S. laws and regulations regarding privacy, data protection and security, technology protection, and other matters. Many of these laws and regulations are subject to change and uncertain interpretation, and could result in claims, changes to our business practices, monetary penalties, increased cost of operations, or otherwise harm our business.

•        We may in the future become involved in legal, regulatory, or administrative inquiries and proceedings, and unfavorable outcomes in litigation or other of these matters could negatively impact our business, financial conditions, and results of operations.

•        We are subject to Israeli encryption laws and governmental trade controls, including export and regulations, and any noncompliance with these laws could negatively impact our operating results.

•        Our largest shareholder, SUNCORPORATION, is a Japanese public company and currently a holder of 50.7% of Cellebrite’s outstanding shares.

•        A variety of new and existing laws and/or interpretations could materially and adversely affect our business.

•        Failure to comply with laws, regulations, or contractual provisions applicable to our business could cause us to lose government customers or our ability to contract with the U.S. and other governments.

•        Conditions in Israel could materially and adversely affect our business.

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•        It may be difficult to enforce a U.S. judgment against us, our officers and directors or the experts named in this prospectus in Israel or the United States, or to assert U.S. securities laws claims in Israel or serve process on our officers and directors or experts.

•        Your rights and responsibilities as our shareholder are governed by Israeli law, which may differ in some respects from the rights and responsibilities of shareholders of U.S. corporations.

•        Provisions in the Amended Articles may have the effect of discouraging lawsuits against us and our directors and officers.

•        Future resales of the Ordinary Shares issued in connection with the Business Combination may cause the market price of the Ordinary Shares to drop significantly, even if Cellebrite’s business is doing well.

•        As a “foreign private issuer” under applicable securities laws and regulations, Cellebrite is permitted to, and may, file less or different information with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) than a company incorporated in the United States, and will follow certain home country governance practices in lieu of certain Nasdaq requirements applicable to U.S. issuers.

•        Cellebrite is an “emerging growth company” and as a result of the reduced disclosure and governance requirements applicable to emerging growth companies, our securities may be less attractive to investors.

•        Our share price has been and will likely continue to be volatile, and you may lose all or part of your investment.

•        The US Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) may not agree that Cellebrite should be treated as a non-U.S. corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

•        Section 7874 may limit the ability of TWC to use certain tax attributes, increase Cellebrite’s U.S. affiliates’ U.S. taxable income or have other adverse consequences to Cellebrite and Cellebrite’s shareholders.

•        If we do not qualify for Israeli tax benefits, our effective tax rate on our business income and the Israeli withholding tax on distributions of dividends by us to our shareholders may be higher than expected.

•        We may be subject to deferred Israeli corporate tax liability with respect to certain payments out of income that was previously exempt from Israeli corporate tax.

•        We may be required to pay Israeli taxes, including by way of withholding from our shareholders, as a result of the transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement, and if we do not receive the Transaction Tax Ruling exempting the Indemnified TWC Parties from certain taxes we may be required to indemnify the Indemnified TWC Parties for such Israeli withholding tax liability.

•        Joint ventures, partnerships, and strategic alliances may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and prospects.

•        We may acquire or invest in companies and technologies, which may divert our management’s attention, and result in additional dilution to our shareholders. We may be unable to integrate acquired businesses and technologies successfully or achieve the expected benefits of such acquisitions or investments.

•        Our international operations expose us to business, political and economic risks that could cause our operating results to suffer.

•        If our goodwill or intangible assets become impaired, we may be required to record a significant charge to earnings.

•        Our provision for income taxes and effective income tax rate may vary significantly and may adversely affect our results of operations and cash resources.

•        We are subject to anti-corruption, anti-bribery, and similar laws, and non-compliance with such laws can subject us to criminal penalties or significant fines, harm and reputation, and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and growth prospects.

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•        Our pricing structures for our solutions may change from time to time.

•        If we fail to maintain an effective system of internal controls, our ability to produce timely and accurate financial statements or comply with applicable regulations could be impaired.

•        If our estimates or judgments relating to our critical accounting policies prove to be incorrect, our results of operations could be adversely affected.

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THE OFFERING

Securities offered by the Selling Securityholders

 

We are registering the resale by the Sponsor and the Selling Securityholders named in this prospectus, or their permitted transferees, of 171,729,210 Ordinary Shares and Warrants to purchase 9,666,667 Ordinary Shares. We are also registering up to 20,000,000 Ordinary Shares issuable upon exercise of the public warrants that were previously registered and up to 9,666,667 Ordinary Shares underlying private placement warrants issued in a private placement to the Sponsor.

Terms of the Offering

 

The Selling Securityholders will determine when and how they will dispose of the Ordinary Shares and warrants registered under this prospectus for resale.

Shares outstanding prior to the offering

 

As of March 29, 2022, we had 188,540,480 Ordinary Shares issued and outstanding. This number of Ordinary Shares outstanding excludes 15,995,753 Ordinary Shares issuable upon the exercise of Warrants with an exercise price of $11.50 per share.

Use of proceeds

 

We will not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of the warrants or Ordinary Shares by the Selling Securityholders except with respect to amounts received by us due to the exercise of the warrants. We expect to use the proceeds received from the exercise of the warrants, if any, for working capital and general corporate purposes.

Nasdaq ticker symbol

 

Our Ordinary Shares and warrants are listed on Nasdaq under the symbols “CLBT” and “CLBTW,” respectively.

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RISK FACTORS

An investment in our securities involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks described below before making an investment decision. Our business, prospects, financial condition, or operating results could be harmed by any of these risks, as well as other risks not known to us or that we consider immaterial as of the date of this prospectus. The trading price of our securities could decline due to any of these risks, and, as a result, you may lose all or part of your investment.

Risks Related to Cellebrite’s Business and Industry

If we do not continue to develop technologically advanced solutions and successfully integrate with the software solutions used by our customers, our future revenue and operating results may be negatively affected.

Cellebrite offers a comprehensive DI platform that includes a variety of solutions designed to help our customers collect, review, analyze and manage investigative data with respect to legally sanctioned investigations. We specialize in the creation of software based solutions that enable collection, decoding, decryption, analysis, reporting and management of data from digital devices and sources from a variety of original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) as well as the applications installed on such sources. Because OEMs and other software manufacturers are continuously changing their products, our success depends on our ability to design and develop new solutions and upgrades to our existing software that keep up with these changes. However, there can be no assurance that we are able to design and develop adequate solutions and upgrades that will be compatible with products from OEMs and other software manufacturers. If we are unable to update our software to keep up with the evolving security and encryption strategies in the industry, the utilization of our solutions may decrease over time if it becomes unable to extract data from certain digital devices and our software may be vulnerable to malicious attacks. As a result, our reputation might be harmed and our operating results may be negatively affected.

If we experience high turnover of our solutions and development personnel, a lack of managerial resources to guide our research and development, or a lack of other research and development resources, we may miss or fail to execute on new solutions development and strategic opportunities and consequently lose potential and actual market share. The success of our business is dependent on our product and development teams developing and executing on a roadmap that allows us to retain and increase the spending of our existing customers and attract new customers. We believe we offer high-quality solutions with features not offered by competitors selling at a lower price point, and so a failure to continue offering the same caliber of solutions will adversely affect revenue and operating results.

We are materially dependent on acceptance of our solutions by law enforcement markets and government agencies, both domestic and international. If law enforcement and other government agencies do not continue to purchase, accept and use our solutions, our revenue may be adversely affected.

Sales to law enforcement agencies accounted for approximately 90% of our revenue in 2019, 2020 and 2021. At any point, due to external factors and opinions, whether or not related to product performance, law enforcement agencies may elect to no longer purchase our solutions. The key dynamics and trends affecting the digital investigations and intelligence market include: (i) the explosive growth in the volume of data production and availability, (ii) the increases in data complexity, (iii) the lack of digital forensic professionals, (iv) constraints in resources in the public sector, (v) the growing frequency, sophistication and business impact of cybercrime in the private sector, (vi) the growing risk of insider threats and employee misconduct in private enterprises and (vii) the substantial increase in the remote workforce. For example, while we have not yet had any government clients cancel contracts due to the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, the pandemic may adversely impact the operating budgets of local governments, which may reduce the budget for law enforcement and corrections. In addition, although we have experienced no negative impact on our revenue from the recent changes in public sentiment around police funding, such as the “Defund the Police” movement, these changes may impact our revenue in the future. Revenue growth may be impacted by changes in organizational structure leading to complex decision-making processes within the public sector or by a reduction in the pace of adoption of investigation and justice acceleration related technologies.

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Real or perceived errors, failures, defects or bugs in our DI solutions could adversely affect our results of operations, growth prospects and reputation.

Because we offer a complex platform, undetected errors, defects, failures or bugs may occur, especially when solutions or capabilities are first introduced or when new versions or other product or infrastructure updates are released. Despite frequent testing by us and regular software updates, errors, failures, or bugs may not be found in new software or releases until after they are implemented, and this could adversely affect our reputation and our customers’ willingness to buy solutions from us, and adversely affect market acceptance or perception of our solutions.

Many of our customers, especially those in law enforcement, use our solutions in applications that are of public interest or critical to their businesses or missions and may thus have a lower risk tolerance to defects in our solutions than to defects in other, less critical, software solutions. Errors or delays in releasing software updates or allegations of unsatisfactory performance or errors, defects or failures in released software could cause us, in the long run, to lose sales opportunities, increase our service costs, incur substantial software redesigning costs, lose customers or subject us to liability for damages and divert our resources from other tasks, any one of which could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, our solutions could be perceived as ineffective for reasons outside of our control.

An error, failure or bug in any of our solutions by our law enforcement customers could lead to interference with the administration of justice, for example by corrupting digital evidence. Real or perceived errors, failures, or bugs in our solutions, or dissatisfaction with our solutions and outcomes, could result in customer terminations. In such an event, we may be required, or we may choose, for customer relations or other reasons, to expend additional resources in order to help correct any such errors, failures, or bugs.

A failure to maintain sales and marketing personnel productivity or hire, integrate and retain additional sales and marketing personnel could adversely affect our results of operations and growth prospects.

Our business requires intensive sales and marketing activities. Part of our strategy is to attract a larger number of large law enforcement customers to use more of our solutions. Our sales and marketing personnel are essential to this effort and to attracting new customers and expanding sales to existing customers generally. We require personnel with expertise in government contracting at both the federal and local level in a variety of countries, and expertise in the private market, and with sufficient technical literacy to discuss our solutions’ features. There is a limited number of individuals with this experience and competition for them is intense. Furthermore, once hired it takes at least three months before a new sales force member is fully trained and operating at a level that meets our expectations, and during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic such training may take even longer. We invest significant time and resources in training new members of our sales force, and we may be unable to achieve our target performance levels with new sales personnel as rapidly as we have done in the past, or at all, due to larger numbers of hires or lack of experience training sales personnel to operate in new jurisdictions or because of the remote hiring and training process. Our failure to hire a sufficient number of qualified individuals, to integrate new sales force members within the time periods we have achieved historically, and to contain sales force attrition rates may materially impact the growth of our business.

The ongoing global COVID-19 pandemic could negatively impact our business, installations, trainings, and general operations.

The outbreak of the novel coronavirus and the COVID-19 disease that it causes has evolved into a global pandemic, and it is unclear how long nations, populations, economics and businesses will have to operate under the current conditions. In light of the uncertain and rapidly evolving situation relating to the spread of COVID-19 and its variants, we have taken precautionary measures intended to minimize the risk of the virus to our employees, our customers, and the communities in which we operate, including temporarily limiting in-person customer training events, which may negatively impact our business.

While the COVID-19 pandemic to date has not had any noticeable impact on our contract renewal rate, it is possible that it will in the future. Many of our customers are government agencies, and their budgets may have been and may continue to be stretched thin due to the efforts taken to combat the pandemic. If some of our government customers experience budget shortfalls, they may decide to forgo using our platform.

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Further, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused and may continue to cause delays in onboarding new customers. In certain countries, customers have had issues accessing their systems remotely in order to generate purchase orders, and this has led to some processing delays. While none of these delays has been significant, they may become significant in the future or transition from delays to outright cancellation.

Additionally, a significant portion of our training activities are usually in person. In the normal course of business, our on-premises training staff teach in physical classrooms either at the customers’ facilities or in facilities rented by us. Currently, due to travel restriction and personal distance requirements, the Company offers its classes either in a remote format or on-premises. Also, in the normal course of business, our on-the-ground on-premises deployment staff travel to our customers’ workplaces to demonstrate how to use our solutions. Currently, however, as a result of the work and travel restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic and the precautionary measures that we have adopted or that local governments prescribe, substantially all of our training activities are being conducted remotely. The remote offering of our services could lead to a decrease in efficacy or value, potentially making our solutions less appealing.

Furthermore, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, in principal our employees are currently required to work from the office three times a week and work remotely the remaining two days a week, reducing social interaction and related health risks. Without derogating from the above mentioned, employees who live distant from our offices are currently not required to travel to the offices on a regular basis. The Company is constantly monitoring the health risks to its employees in the various countries in which they work, and provides temporarily adjustment to this policy. It is possible that widespread remote work arrangements may have a negative impact on our operations, the execution of our business plans, the productivity and availability of key personnel and other employees necessary to conduct our business, and on third-party service providers who perform critical services for us, or otherwise cause operational failures due to changes in our normal business practices necessitated by the outbreak and related governmental actions. If a natural disaster, power outage, connectivity issue, or other event occurred that impacted our employees’ ability to work remotely, it may be difficult or, in certain cases, impossible, for us to continue our business for a substantial period of time. The increase in remote working may also result in increased consumer privacy, data security, and fraud risks, and our understanding of applicable legal and regulatory requirements, as well as the latest guidance from regulatory authorities in connection with the COVID-19 pandemic, may be subject to legal or regulatory challenge, particularly as regulatory guidance evolves in response to future developments. Any such incident, breach or attack that occurs with respect to, or is directed at us could have a materially adverse effect due to, among other things, the loss of proprietary data, interruptions or delays in our operations, damage to our reputation and any government-imposed penalties. In addition, continuous remote work arrangements could result in increased turnover or make it more difficult to train new employees.

COVID-19 has also had an impact on supply chains with many products as some companies have had to either suspend or limit operations. During 2021, we experienced disruption and volatility in our supply chain that we expect to continue through 2022. Supply chain issues have occurred on a global scale as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and have caused delays in the arrival of or otherwise constrained our supply of components, including the HW component, which are essential to our solutions. Other supply chain risks that have materialized and may continue to materialize include, but are not limited to: disruptions in shipping logistics, as ports and other channels of entry from where we import, export and deliver our components have been closed or continue to operate at reduced capacity; shutdowns or reduced operations at our suppliers’ facilities; and changes in the market prices for components upon which we rely. Difficulties or interruptions obtaining the components required for our solutions has and could continue to delay our supply of solutions and harm our relationships with our customers, damage our brand and reputation and have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

More generally, the COVID-19 pandemic has adversely affected and may continue to adversely affect economies and financial markets globally, which may lead to a continued economic downturn, which may decrease technology spending generally and could adversely affect demand for our solutions. A prolonged pandemic could also result in extended customer sales cycles; reduced demand for our products and services; lower renewal rates; delayed spending on, or reduced payment frequencies with respect to, our solutions; lower revenue from new customers; or impairment of our ability to collect accounts receivable. It is not possible at this time to estimate the full impact that COVID-19 will have on our business, as the impact will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted.

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Current and future competitors could have a significant impact on our ability to generate future revenue and profits.

The markets for our solutions are competitive and are subject to rapid technological change and other pressures created by changes in our industry. We face varying levels of competition across our solution offerings. Our Collect & Review solutions, including the Cellebrite’s Universal Forensic Extraction Device (“UFED”) series and Cellebrite Premium, face significant competition. Our competitors offer products similar to our Collect & Review solutions generally with fewer capabilities but lower price points, and some customers may determine that they prefer these competitors’ products based on cost. Some customers have decided to purchase both our solutions and a competitor’s products for verification purposes. However, these customers may later decide to terminate their use of a second product, potentially ours, depending on which of our solutions the customers are purchasing. Our Analyze solutions, such as Cellebrite Pathfinder, currently face relatively limited competition but this could change in the future as the increase in data volumes attract analytics-driven competitors. Our main Manage solution, Guardian, addresses a growing trend to manage digital evidence in a SaaS delivery model. Negative public sentiment towards Cloud and SaaS might impact the adoption of this solution. Our new OSINT solutions (OSINT Analyze and OSINT Investigate) are introduced to a business segment with a low barrier of entry and several existing competitors, while each provide some specific expertise. OSINT’s market is shared with different companies, with no significant company dominating the market. The challenges within OSINT’s market include low adoption of the techonology by law enforcement agencies as well as the dynamic nature of the web (more specifically, website owners update their algorithms in order to identify and block the solution’s activity, which might impact its effectiveness in collecting data) and online sources that constantly change (more specifically, data displayed on websites change overtime and require constant updating of the data collecting).

Competition may increase and intensify in the future as the pace of technological change and adaptation quickens and as additional companies enter our markets, including those competitors who offer solutions similar to ours, but offer it through a different form of delivery. Numerous releases of competitive products have occurred in recent history and are expected to continue in the future. We may not be able to compete effectively with current competitors and potential entrants into our marketplace. We could lose market share if our current or prospective competitors: (i) develop technologies that are perceived to be substantially equivalent or superior to our technologies, (ii) introduce new competitive products or services, (iii) add new functionality to existing products and services, (iv) acquire competitive products and services, (v) reduce prices, or (vi) form strategic alliances or cooperative relationships with other companies. If other businesses were to engage in aggressive pricing policies with respect to competing products, or if the dynamics in our marketplace resulted in increasing bargaining power by the consumers of our solutions, we might need to lower the prices we charge for the solutions we offer. This could result in lower revenue or reduced profit margins, either of which may materially adversely affect our business and operating results.

We face intense competition and could face pricing pressure from, and lose market share to our competitors, which would adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

Many of our current and potential competitors are larger and may have substantially greater resources than we have and expect to have in the future. They may also be able to devote greater resources to the development of their current and future technologies or the promotion of their offerings or offer lower prices. Our current and potential competitors may also establish cooperative or strategic relationships among themselves or with third parties that may further enhance their resources and offerings. Further, it is possible that domestic or foreign companies or governments, some with substantial experience in the DI industry or greater financial resources than we possess, will seek to provide solutions that compete directly or indirectly with ours in the future. Any such foreign competitor, for example, could benefit from subsidies from, or other protective measures by, its home country.

We believe our ability to compete successfully in delivering DI at significantly reduced cost to customers does and will depend on a number of factors, which may change in the future due to increased competition, our ability to meet our customers’ needs and the frequency and availability of our offerings. If we are unable to compete successfully, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

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If our solutions are inadvertently or deliberately misused by customers, such customers may achieve sub-optimal results, which could lead to the perception that our solutions are low-quality.

Once purchased, our solutions are operated by our customers, and if our customers do not use the platform correctly or as intended, inadequate performance or outcomes may result. Our solutions are sometimes used by customers with smaller or less sophisticated IT departments, and professional practitioners, potentially resulting in such platform performing at a lower level than anticipated by the customer. Our customers rely on our solutions to address important goals and challenges, and so the incorrect or improper use or configuration of our solutions may result in contract terminations or non-renewals, reduced customer payments, negative publicity, or legal claims against us.

Furthermore, if customer personnel are not well trained in the use of our platform, customers may defer the deployment of our platform and solutions, may deploy them in a more limited manner than originally anticipated, or may not deploy them at all. If there is substantial turnover of Cellebrite or customer personnel responsible for procurement and/or use of our platform, our platform may go unused or be adopted less broadly, and our ability to make additional sales may be substantially limited, which could negatively impact our business, results of operations, and growth prospects.

Our reputation and brand are important to our success, and we may not be able to maintain and enhance our reputation and brand, which would adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

We believe that our brand and reputation are critical to driving our business. Building our brand will depend largely on our ability to continue to provide top-tier service, including high quality valued solutions, and appropriate price points, which we may not do successfully. Negative reviews or publicity about our solutions, services, deliverables, or customer support, especially on media outlets, could harm our reputation and diminish our ability to make additional sales, which would adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

The estimates of market opportunity and forecasts of market growth and financial results publicized in connection with the Merger and/or in this prospectus may prove to be inaccurate, and even if the market in which we compete achieves the forecasted growth, our business could fail to grow at similar rates, if at all.

In connection with the Merger, we published certain market estimates and projected financial information (including revenue, gross profit, Adjusted EBITDA and net income), which reflected management’s judgments, estimates and assumptions with respect to our business, as well as general industry, economic, regulatory, market and financial conditions. We have also repeated the market estimates in this prospectus. The financial projections were not initially prepared with a view toward public disclosure, but were made available during the course of the merger process and disclosure in our registration statement on Form F-4 filed with the SEC in connection with the Merger. We may also provide publicly from time to time other projections relating to operational or financial performance.

Due to the multiple and complex drivers of technological change, and the diversified nature and global scope of the investigative customer base, it is difficult to estimate the size of our market and predict with certainty the rate at which the market for our solutions will grow, if at all, as well as to predict financial results for future periods. While our market potential and financial results estimates in our registration statement on Form F-4 and/or in this prospectus were made in good faith and based on assumptions and underlying estimates we believe to be reasonable, these estimates may not be accurate and the market potential might not materialize. If our estimate of the future size of our addressable market does not materialize, our future growth may be lower than anticipated, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

Changes to our packaging and licensing models could adversely affect our ability to attract or retain customers.

As we expand our offerings, we will face additional competition. For example, in the DI market, there are numerous brands and solutions that compete for sales, with competition based upon brand recognition and loyalty, product packaging, quality and innovation, licensing models, price and convenience. Hence, changes in our image, packaging and licensing models that are done for marketing and branding purposes could have a negative impact on our customers’ preference for us, which could adversely affect our ability to attract or retain customers.

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If we fail to manage future growth effectively, our business could be harmed.

For the last several years, we have experienced rapid growth. For example, our revenue has grown from $111 million in 2017 to $246 million in 2021, and our headcount has increased from 475 employees as of December 31, 2017 to 898 employees as of December 31, 2021. We operate in a growing market and have experienced, and may continue to experience, significant expansion of our operations. This growth has placed, and may continue to place, a strain on our employees, management systems, operational, financial, and other resources. As we have grown, we have increasingly managed larger and more complex deployments of our solutions with a broader base of government and commercial customers. As we continue to grow, we face challenges of integrating, developing, retaining, and motivating a rapidly growing employee base in various countries around the world. In the event of continued growth of our operations, our operational resources, including our information technology systems, our employee base, or our internal controls and procedures may not be adequate to support our operations and deployments. Managing our growth may require significant expenditures and allocation of valuable management resources, improving our operational, financial, and management processes and systems, and effectively expanding, training, and managing our employee base. If we fail to achieve the necessary level of efficiency in our organization as it grows, our business, financial condition, and results of operations would be harmed. As our organization continues to grow, we may find it increasingly difficult to maintain the benefits of our traditional company culture, including our ability to quickly respond to customers, and avoid a formal corporate structure. This could negatively affect our business performance or ability to hire or retain personnel in the near or long-term.

In addition, our rapid growth may make it difficult to evaluate our future prospects. Our ability to forecast our future results of operations is subject to a number of uncertainties, including our ability to effectively plan for and model future growth. We may encounter risks and uncertainties frequently experienced by growing companies with global operations in rapidly changing industries. If we fail to achieve the necessary level of efficiency in our organization as it grows, or if we are not able to accurately forecast future growth, our business, financial condition, and results of operations would be harmed.

Our future growth depends in part on our ability to introduce new solutions and add-ons and our failure to do so may harm business and operating results.

To remain competitive, we must continue to develop new offerings, as well as features and enhancements to our existing platform. Maintaining adequate research and development personnel and resources to meet the demands of the market is essential. If we experience high turnover of our product and development personnel, a lack of management ability to guide our research and development, or a lack of other research and development resources, we may miss or fail to execute on new offerings, developments and strategic opportunities and consequently lose potential and actual market share. The success of our business is dependent on our product and development teams developing and executing on a roadmap that allows us to retain and increase the spending of our existing customers and attract new customers. Our failure to do so could materially adversely affect our business.

We conduct a fairly low volume of our business via e-commerce, which may result in the purchase process being more difficult for customers compared to other businesses.

We do not sell our solutions to new customers over the Internet. While customers can initiate contact with us using our website, the ultimate purchase in most cases is not made through our website and is made only after an interactive discussion of the customer’s needs. For example, for customers in the private sector considering purchasing our Collect & Review solutions, such as UFED and Mobile Elite, we initiate the appropriate “know your customer” procedures which requires every private sector customer to complete a ‘Know Your Customer’ questionnaire which is then reviewed and approved by the Company’s compliance officer. In addition to the questionnaire, the Company’s compliance team performs an online vetting process to identify concerns with potential private sector’s customers. If no concerns are identified, the compliance team approves the vetting process, and ensures that all the reports and questionnaires are uploaded to the customer’s account for future monitoring. As a result, the purchase process can be lengthy compared to many e-commerce transactions, and it is possible that the length of the process may discourage some customers from completing the transaction with us rather than a competitor which offers online sales.

Our e-commerce system is available only for customers who have a valid license to use our solutions. Those customers may purchase selective solutions, renew existing license and purchase vouchers for our services, subject to the Company’s commercial guidelines. Our vouchers may only be used by customers who have a valid license to

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use our solutions, meaning that some interaction with us is generally required in order for the vouchers to be used. Our existing customers can renew their software and utilize vouchers for Cellebrite’s Advanced Services by utilizing our customers’ portal on the Internet. Customer training can be purchased online by existing customers and potential customers. See “— Risks Related to Our Business and Industry — The sales cycle for some of our solutions can be lengthy.”

Issues in the use of artificial intelligence (“AI”) (including machine learning) in our platform may result in reputational harm or liability.

AI is enabled by or integrated into our platform. For example, our Cellebrite Pathfinder solution, our principal investigative analytics tool, uses AI to allow customers to create unique search categories for reviewing video and image evidence. As with many developing technologies, AI presents risks and challenges that could affect its further development, adoption, and use, and therefore our business. AI algorithms may be flawed and may present risks due to a lack of back-testing. Datasets may be insufficient, of poor quality, or contain biased information. Inappropriate or controversial data practices by data scientists, engineers, and end-users of our systems could impair the acceptance of AI solutions. If the recommendations, forecasts, or analyses that AI applications assist in producing are deficient or inaccurate, we could be subjected to competitive harm, potential legal liability, and brand or reputational harm. Some AI scenarios present ethical issues, for example, due to unintentional basis that may stem from the predictive nature of AI algorithms. Though our business practices are designed to mitigate many of these risks, if we enable or offer AI solutions that are controversial because of their purported or real impact on human rights, privacy, employment, or other social issues, we may experience brand or reputational harm.

We may require additional capital to support the growth of our business, and this capital might not be available on acceptable terms, if at all.

As of December 31, 2021, we had cash and cash equivalents of $145.9 million and short-term deposits of $35.6 million. We will receive up to an aggregate amount of $341 million from the exercise of shares underlying Warrants registered for resale on our resale registration statement on Form F-1. We expect to meet our ongoing liquidity needs for at least the current year. However, we might require substantial additional financing in order to execute our inorganic growth strategy . Such financing might not be available on commercially reasonable terms, if at all. In particular, our ability to obtain financing for growth may depend in part on our ability to first enter into customer agreements sufficient to demonstrate such growth. If we are unable to obtain such financing, or secure sufficient customer agreements, on commercially reasonable terms, or at all, we will not be able to execute our growth strategy.

To the extent that we raise additional capital through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities, your ownership interest will be diluted, and the terms of those securities may include liquidation or other preferences that adversely affect your rights as a holder of Ordinary Shares or Warrants. Debt financing and preferred equity financing, if available, may involve agreements that include covenants limiting or restricting our ability to take specific actions, such as incurring additional debt, making acquisitions or capital expenditures or declaring dividends. Debt financing could also have significant negative consequences for our business, results of operations and financial condition, including, among others, increasing our vulnerability to adverse economic and industry conditions, limiting our ability to obtain additional financing, requiring the dedication of a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to service our indebtedness, thereby reducing the amount of our cash flow available for other purposes, limiting our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business, and placing us at a possible competitive disadvantage compared to less leveraged competitors or competitors that may have better access to capital resources.

If we raise additional funds through collaborations, strategic alliances or marketing, distribution or licensing arrangements with third parties, we may have to relinquish valuable rights to our technologies, future revenue streams, research programs or solutions, or grant licenses on terms that may not be favorable to us. If we are unable to raise additional funds through equity or debt financings or other arrangements when needed, we may be required to delay, limit, reduce or terminate our commercialization, research and development efforts or grant rights to third parties to market and/or develop solutions that we would otherwise prefer to market and develop ourselves.

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Higher costs or unavailability of materials used to create hardware could adversely affect our financial results.

We depend on certain suppliers for the delivery of components used in the assembly of our hardware products. In particular, we use specialized adapters which connect to phones and computers being examined . If we become unable to obtain any components necessary for our hardware products, we may struggle to fulfill contracts and acquire new customers. We keep up to eighteen months of inventory on hand for long lead-time components to mitigate this risk, which we believe would give us enough time to resolve any shortage due to an issue with a particular supplier, but it might not be enough time to resolve a shortage that stems from resource scarcity. Any interruption of supply for any material components of our products could significantly delay the shipment of our products and have a material adverse effect on our revenue, profitability and financial condition. International or domestic geopolitical or other events, including the imposition of new or increased tariffs and/or quotas by the U.S. federal government on any of these raw materials or components, could adversely impact the supply and cost of these raw materials or components, and could adversely impact the profitability of our operations. Additionally, if we experience an unpredicted increase in customer demand, we might not be able to acquire enough materials to meet that demand in a timely manner.

Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates could materially affect our financial results.

Our financial statements are presented in U.S. dollars. For current and potential international customers whose contracts are denominated in U.S. dollars, the relative change in local currency values creates relative fluctuations in our product pricing. These changes in international end-user costs may result in lost orders and reduce the competitiveness of our solutions in certain foreign markets. Additionally, intercompany sales to our non-U.S. dollar functional currency international subsidiaries are transacted in U.S. dollars which could increase our foreign exchange rate risk caused by foreign currency transaction gains and losses.

For non-U.S. dollar denominated sales, weakening of foreign currencies relative to the U.S. dollar generally leads us to raise international pricing, potentially reducing demand for our solutions. Should we decide not to raise local prices to fully offset the U.S. dollar’s strengthening, the U.S. dollar value of our foreign currency denominated sales and earnings would be adversely affected. Fluctuations in foreign currency could result in a change in the U.S. dollar value of our foreign denominated assets and liabilities including accounts receivable. Therefore, the U.S. dollar equivalent collected on a given sale could be less than the amount invoiced causing the sale to be less profitable than contemplated.

We also import selected components which are used in the manufacturing of some of our hardware products. Although our purchase orders are generally in U.S. dollars, weakness in the U.S. dollar could lead to price increases for the components.

Approximately 40% of our expenses, primarily payroll and rent, are paid in Israeli new shekels (ILS). The U.S. dollar has generally weakened compared to the ILS over the last several years, which could have an adverse impact on our expenses and profitability. Although we take steps to hedge our foreign currency exposures related to our ILS expenses, there is no assurance that our hedging strategy will be successful.

The sales cycle for some of our solutions can be lengthy.

Most of our sales transactions involve a short sales cycle; however, larger transactions often involve a longer sales cycle and may require, for example, discussions about budget and which potential solution is most suitable to the customer. The larger the sale, the longer these consultations tend to last. If our sales efforts to a potential customer do not result in sufficient revenue to justify our time and investments, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected. We are currently expanding our sales of the DI Platform to customers, and so the impact of these longer sales cycles could become more significant over time.Because of the long approval process that typically accompanies strategic initiatives or capital expenditures by companies, our sales process may be delayed, with little or no control over any delays encountered by us.

If we are unable to retain qualified personnel and senior management, including Yossi Carmil, our Chief Executive Officer, and hire and retain additional qualified personnel, our business could suffer.

Our ability to compete in the highly competitive technology industry depends upon our ability to attract, motivate, and retain qualified personnel. We are highly dependent on the continued contributions and customer relationships of our management and particularly on the skills of Yossi Carmil, our Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Carmil has served as

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our Chief Executive Officer for seventeen years, and has been integral to our growth over this period. We believe that Mr. Carmil’s management experience would be difficult to replace. All of our executive officers and key personnel are at-will employees and may terminate their employment relationship with us at any time. The loss of the services of our key personnel and any of our other executive officers, and our inability to find suitable replacements, could result in a decline in sales, delays in product development, and harm to our business and operations.

Our success also depends on our ability to effectively source and staff people with the right mix of skills and experience to perform services for our customers, including our ability to transition personnel to new assignments on a timely basis. If we are unable to effectively utilize our personnel on a timely basis to fulfill the needs of our customers, our business could suffer.

We face intense competition for qualified personnel, especially personnel in research and development. Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic has also caused a shift to virtual recruiting, which has increased the difficulty in timely attracting new employees, integrating and introducing them into our corporate culture and retaining them for the longer term. Larger companies with whom we compete have expended and will likely continue to expend more resources than we do on employee recruitment and are often better able to offer more favorable compensation and incentive packages than we can. Further, many of the companies with which we compete for qualified personnel have greater resources than we have. We seek to retain and motivate existing personnel through our compensation practices, company culture, and career development opportunities. If we fail to attract new personnel or to retain our current personnel, our business and operations could be harmed.

Furthermore, retention is an industry-wide issue given the competitive technology labor market and as the millennial workforce continues to value multiple company experience over long tenure. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a limited pool of qualified personnel and at, present, such personnel are in short supply. For example, over the past fiscal year we have experienced an increase in competition for recruiting qualified research and development teams and engineers in Israel where we have a substantial presence and need for skilled employees. Furthermore, if we experience high turnover of our research and development personnel, a lack of managerial resources to guide our research and development, or a lack of other research and development resources, we may miss or fail to execute on new product development and strategic opportunities and consequently lose potential and actual market share. The success of our business is dependent on our research and development teams developing and executing on a product roadmap that allows us to retain and increase the spending of our existing customers and attract new customers. A failure to continue offering the same caliber of solutions and to effectively meet our customers’ needs due to a loss of key personnel could therefore adversely affect our business and results of operations.

Certain of our key employees participate in a share option plan and receive options to purchase Ordinary Shares. If there is volatility in the trading price of Ordinary Shares, this may also affect our ability to attract and retain qualified personnel. Personnel may be more likely to leave us if the Ordinary Shares they own have significantly depreciated in value relative to the original purchase price of these shares or the exercise price of the options, or conversely, if the exercise price of the options that they hold are significantly above the trading price. In addition, some of our personnel may receive significant proceeds from sales of Ordinary Shares in the public markets, which may reduce their motivation to continue to work for us. Any of these factors could harm our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

The security of our operations and the integrity of our software solutions are critical to our operations and to maintaining the trust and confidence of our customers.

We have established practices and procedures intended to protect the security, integrity, availability and confidentiality of our systems and the integrity of our software solutions. However, there can be no assurance that such measures will prevent all malicious activities, including deliberate insertion of exploitative code, malware or cyberattacks, or inadvertent disclosures (including of personal or confidential business information) or unauthorized access, from impacting our system and information. We monitor new technological developments and new threats, and consistently update our software as needed to enhance its security. We may experience breaches of our security due to human error, malfeasance, system errors or vulnerabilities, or other irregularities. As the techniques used to obtain unauthorized access change frequently, we may be unable to anticipate these techniques or to implement adequate preventative measures. Although to date, malicious activities directed at us have not had a material impact on our business nor, to our knowledge, have they impacted the integrity of the data that our solutions extract from devices, future malicious activities could compromise our solutions and cause us to incur liabilities that may have a material

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adverse impact on our reputation and business. While we maintain insurance coverage that we believe is adequate for our business, such coverage may not cover all potential costs and expenses associated with incidents that may occur in the future.

Cellebrite may be materially adversely affected by negative publicity related to its business and use of its products.

From time to time, political and public sentiment could result in a significant amount of adverse press coverage and other adverse public statements affecting Cellebrite for the reasons described elsewhere in this section. For example, our main Manage solution, Guardian, which utilizes a Cloud/SaaS delivery model may face negative public or political sentiment because of perceived data security concerns. Moreover, adverse press coverage and other negative publicity, whether or not driven by political or public sentiment, may also result in investigations by regulators, legislators and law enforcement officials or ultimately in legal claims. Responding to these investigations and lawsuits, regardless of the ultimate outcome of the proceeding, can divert the time and effort of senior management from the management of Cellebrite’s businesses. Addressing any adverse publicity, governmental scrutiny or enforcement or other legal proceedings is time consuming and expensive and, regardless of the factual basis for the assertions being made, can have a negative impact on Cellebrite’s reputation, on the morale and performance of our employees and on our relationships with regulators. It may also have an adverse impact on our ability to take timely advantage of various business and market opportunities. The direct and indirect effects of negative publicity, and the demands of responding to and addressing it, may have a material adverse effect on our businesses, financial condition and results of operations.

Risks Related to the Businesses of Cellebrite’s Customers

Our sales to government customers expose us to business volatility and risks, including government budgeting cycles and appropriations, early termination, audits, investigations, sanctions and penalties.

We generate revenue from contracts with federal, state, provincial and local governments of several countries, and these government customers may terminate most of these contracts at any time, without cause. There is increased pressure on some governments and their agencies, both domestically and internationally, to reduce spending. Further, the U.S. federal government contracts are subject to the approval of appropriations made by the U.S. Congress to fund the expenditures under these contracts. Similarly, our contracts with U.S. state and local governments, Canadian federal, provincial and local governments and other foreign governments and their agencies are generally subject to government funding authorizations. Additionally, government contracts are generally subject to audits and investigations which could result in various civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions, including termination of contracts, refund of a portion of fees received, forfeiture of profits, suspension of payments, fines and suspensions or debarment from future government business.

A decline in government budgets, changes in spending or budgetary priorities, or delays in contract awards may significantly and adversely affect our future revenue and limit our growth prospects.

We generated approximately 90% of our revenue in 2019, 2020 and 2021 from contracts with governments and government agencies, and our results of operations could be adversely affected by government spending caps or changes in government budgetary priorities, as well as by delays in the government budget process, program starts, or the award of contracts or orders under existing contract vehicles. Further, these government clients may terminate most of these contracts at any time, without cause and face increased pressure to reduce spending see “— Risks Related to Our Business and Industry —.” We are materially dependent on acceptance of our solutions by law enforcement markets and government agencies, both domestic and international. If law enforcement and other government agencies do not continue to purchase, accept and use our solutions, our revenue will be adversely affected.” Future spending and program authorizations may not increase or may decrease or shift to programs in areas in which we do not provide services or are less likely to be awarded contracts. We face these risks in every country in which we operate.

Revenues from the U.S. federal government customers comprised of 20% of our total revenue in 2021. When the U.S. Congress does not complete a budget before the end of the fiscal year, government operations typically are funded through one or more continuing resolutions that authorize agencies of the U.S. federal government to continue to operate consistent with funding levels from the prior year’s appropriated amounts, but do not authorize new spending initiatives. When the U.S. federal government operates under a continuing resolution, contract awards may be delayed, canceled, or funded at lower levels, which could adversely impact our business, financial condition, and results of operations. If appropriations or continuing resolutions for the U.S. federal government departments and agencies with

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which we work or have prospective business are not made by September 30 (the last day of the federal fiscal year) of any given year, the lapse in appropriations may also have negative impacts on our ability to continue work and to recognize revenue from those customers, for so long as the lapse continues.

The U.S. federal government may also shift spending away from one or more of the federal agencies from which we derive much of our revenue, such as Immigration and Customs Enforcement, for budgetary or political reasons. A significant decline in overall U.S. federal government spending, a significant shift in spending priorities, the substantial reduction or elimination of particular law enforcement-related programs, or significant budget-related delays in contract or task order awards for large programs could adversely affect our future revenue and limit our growth prospects.

Evolving government procurement policies and increased emphasis on cost over performance could adversely affect our business.

A significant majority of our customers are in the public sector. The procurement process for government agencies can be more challenging than contracting in the private sector and can impose additional costs and complicate sales efforts. Further, changes in the political landscape or required procurement procedures that affect our target customers could be introduced prior to the completion of our sales cycle, making it more difficult or costly to finalize a contract with a new customer or expand or renew an existing customer relationship. For example, customers may require a competitive bidding process with extended response deadlines, review or appeal periods, or customer attention may be diverted to other government matters, postponing the consideration of the purchase of our solutions. Such delays could harm our ability to provide our solutions efficiently and to grow or maintain our customer base. In addition, the majority of our government contracts include the right for government agencies to delay, curtail, renegotiate or terminate contracts and subcontracts at their convenience any time prior to their completion. Any decision by a government customer to exercise any of these rights in our contracts may result in a decline in our profits and revenue.

Changes in civil forfeiture laws may affect our customers’ ability to purchase our solutions.

Many of our law enforcement customers in the United States use funds seized through civil forfeiture proceedings to fund the purchase of our solutions. State civil forfeiture statutes permit state governments to seize property with limited judicial oversight, often based on a preponderance of the evidence that the property was connected to criminal activity even if the owner of the property is not subject to criminal charges. A one-justice U.S. Supreme Court opinion in March 2017 sharply criticized civil forfeiture as possibly violating the due process clause of the U.S. Constitution, although the U.S. Supreme Court in that instance declined to hear the case on procedural grounds. An adverse U.S. Supreme Court decision or changes in state legislation could impact our customers’ ability to seize funds or use seized funds to fund purchases. Changes in civil forfeiture statutes or regulations are outside of our control and could limit the amount of funds available to our customers, which could adversely affect the sale of our solutions.

Our revenue from private sector customers could be adversely affected by any weakening of economic conditions.

Our private sector customers may be more susceptible to weakening economic conditions than our public sector customers. Certain economies have experienced periods of downturn as a result of a multitude of factors, including, but not limited to, turmoil in the credit and financial markets, concerns regarding the stability and viability of major financial institutions, declines in gross domestic product, increases in unemployment, volatility in commodity prices and worldwide stock markets, excessive government debt and disruptions to global trade or tariffs. The severity and length of time that a downturn in economic and financial market conditions may persist, as well as the timing, strength and sustainability of any recovery, are unknown and are beyond our control. Recently, COVID-19 has raised additional concerns regarding economic uncertainties. Moreover, any instability in the global economy affects countries in different ways, at different times and with varying severity, which makes the impact to our business complex and unpredictable. During such downturns, many customers may delay or reduce technology purchases. Contract negotiations may become more protracted or conditions could result in reductions in the sales of our software, hardware and solutions, longer sales cycles, pressure on our margins, difficulties in collection of accounts receivable or delayed payments, increased default risks associated with our accounts receivables, slower adoption of new technologies and increased price competition. In addition, deterioration of the global credit markets could adversely impact our ability to complete licensing transactions and services transactions, including maintenance and support renewals. Any of these events, as well as a general weakening of, or declining corporate confidence in, the global economy, or a curtailment in corporate spending could delay or decrease our revenue and therefore have a material adverse effect on our business, operating

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results and financial condition. For more information regarding the impact of COVID-19 on our business and global economic conditions, see “— Risks Related to Our Business and Industry — The ongoing global COVID-19 pandemic could negatively impact our business, installations, trainings, and general operations.”

Risks Related to Cellebrite’s Intellectual Property

Failure to adequately obtain, maintain, protect and enforce our intellectual property and other proprietary rights could adversely affect our business.

Our success and ability to compete depends in part on our ability to maintain, protect, enforce and defend our intellectual property and other proprietary rights. We rely upon a combination of copyright, trademark and trade secret laws, as well as certain contractual provisions, to establish, maintain, protect and enforce our intellectual property and other proprietary rights. Despite our efforts, third parties may attempt to disclose, obtain, copy, or use our intellectual property or other proprietary information or technology without our authorization, and our efforts to protect our intellectual property and other proprietary rights may not prevent such unauthorized disclosure or use, misappropriation, infringement, reverse engineering or other violation of our intellectual property or other proprietary rights. Effective protection of our rights may not be available to us in every country in which our platform or solutions are available. The laws of some countries may not be as protective of intellectual property and other proprietary rights as those in Israel or the United States, and mechanisms for enforcement of intellectual property and other proprietary rights may be inadequate. Also, our involvement in standard setting activity or the need to obtain licenses from others may require us to license our intellectual property. Accordingly, despite our efforts, we may be unable to prevent third parties from using our intellectual property or other proprietary information or technology. The violation of our end-user license agreement by transferring or allowing the use of our proprietary information or technology without a license may pose additional risks.

In addition, we may be the subject of intellectual property infringement or misappropriation claims, which could be very time-consuming and expensive to settle or litigate and could divert our management’s attention and other resources. These claims could also subject us to significant liability for damages if we are found to have infringed patents, copyrights, trademarks, or other intellectual property rights, or breached trademark co-existence agreements or other intellectual property licenses and could require us to cease using or to rebrand all or portions of our platform.

Any of our intellectual property rights may be challenged, narrowed, invalidated, held unenforceable, or circumvented in litigation or other proceedings, including, where applicable, opposition, re-examination, inter partes review, post-grant review, interference, nullification and derivation proceedings, and equivalent proceedings in foreign jurisdictions, and such intellectual property or other proprietary rights may be lost or no longer provide us meaningful competitive advantages. Such proceedings may result in substantial cost and require significant time from our management, even if the eventual outcome is favorable to us.

While we currently have no outstanding patents, we may in the future determine that we require patents in order to protect our software and processes, and we may be unable to obtain patent protection for the technology covered in our patent applications or such patent protection may not be obtained quickly enough to meet our business needs. Furthermore, the patent prosecution process is expensive, time-consuming, and complex, and we may not be able to prepare, file, prosecute, maintain, and enforce all necessary or desirable patent applications at a reasonable cost or in a timely manner. The scope of patent protection also can be reinterpreted after issuance and issued patents may be invalidated. Even if our patent applications do issue as patents, they may not issue in a form that is sufficiently broad to protect our technology, prevent competitors or other third parties from competing with us or otherwise provide us with any competitive advantage.

Third parties may legitimately and independently develop products, services, and technology similar to or duplicative of our platform. In addition to protection under intellectual property laws, we rely on confidentiality or license agreements that we generally enter into with our corporate partners, employees, consultants, advisors, vendors, and customers, and generally limit access to and distribution of our proprietary information. However, we cannot be certain that we have entered into such agreements with all parties who may have or have had access to our confidential information or that the agreements we have entered into will not be breached or challenged, or that such breaches will be detected. Furthermore, non-disclosure provisions can be difficult to enforce, and even if successfully enforced, may not be entirely effective. We cannot guarantee that any of the measures we have taken will prevent infringement, misappropriation, or other violation of our technology or other intellectual property or proprietary rights.

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We may be subject to information technology system breaches, failures, or disruptions that could harm our operations, financial condition or reputation.

In the current environment, there are numerous and evolving risks to cybersecurity and privacy, including criminal hackers, hacktivists, state-sponsored intrusions, industrial espionage, employee malfeasance and human or technological error. High-profile security breaches at other companies and in government agencies have increased in frequency and sophistication in recent years. Although we take steps designed to secure our IT infrastructure and sensitive data and enhance our business continuity and disaster recovery capabilities, we can provide no assurance that our current IT system or any updates or upgrades thereto, the current or future IT systems of our distributors or re-sellers or the IT systems of online paying agents that we use or may use in the future, are fully protected against third-party intrusions, viruses, hacker attacks, information or data theft or other similar risks. We carry data protection liability insurance against cyber-attacks, with limits we deem adequate for the reimbursement for damage to our computers, equipment and networks and resulting disruption of our operations.

Because we have historically been targeted by cyberattacks and may continue to be an attractive target for cyberattacks, we also may have a heightened risk of unauthorized access to, and misappropriation of, our proprietary and competitively sensitive information. We carry data protection liability insurance against cyber attacks, with limits we deem adequate for the reimbursement for damage to our computers, equipment and networks and resulting disruption of our operations. Moreover, we spend significant resources to monitor and protect our intellectual property and other proprietary rights from cyberattacks and potential infringement, and in the future we may conclude that in at least some instances the benefits of protecting our intellectual property or other proprietary rights may be outweighed by the expense or distraction to our management. We may initiate claims or litigation against third parties for infringement, misappropriation, or other violation of our intellectual property or other proprietary rights or to establish the validity of our intellectual property or other proprietary rights. Any such litigation, whether or not it is resolved in our favor, could be time-consuming, result in significant expense to us and divert the efforts of our technical and management personnel. Furthermore, attempts to enforce our intellectual property rights against third parties could also provoke these third parties to assert their own intellectual property or other rights against us, or result in a holding that invalidates or narrows the scope of our rights, in whole or in part.

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, a greater number of our employees are working remotely and accessing our IT systems and networks remotely, which may further increase our vulnerability to cybercrimes and cyberattacks and increase the stress on our technology infrastructure and systems. Although we maintain data protection liability insurance, this insurance may not be sufficient to cover all of our losses from any future breaches or failures of our IT systems, networks and services.

Some of our software and systems contain open source software, which may pose particular risks to our proprietary software and information technology systems.

We utilize open source software in the development and application of our software solutions, and we will use open source software in the future. Such open source software is generally licensed by its authors or other third parties under open source licenses and is typically freely accessible, usable, and modifiable. Pursuant to such open source licenses, we may be subject to certain conditions, including requirements that we offer our proprietary software that incorporates the open source software for no cost, that we make available source code for modifications or derivative works we create based upon, utilizing open source software, and that we license such modifications or derivative works under the terms of the particular open source license. We may face claims from third parties claiming ownership of, or demanding the release or license of, the open source software or derivative works that we developed from such software (which could include our proprietary source code), or otherwise seeking to enforce the terms of the applicable open source license. These claims could result in litigation and could require us to purchase a costly license, publicly release the affected portions of our source code, or cease offering the implicated software unless and until we can re-engineer it to avoid infringement. We also may be required to re-engineer solutions if the license terms for incorporated open source software change. The re-engineering process of some or all of our software could require significant additional research and development resources, and we may not be able to complete it successfully. In addition, use of open source software can lead to greater risks than use of third-party commercial software because open source licensors generally do not provide warranties or controls on the origin of the software. Use of open source software may also present additional security risks because the public availability of such software may make it easier for hackers and

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other third parties to determine how to breach our website and systems that rely on open source software. These risks could be difficult to eliminate or manage and, if not addressed, could adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial conditions.

Other companies may claim that we infringe their intellectual property, which could materially increase costs and materially harm our ability to generate future revenue and profits.

Claims of infringement (including misappropriation and/or other intellectual property violation) are common in the software industry and increasing as related legal protections, including copyrights and patents, are applied to software solutions. Although most of our technology is proprietary in nature, we do include certain third party and open source software in our software solutions. In the case of third party software, we believe this software is licensed from the entity holding the intellectual property rights. While we believe that we have secured proper licenses for all material third-party intellectual property that is integrated into our solutions in a manner that requires a license, third parties have and may continue to assert infringement claims against us in the future, including the sometimes aggressive and opportunistic actions of non-practicing entities whose business model is to obtain patent-licensing revenue from operating companies such as us. Any such assertion, regardless of merit, may result in litigation or may require us to obtain a license for the intellectual property rights of third parties. Such licenses may not be available, or they may not be available on commercially reasonable terms. In addition, as we continue to develop software solutions and expand our portfolio using new technology and innovation, our exposure to threats of infringement may increase. Any infringement claims and related litigation could be time-consuming, expensive to settle or litigate, disruptive to our ability to generate revenue or enter into new market opportunities, could divert our management’s attention and other resources, and may result in significant liability for damages if we are found to have infringed third party rights, and/or significantly increased costs as a result of our defense against those claims or our attempt to license the intellectual property rights or rework or rebrand our solutions to avoid infringement of third party rights. Typically, our agreements with our partners and customers contain provisions which require us to indemnify them for damages sustained by them as a result of any infringement claims involving our solutions. Any of the foregoing infringement claims and related litigation could have a significant adverse impact on our business and operating results as well as our ability to generate future revenue and profits.

Risks Related to Data Privacy and Human Rights

Certain of our solutions may be perceived as, or determined by the courts to be, a violation of privacy rights and related laws. Any such perception or determination could adversely affect our revenue and results of operations.

Because of the nature of certain of our solutions, including those used for digital investigations, the general public could perceive that the deployment of our solutions may result in violations of individual privacy rights. In addition, certain courts or regulatory authorities could determine that the use of our software solutions is a violation of privacy laws. Any such determination or perception by potential customers, the general public, government entities or the judicial system could harm our reputation and adversely affect our revenue and results of operations. We are dedicating substantial resources to mitigate these risks by complying with applicable laws and requiring all licensees to comply with applicable laws and to refrain from violation of privacy rights, but we have been advised that even if we have no access to the data stored on a customer’s devices, we may still be held liable for manner in which the customer uses such data, including if the customer uses the data in a way that is a violation of privacy rights or related laws or our End User License Agreement (“EULA”).

Some of our solutions may be used by customers in a way that is, or that is perceived to be, incompatible with human rights. Any such perception could adversely affect our reputation, revenue and results of operations.

We strive to sell our solutions to customers who will use them in a lawful and ethical manner. See “— We may not enter into relationships with potential customers if we consider their activities to be inconsistent with our organizational mission or values.” For example, all users are required to confirm, before activation, that they will only use the system for lawful uses, but Cellebrite cannot verify that this undertaking is accurate. Further, some of our government customers may use our solutions in a manner that is incompatible with, or perceived to be incompatible with, human rights without our knowledge or permission. For example, in August 2020, a group of 61 petitioners, including a number of human rights activists, filed a petition before the District Court in Tel Aviv against various Israeli government entities and Cellebrite. The petition asked the District Court to exercise its power under the Defense Export Control Law to stop the exportation of our UFED solution to police forces in Hong Kong. Activists alleged

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that UFED was being used against pro-democracy protestors in Hong Kong and that this was resulting in human rights abuses. We have since stopped operating in China and Hong Kong and have proactively stopped selling to Russia, but this petition as well as petitions relating to Russia and Bangladesh and the corresponding media coverage may have negatively impacted our reputation. Our end user license agreements prohibit customers from using our products in a manner that violates applicable laws (including laws with respect to human rights and the rights of individuals) or in support of any illegal activity or to violate the rights of any third party, and require our customers to indemnify us for losses that we suffer due to their actions; however, we cannot provide any assurance that we will not be subject to claims from third parties alleging that their rights were infringed. In the future, other allegations of misuse by our customers may damage our reputation, even if we took no part in the misuse or take immediate action to sever ties with such customers.

We may not enter into relationships with potential customers if we consider their activities to be inconsistent with our organizational mission or values.

We generally do not enter into business with customers whose positions or actions we consider inconsistent with our mission to support law enforcement acting in a legal manner. We pursue only those customers who we believe will act lawfully and not in a manner incompatible with privacy rights or human rights. For example, we have chosen not to do business in Bangladesh, Belarus, China, Hong Kong, Macau, Russia and Venezuela partially due to concerns regarding human rights and data security, and we may in the future decide not to do business in other countries or with other potential customers for similar reasons.

A portion of our solutions are delivered to customers on-premise, as some of our customers require the hosting of their proprietary data within their own organization, and are operated by our customers without our involvement other than with respect to troubleshooting and support from time to time. As a result, we rely on a range of information sources, and largely depend on media and other reports, to learn if our products are being used inconsistent with our organizational mission and values. Third party reports may be incomplete, unreliable or unavailable. In addition, a determination as to whether our products are being misused may involve subjective determinations or being the subject of differing opinions. The Company has an Ethics and Integrity Committee, which serves as an advisory body to the board. The committee is comprised of approximately eight industry experts, which include ethics experts, legal experts, former members of the police force, former members of ministries of defense, technology experts, academic experts and community leaders. The role of the Ethics and Integrity Committee is to advise the board on matters pertaining to evolving international law, ethical considerations related to responsible business practices and requirements under law and regulations applied to the sale and use of our technologies.

The license to use our products prohibits customers from using our solutions in violation of applicable laws (including laws with respect to human rights and the rights of individuals) or in support of any illegal activity or to violate the rights of any third party. We may terminate any license, among other things, in the event of a material breach that is not cured after 30 days’ notice. In addition, we may disable the use of the software, among other things, if it is used in violation of the license. A determination regarding whether a breach of our license will result in termination or other corrective action involves judgment and depends on the facts and circumstances of each case.

We cannot be sure that the foregoing safeguards will be sufficient to identify misuse of our products or prevent any such misuse. Our decisions not to do business with these countries may alter our expectations surrounding our long-term financial benefits and results, which may harm our growth prospects, business, and results of operations. Although we endeavor to do business with customers and governments that are aligned with our mission and values, we cannot predict how the activities and values of our government and private sector customers will evolve over time, and they may evolve in a manner inconsistent with our mission.

We occasionally have limited access to third party data, and if our security measures are breached and unauthorized access to this data is obtained, our systems, data centers and our solutions may be perceived as not being secure, customers may curtail or stop using our service and we may incur significant legal and financial exposure and liabilities.

We do not generally store customer data nor have access to the data processed by customers using our solutions. Nevertheless, our service operators occasionally have brief and limited access to data, including personally identifiable information (“PII”), when they receive calls for technical support. When a customer calls for technical support, they sometimes grant our service operators remote access to their device, which may result in the brief sharing of data with

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the service operator. In rare cases the customer may share the data with the technical support for further bug fixing research and analysis. We have internal processes for deleting such data shortly after the completion of the customer support and ensuring bug fix is sustainable and consistent, but the data is still shared for these limited periods and could potentially be, or be perceived as, more vulnerable as a result. In addition, we may have access to customer data, including PII, in connection with the provision of our Advanced Services in which we serve as an outsourced lab for the extraction of data from devices that are sent to us by our customers. Any actual or perceived unauthorized access, use, disclosure or modification to this data, could result in our solutions being viewed as less secure, which could lead to liability and a significant adverse effect on our reputation and operating results.

Risks Related to Legal Compliance and Regulatory Matters

Our business is subject to complex and evolving U.S. and non-U.S. laws and regulations regarding privacy, data protection and security, technology protection, and other matters. Many of these laws and regulations are subject to change and uncertain interpretation, and could result in claims, changes to our business practices, monetary penalties, increased cost of operations, or otherwise harm our business.

Our products are mostly used as an on-premise solution and are generally operated by our customers without our involvement. Nevertheless, our service operators occasionally have brief and limited access to customer data, including PII, when they receive calls for technical support. In addition, we may extract files containing customer data, including PII, in connection with the provision of our Advanced Services in which we serve as an outsourced lab for the extraction of data from devices that are sent to us by our customers. In both of those situations, we do not access or view customer data, maintain such data securely with limited access, and delete all such data following the confirmation that the data has been received by the customer. As a result, for the purposes of the European General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) and the UK equivalent legislation, we are not considered to be a controller and serve as a processor in a number of circumstances, within the meaning of those terms.

Given the global nature of our operations, we are subject to a variety of local, state, national, and international laws and directives and regulations in the United States and abroad related to privacy and data protection, data security, data storage, retention, transfer and deletion, technology protection, and personal information, including:

•        GDPR took effect in May 2018 and applies to many of our products and services that provide service in Europe. The GDPR includes operational requirements for companies that receive or process personal data of residents of the EU. We are required to comply with the GDPR and, following the exit of the United Kingdom (“UK”) from the European Union (“EU”), the UK equivalent, the implementation of which exposes us to two parallel data protection regimes in Europe, each of which impose several stringent requirements for controllers and processors of personal data and could make it more difficult to and/or more costly for us to collect, store, use, transmit and process personal and sensitive data. In 2016, the EU and the U.S. agreed to an alternative transfer framework for data transferred from the EU to the United States called the Privacy Shield Framework. However, in 2020, the EU’s Court of Justice invalidated the use of this framework moving forward. The court ruled that the framework did not ensure an adequate level of protection for data transferred from the EU to the United States. Notably, there are alternative legal mechanisms available that allow the compliant transfer of data from the EU to the United States, however, they may also be challenged by national regulators or private parties. Non-compliance with the GDPR and the UK legislation equivalent may result in administrative fines or monetary penalties of up to 4% of worldwide annual revenue in the preceding financial year or €20 million (whichever is higher) for the most serious infringements, and could result in proceedings against us by governmental entities or other related parties and may otherwise adversely impact our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

•        The California Consumer Privacy Act, or the CCPA, went into effect on January 1, 2020 and became enforceable by the California Attorney General on July 1, 2020, along with related regulations that came into force on August 14, 2020. The CCPA gives California residents new rights to access and require deletion of their personal information, opt out of the sale of personal information, and receive detailed information about how their personal information is collected, used, and shared. The CCPA provides for civil penalties for violations, as well as a private right of action for security breaches that may increase security breach litigation. The effects of the CCPA potentially are significant and may require us to modify our data collection or processing practices and policies and to incur substantial costs and expenses in an effort to comply. Additionally, in November 2020, California voters passed the California Privacy

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Rights and Enforcement Act of 2020, or the CPRA. The CPRA will impose additional data protection obligations on companies doing business in California, including additional consumer rights processes and opt outs for certain uses of sensitive data and establishes a regulatory agency dedicated to enforcing those requirements. The majority of the provisions will go into effect on January 1, 2023, and additional compliance investment and potential business process changes may be required.

Certain other state laws in the United States impose similar privacy obligations and all 50 states have laws including obligations to provide notification of certain security breaches to affected individuals, state officials and others. For example, on March 2, 2021, Virginia enacted the Virginia Consumer Data Protection Act (“VCDPA”), creating the second truly comprehensive U.S. state privacy law, which will take effect on January 1, 2023 (the same day as CPRA takes effect). Further, there currently are also a number of proposals related to data privacy or security pending before federal, state, and foreign legislative and regulatory bodies, including in a number of states considering consumer protection laws similar to the CCPA and VCDPA. This legislation may add additional complexity, variation in requirements, restrictions and potential legal risk, require additional investment in resources to compliance programs, and could impact strategies and availability of previously useful data and could result in increased compliance costs and/or changes in business practices and policies. These developments may require us to review and amend the legal mechanisms by which we make and, or, receive personal data transfers from other countries to Israel. As data protection regulators issue further guidance on personal data export mechanisms, including circumstances where the standard contractual clauses cannot be used, and/or start taking enforcement action, we could suffer additional costs, complaints and/or regulatory investigations or fines, and/or if we are otherwise unable to transfer personal data between and among countries and regions in which we operate, it could affect the manner in which we provide our services, the geographical location or segregation of our relevant systems and operations, and could adversely affect our financial results.

These existing and proposed laws and regulations can be costly to comply with and can make our platform solutions less effective or valuable, delay or impede the development of new solutions, result in negative publicity, increase our operating costs, require us to modify our data handling practices, limit our operations, impose substantial fines and penalties, require significant management time and attention, or put our data or technology at risk. Any failure or perceived failure by us or our platform to comply with U.S., EU, UK or other foreign laws, regulations, directives, policies, industry standards, or legal obligations relating to privacy, data protection, or information security, or any security incident that results in loss of or the unauthorized access to, or acquisition, use, release, or transfer of, personal information, personal data, or other customer or sensitive data or information may result in governmental investigations, inquiries, enforcement actions and prosecutions, private claims and litigation, indemnification or other contractual obligations, other remedies, including fines or demands that we modify or cease existing business practices, or adverse publicity, and related costs and liabilities, which could significantly and adversely affect our business, reputation and results of operations.

We may in the future become involved in legal, regulatory, or administrative inquiries and proceedings, and unfavorable outcomes in litigation or other of these matters could negatively impact our business, financial conditions, and results of operations.

From time to time, we receive formal and informal inquiries from governmental agencies and regulators regarding our compliance with laws and regulations or otherwise relating to our business or transactions. We may also become subject to claims, lawsuits, proceedings and inquiries which could involve labor and employment disputes, discrimination and harassment allegations, commercial disputes, intellectual property rights (including patent, trademark, copyright, trade secret, and other proprietary rights), class actions, general contract, tort, or defamation, data privacy rights, antitrust concerns, common law fraud, government regulation, compliance, alleged federal and state securities and “blue sky” law violations or other investor related questions. Derivative claims, lawsuits, and proceedings, which may, from time to time, be asserted against our directors by our shareholders, could involve breach of fiduciary duty, breach of duty of loyalty, failure of oversight, corporate waste claims, and other matters. One of our shareholders, with respect to whom we are currently engaged in litigation as described in the notes to our consolidated financial statements, has threatened to bring various of these claims. In addition, our business and results may be adversely affected by the outcome of currently pending and any future legal, regulatory, and/or administrative claims or proceedings, including through monetary damages or injunctive relief. In addition, over the last several years, lawsuits have been filed against cyber-related companies by large multinationals that claim that their terms of use have been violated and breached by the activities of the cyber companies. While we are not a cyber company, such a risk could potentially also apply to us and our solutions.

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The number and significance of our legal disputes and inquiries may increase as we continue to grow larger, as our business has expanded in customer count and geographic reach, and as our platform solutions have become more complex. Additionally, if customers fail to pay us under the terms of our agreements, we may be adversely affected due to the cost of enforcing the terms of our contracts through litigation. Litigation or other proceedings can be expensive and time consuming and can divert our resources and leadership’s attention from our primary business operations. The results of our litigation also cannot be predicted with certainty. If we are unable to prevail in litigation, we could incur payments of substantial monetary damages or fines, or undesirable changes to our platform or business practices, and accordingly, our business, financial condition, or results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. Furthermore, if we accrue a loss contingency for pending litigation and determine that it is probable, any disclosures, estimates, and reserves we reflect in our financial statements with regard to these matters may not reflect the ultimate disposition or financial impact of litigation or other such matters. These proceedings could also result in negative publicity, which could harm customer and public perception of our business, regardless of whether the allegations are valid or whether we are ultimately found liable.

We have taken steps to mitigate the impact of any potential legal disputes, but the steps we have taken may not be enough to prevent damage to our reputation and financial results. Although we have limitation of liability provisions in our standard software licensing and service agreement terms and conditions, these provisions may not be enforceable in some circumstances, may vary in levels of protection across our agreements, or may not fully or effectively protect us from such claims and related liabilities and costs. We generally provide a warranty for our software and hardware solutions in our end-user license agreements (“EULAs”). In the event that there is a failure of warranties in such agreements, we are generally obligated to correct the product to conform to the warranty provision as set forth in the applicable EULA, or, if we are unable to do so, the customer is entitled to seek a refund of the purchase price of the product and service. The sale and support of our solutions also entail the risk of product liability claims. We maintain errors and omissions insurance to protect against certain claims associated with the use of our solutions, but our insurance coverage may not adequately cover any claim asserted against us. In addition, even claims that ultimately are unsuccessful could result in our expenditure of funds in litigation and divert management’s time and other resources.

We are subject to Israeli encryption laws and governmental trade controls, including export and regulations, and any noncompliance with these laws could negatively impact our operating results.

The export of our solutions is subject to Israeli encryption control laws. Our export license under the Israeli encryption control regime prohibits us from exporting of our products to customers in certain countries and require us to obtain the consent of the Ministry of Defense to export to customers in certain other countries. Our failure to comply with these requirements could subject us to financial and other penalties, and harm our reputation.

Although Israel is not a party to the Wassenaar Arrangement on Export Controls for Conventional Arms and Dual-Use Goods and Technologies (the “Wassenaar Arrangement”), it has adopted the Wassenaar Arrangement List of Dual Use Goods and Technologies and the goods and technologies listed therein are subject to Israeli export control laws and regulations. However, cryptography that is subject to Israeli encryption laws is not regulated under the Israeli export control regime, even if its capabilities would otherwise place it within Part 2 of Chapter 5 of the Wassenaar Arrangement Dual Use List which relates to Information Security. In 2016, the Israeli Ministry of Defense published draft regulations proposing to cancel the existing encryption control regime and to bring Part 2 of Chapter 5 of the Wassenaar Arrangement into full force and effect in its place. If our solutions do become subject to the Wassenaar Arrangement dual use list as adopted by Israel, then they likely will be controlled under either the Israeli Defense Export Control Law, 5767-2007 or the Import and Export Order (Export Control over Dual Use Goods, Services and Technology), 5766-2006, depending on the nature of the customer. The application of these requirements to us could subject us to different licensing requirements and may require us to adapt our marketing and export practices to accommodate this change. This development could adversely impact our ability to sell our products.

In addition, various other countries regulate the import of certain encryption solutions and technology, including import permitting and licensing requirements, and have enacted laws that could limit our ability to distribute our solutions or could limit our customers’ ability to implement our solutions in those countries. Any new export restrictions, new import restrictions, new legislation, changes in economic sanctions, or shifting approaches in the enforcement or scope of existing regulations, or in the countries, persons, or technologies targeted by such regulations, could result in decreased use of our platform by existing customers with non-U.S. operations, declining adoption of our platform by new customers with non-U.S. operations, limitation of our expansion into new markets, and decreased revenue.

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Our activities may be subject to certain economic sanctions laws including the laws of the Israel and the United States. We have adopted policies and procedures to restrict sales to countries subject to comprehensive U.S. and Israeli sanctions and to designated entities and individuals. Our solutions and technologies could be exported to these sanctioned targets by our resellers despite the contractual undertakings they have given us and any such export could have negative consequences, including government investigations, penalties and reputational harm. Any change in export regulations, economic sanctions or related legislation, shift in the enforcement or scope of existing regulations, or change in the countries, governments, persons or technologies targeted by such regulations, could result in decreased use of our solutions by, or in our decreased ability to export or sell our solutions to, existing or potential customers with international operations. Any decreased use of our solutions or limitation on our ability to export or sell our solutions would likely adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Differing regulatory and legal requirements and the possible enactment of additional regulations or restrictions on the use, import, or re-export of our platforms or the provision of services, could delay, restrict, or prevent the sale or use of our platform and solutions in some jurisdictions. If we or our business partners or counterparties, including licensors and licensees, prime contractors, subcontractors, sublicensors, vendors, customers, shipping partners, or contractors, fail to obtain appropriate import, export, or re-export licenses or permits, notwithstanding regulatory requirements or contractual commitments to do so, or if we fail to secure such contractual commitments where necessary, we may also be adversely affected, through reputational harm as well as other negative consequences, including government investigations and penalties.

These laws and regulations are subject to change over time and thus we must continue to monitor and dedicate resources to ensure continued compliance. Although we take precautions to prevent our software from being provided in violation of such laws, the software could be provided inadvertently in violation of such laws, despite the precautions we take. Non-compliance with applicable regulations or requirements could subject us to investigations, sanctions, enforcement actions, disgorgement of profits, fines, damages, civil and criminal penalties, or injunctions. If any governmental sanctions are imposed, or if we do not prevail in any possible civil or criminal litigation, our business, operating results, and financial condition could be materially adversely affected. We may also be adversely affected through penalties, reputational harm, loss of access to certain markets, or otherwise. In addition, responding to any action will likely result in a significant diversion of management’s attention and resources and an increase in professional fees. Enforcement actions and sanctions could harm our business, operating results and financial condition.

Our largest shareholder, SUNCORPORATION, is a Japanese public company and currently a holder of 50.7% of Cellebrite’s outstanding shares.

As of December 31, 2021 SUNCORPORATION (TSE JASDAQ: 6736), a Japanese public company, beneficially owns 50.7% of our Ordinary Shares. Therefore, SUNCORPORATION has significant influence on the outcome of all decisions at our shareholders’ meetings including:

•        the election of our board of directors;

•        amendments to our articles of association; and

•        our ability to enter into a change of control transaction.

SUNCORPORATION’s decisions as to how it votes its Ordinary Shares may be contrary to your expectations or preferences. The influence exerted by SUNCORPORATION may limit your ability as an investor to influence corporate matters and could also discourage other companies from pursuing any potential merger, takeover, or other change of control transactions with us. Further, SUNCORPORATION is a controlling shareholder and controls elections to our board of directors and, therefore, our general corporate activities.

A variety of new and existing laws and/or interpretations could materially and adversely affect our business.

We are subject to a variety of laws and regulations in Israel and abroad that involve matters central to our business, including privacy, data protection and personal information, rights of publicity, content, intellectual property, advertising, marketing, distribution, data security, data retention and deletion, electronic contracts and other communications, competition, consumer protection, telecommunications, product liability, taxation, labor and employment, economic or other trade prohibitions or sanctions, securities law compliance, and online payment

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services. The introduction of new solutions, expansion of our business to certain jurisdictions, or other actions that we may take may subject us to additional laws, regulations, or other government scrutiny. In addition, foreign data protection, privacy, content, competition, and other laws and regulations can impose different obligations or be more restrictive than those in Israel or the United States. These laws and regulations, which in some cases can be enforced by private parties in addition to government entities, are constantly evolving and can be subject to significant change. As a result, the application, interpretation, and enforcement of these laws and regulations are often uncertain and may be interpreted and applied inconsistently from country to country and inconsistently with our current policies and practices. New laws and regulations (or new interpretations of existing laws and regulations) may require us to incur substantial costs, expose us to unanticipated civil or criminal liability, or cause us to change our business practices. The costs of compliance with these laws and regulation are high and are likely to increase in the future. Additionally, these laws and regulations, or any associated inquiries or investigations or other government actions, may delay or impede the development of new solutions, result in negative publicity, require significant management time and attention, and subject us to remedies that may harm our business, including fines or demands or orders that we modify or cease existing business practices.

Failure to comply with laws, regulations, or contractual provisions applicable to our business could cause us to lose government customers or our ability to contract with the U.S. and other governments.

As a government contractor, we must comply with laws, regulations, and contractual provisions relating to the formation, administration, and performance of government contracts and inclusion on government contract vehicles, which affect how we and our partners do business with government agencies. As a result of actual or perceived non-compliance with government contracting laws, regulations, or contractual provisions, we may be subject to audits and internal investigations which may prove costly to our business financially, divert management time, or limit our ability to continue selling our platform and solutions to our government customers. Further, regulatory requirements imposed by foreign governments may be more stringent and non-compliance may subject us to investigations, proceedings, sanctions, or other consequences. These consequences remain uncertain because of the dynamic nature of governmental action and responses. These laws and regulations may impose other added costs on our business, and failure to comply with these or other applicable regulations and requirements, including non-compliance in the past, could lead to claims for damages from our channel partners, penalties, and termination of contracts and suspension or debarment from government contracting for a period of time with government agencies. Any such damages, penalties, disruption, or limitation in our ability to do business with a government could adversely impact, and could have a material adverse effect on, our business, results of operations, financial condition, public perception, and growth prospects.

Risks Relating to Cellebrite’s Incorporation and Location in Israel

Conditions in Israel could materially and adversely affect our business.

Many of our employees, including certain management members, operate from our offices that are located in Israel. In addition, a number of our officers and directors are residents of Israel and we have a small assembly facility in Israel. Accordingly, political, economic, and military conditions in Israel and the surrounding region may directly affect our business and operations. In recent years, Israel has been engaged in sporadic armed conflicts with terrorist and military groups. Further certain countries have threatened Israel and may be developing nuclear weapons. In recent years, some of these hostilities were accompanied by missiles being fired from the Gaza Strip against civilian targets in various parts of Israel, including areas in which our employees and some of our consultants are located, and potentially negatively affected business conditions in Israel. Any hostilities involving Israel or the interruption or curtailment of trade between Israel and its trading partners could adversely affect our operations and results of operations.

Our commercial insurance does not cover losses that may occur as a result of events associated with war and terrorism. Although the Israeli government currently covers the reinstatement value of direct damages that are caused by terrorist attacks or acts of war, we cannot assure you that this government coverage will be maintained or that it will sufficiently cover our potential damages. Any losses or damages incurred by us could have a material adverse effect on our business. Any armed conflicts or political instability in the region would likely negatively affect business conditions and could harm our results of operations.

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Further, in the past, the State of Israel and Israeli companies have been subjected to economic boycotts. Several countries still restrict business with the State of Israel and with Israeli companies. These restrictive laws and policies may have an adverse impact on our operating results, financial condition or the expansion of our business. A campaign of boycotts, divestment and sanctions has been undertaken against Israel, which could also adversely impact our business.

In addition, many Israeli citizens are obligated to perform several days, and in some cases more, of annual military reserve duty each year until they reach the age of 40 (or older, for reservists who are military officers or who have certain occupations) and, in the event of a military conflict and/or national civil emergencies, may be called to active duty. In response to increases in terrorist activity, there have been periods of significant call-ups of military reservists. It is possible that there will be military reserve duty call-ups in the future. Our operations could be disrupted by such call-ups, which may include the call-up of members of our management. Such disruption could materially adversely affect our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

It may be difficult to enforce a U.S. judgment against us, our officers and directors or the experts named in this prospectus in Israel or the United States, or to assert U.S. securities laws claims in Israel or serve process on our officers and directors or experts.

Most of our directors or officers are not residents of the United States and most of their and our assets are located outside the United States. Most of the experts named in this prospectus are also not residents of the United States. Service of process upon us or our non-U.S. resident directors and officers, and the experts named in this prospectus, and enforcement of judgments obtained in the United States against us or our non-U.S. our directors and executive officers or such experts may be difficult to obtain within the United States. We have been informed by our legal counsel in Israel that it may be difficult to assert claims under U.S. securities laws in original actions instituted in Israel or obtain a judgment based on the civil liability provisions of U.S. federal securities laws. Israeli courts may refuse to hear a claim based on a violation of U.S. securities laws against us or our non-U.S. officers and directors because Israel may not be the most appropriate forum to bring such a claim. In addition, even if an Israeli court agrees to hear a claim, it may determine that Israeli law and not U.S. law is applicable to the claim. If U.S. law is found to be applicable, the content of applicable U.S. law must be proved as a fact, typically through an expert witness, which can be a time-consuming and costly process. Certain matters of procedure will also be governed by Israeli law. There is little binding case law in Israel addressing the matters described above. Israeli courts might not enforce judgments rendered outside of Israel, which may make it difficult to collect on judgments rendered outside of Israel against us or our non-U.S. officers and directors.

Moreover, an Israeli court will not enforce a non-Israeli judgment if it was given in a state whose laws do not provide for the enforcement of judgments of Israeli courts (subject to exceptional cases), if its enforcement is likely to prejudice the sovereignty or security of the State of Israel, if it was obtained by fraud or in the absence of due process, if it is at variance with another valid judgment that was given in the same matter between the same parties, or if a suit in the same matter between the same parties was pending before a court or tribunal in Israel at the time the foreign action was brought.

Your rights and responsibilities as our shareholder are governed by Israeli law, which may differ in some respects from the rights and responsibilities of shareholders of U.S. corporations.

We are incorporated under Israeli law. The rights and responsibilities of holders of Ordinary Shares are governed by our amended and restated articles of association (the “Amended Articles”) and the Israeli Companies Law (the “Companies Law). These rights and responsibilities differ in some respects from the rights and responsibilities of shareholders in typical U.S. corporations. In particular, pursuant to the Companies Law, each shareholder of an Israeli company has to act in good faith and in a customary manner in exercising his, her or its rights and fulfilling his, her or its obligations toward the Company and other shareholders and to refrain from abusing his, her or its power in the Company, including, among other things, in voting at the general meeting of shareholders, on one of the following: (i) amendments to a company’s articles of association, (ii) increases in a company’s authorized share capital, (iii) mergers and (iv) certain transactions requiring shareholders’ approval under the Companies Law. In addition, a controlling shareholder of an Israeli company or a shareholder who knows that it possesses the power to determine the outcome of a shareholder vote or who has the power according to the Amended Articles to appoint or prevent the appointment of a director or officer in the Company, or has other powers toward the Company according to the

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Amended Articles, has a duty of fairness toward the Company. However, Israeli law does not define the substance of this duty of fairness. There is little case law available to assist in understanding the implications of these provisions that govern shareholder behavior.

Provisions in the Amended Articles may have the effect of discouraging lawsuits against us and our directors and officers.

Under the Amended Articles, the competent courts of Tel Aviv, Israel are the exclusive forum for (i) any derivative action or proceeding brought on behalf of Cellebrite, (ii) any action asserting a claim of breach of fiduciary duty or a claim of breach of the duty of loyalty owed by any of Cellebrite’s directors, officers or other employees or our shareholders, or (iii) any action asserting a claim arising pursuant to any provision of the Companies Law or the Israeli Securities Law.

Additionally, unless Cellebrite consents in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the U.S. federal courts shall be the exclusive forum for the resolution of any complaint asserting a cause of action arising under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) against us or any of our directors, officers, other employees or agents. Section 22 of the Securities Act, however, creates concurrent jurisdiction for U.S. federal and state courts over all suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Securities Act or the rules and regulations thereunder. Accordingly, there is uncertainty as to whether a court would enforce such provisions, and the enforceability of similar choice of forum provisions in other companies’ charter documents has been challenged in legal proceedings. While Delaware and certain U.S. courts have determined that such exclusive forum provisions are facially valid, a shareholder may nevertheless seek to bring a claim in a venue other than those designated in the exclusive forum provisions, and there can be no assurance that such provisions will be enforced by a court in those other jurisdictions. Any person or entity purchasing or otherwise acquiring any interest in our securities shall be deemed to have notice of and consented to these provisions; however, we note that investors cannot waive compliance with the federal securities laws and the rules and regulations thereunder.

Section 27 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), creates exclusive federal jurisdiction over all suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Exchange Act or the rules and regulations thereunder. Accordingly, notwithstanding the foregoing, the Amended Articles provide that the exclusive forum provision will not apply to suits brought to enforce a duty or liability created by the Exchange Act or any other claim for which the federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction.

These exclusive forum provisions may limit a shareholders ability to bring a claim in a judicial forum of its choosing for disputes with us or our directors or other employees which may discourage lawsuits against us, our directors, officers and employees.

Risks Relating to an Investment in our Securities

Future resales of the Ordinary Shares issued in connection with the Business Combination may cause the market price of the Ordinary Shares to drop significantly, even if Cellebrite’s business is doing well.

In connection with the Business Combination, each of Cellebrite, TWC and certain Cellebrite shareholders entered into the Sponsor Support Agreement, which contains a lock-up on the resale of certain Ordinary Shares by TWC’s sponsor, TWC Tech Holdings II, LLC (the “Sponsor”), as well as these other parties. Additionally, our Amended Articles contain various lock-ups lock-ups on the resale of Ordinary Shares held by Company shareholders.

Concurrently with the Closing, the Sponsor entered into the Investor Rights Agreement, which provided the Sponsor and the other parties thereto with customary demand registration rights and piggy-back registration rights with respect to registration statements filed by Cellebrite. In accordance with this and certain obligations relating to the PIPE Investment, we filed the Registration Statement.

We have also historically used, and continue to use, our Ordinary Shares as a means of both rewarding our employees, non-employee directors, and consultants and aligning their interests with those of our shareholders. As of December 31, 2021, 27,531,421 Ordinary Shares were subject to outstanding awards (consisting of outstanding options to purchase 25,487,897 Ordinary Shares and 2,043,524 Ordinary Shares underlying unvested restricted share units (“RSUs”)) granted to our affiliates’ respective employees, non-employee directors, consultants and former employees under our equity incentive plans, and 1,871,687 Ordinary Shares were available for grant under our equity

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incentive plans or for future purchase under our 2021 Employee Share Purchase Plan (“ESPP”), subject to increase under the evergreens terms of certain of those plans. All of the underlying Ordinary Shares are registered on Form S-8 for immediate sale or resale. Thus, Ordinary Shares granted or issued under our equity incentive plans will, subject to vesting provisions, lock-up restrictions, and applicable Rule 144 volume limitations, be available for sale in the open market immediately upon registration.

Upon expiration of the applicable lock-up period, in a registered offering of securities pursuant to the Securities Act (including via the registration statement on Form S-8) or otherwise in accordance with Rule 144 under the Securities Act, the Cellebrite employees and other shareholders may sell large amounts of Ordinary Shares in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions, which could have the effect of increasing the volatility in the trading price of the Ordinary Shares or putting significant downward pressure on the price of the Ordinary Shares. Further, sales of Ordinary Shares upon expiration of the applicable lockup period could encourage short sales by market participants. Generally, short selling means selling a security, contract or commodity not owned by the seller. The seller is committed to eventually purchase the financial instrument previously sold. Short sales are used to capitalize on an expected decline in the security’s price. As such, short sales of Ordinary Shares could have a tendency to depress the price of the Ordinary Shares, which could increase the potential for short sales.

We cannot predict the size of future issuances of Ordinary Shares or the effect, if any, that future issuances and sales of Ordinary Shares will have on the market price of the Ordinary Shares. Sales of substantial amounts of Ordinary Shares (including those shares issued in connection with the Business Combination), or the perception that such sales could occur, may materially and adversely affect prevailing market prices of Ordinary Shares.

As a “foreign private issuer” under applicable securities laws and regulations, Cellebrite is permitted to, and may, file less or different information with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) than a company incorporated in the United States, and will follow certain home country governance practices in lieu of certain Nasdaq requirements applicable to U.S. issuers.

Cellebrite is considered a “foreign private issuer” under the Exchange Act and is therefore exempt from certain rules under the Exchange Act. Moreover, Cellebrite is not required to file periodic reports and financial statements with the SEC as frequently or within the same time frames as U.S. issuers with securities registered under the Exchange Act, and is not subject to the rules prescribing the furnishing and content of proxy statements (including the requirement applicable to emerging growth companies to disclose the compensation of its Chief Executive Officer and the other two most highly compensated executive officers on an individual, rather than an aggregate, basis). Cellebrite is not required to comply with Regulation FD, which imposes restrictions on the selective disclosure of material information to shareholders. In addition, Cellebrite’s officers, directors and principal shareholders are exempt from the reporting and short-swing profit recovery provisions of Section 16 of the Exchange Act and the related rules under the Exchange Act with respect to their purchases and sales of Cellebrite’s equity securities. Accordingly, if you own Cellebrite’s securities, you may receive less or different information about Cellebrite than that you would receive about a U.S. issuer.

In addition, as a “foreign private issuer” whose securities are listed on Nasdaq, Cellebrite is permitted to follow certain home country corporate governance practices in lieu of certain Nasdaq requirements. A “foreign private issuer” must disclose in its annual reports filed with the SEC each Nasdaq requirement with which it does not comply, followed by a description of its applicable home country practice. Cellebrite currently intends to follow the corporate governance requirements of Nasdaq. However, Cellebrite cannot make any assurances that it will continue to follow such corporate governance requirements in the future, and may therefore in the future, rely on available Nasdaq exemptions that would allow Cellebrite to follow its home country practice. Unlike the requirements of Nasdaq, there are currently no mandatory corporate governance requirements in Israel that would require Cellebrite to (i) have a majority of its board of directors be independent, (ii) establish a nominating/governance committee, or (iii) hold regular executive sessions where only independent directors may be present. Such Israeli home country practices may afford less protection to holders of Cellebrite securities.

Cellebrite currently relies on this “foreign private issuer exemption” only with respect to the quorum requirement for shareholder meetings and the requirement regarding distribution of annual and interim reports, as follows:

•        Quorum requirement.    As permitted under the Companies Law, pursuant to our Amended Articles, the quorum required for an ordinary meeting of shareholders consists of at least two shareholders present in person, by proxy or by other voting instrument in accordance with the Companies Law, who hold at least

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25% of the voting power of our shares (and in an adjourned meeting, with some exceptions, any number of shareholders). Those minimal attendance levels are lower than 33 1/3% of the issued share capital, which is the minimal quorum permitted under the corporate governance rules of Nasdaq.

•        Distribution of Annual and Interim Reports.    Unlike Nasdaq Rule 5250(d), which requires listed issuers to make annual reports on Form 20-F available to shareholders in one of a number of specific manners, Israeli law does not require us to distribute such reports directly to shareholders, and the generally accepted business practice in Israel is not to distribute such reports to shareholders but to make such reports available through a public website. In addition, we will make our annual report on Form 20-F containing audited financial statements available to our shareholders at our offices (in addition to a public website).

Cellebrite otherwise complies with and intends to continue to comply with the rules generally applicable to U.S. domestic companies listed on Nasdaq. In addition, with respect to SEC rules, Cellebrite expects to issue interim quarterly financial information publicly and to furnish them to the SEC under cover of Form 6-K. Cellebrite may, however, in the future decide to rely upon the “foreign private issuer exemption” for purposes of opting out of some or all of the other Nasdaq corporate governance rules.

Cellebrite could lose its status as a “foreign private issuer” under applicable securities laws and regulations if more than 50% of Cellebrite’s outstanding voting securities become directly or indirectly held of record by U.S. holders and any one of the following is true: (i) the majority of Cellebrite’s directors or executive officers are U.S. citizens or residents; (ii) more than 50% of Cellebrite’s assets are located in the United States; or (iii) Cellebrite’s business is administered principally in the United States. If Cellebrite loses its status as a “foreign private issuer” in the future, it will no longer be exempt from the rules described above and, among other things, will be required to file periodic reports and annual and quarterly financial statements as if it were a company incorporated in the United States. If this were to happen, Cellebrite would likely incur substantial costs in fulfilling these additional regulatory requirements and members of Cellebrite’s management would likely have to divert time and resources from other responsibilities to ensuring these additional regulatory requirements are fulfilled.

Cellebrite is an “emerging growth company” and as a result of the reduced disclosure and governance requirements applicable to emerging growth companies, our securities may be less attractive to investors.

Cellebrite is an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act, and it intends to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Cellebrite cannot predict if investors will find its securities less attractive because it will rely on these exemptions, including delaying adoption of new or revised accounting standards until such time as those standards apply to private companies and, to the extent that Cellebrite ceases to be a foreign private issuer, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation. If some investors find Ordinary Shares or Warrants less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market and the trading prices of such securities may be more volatile. Cellebrite may take advantage of these reporting exemptions until it is no longer an “emerging growth company.” Cellebrite will remain an “emerging growth company” until the earlier of (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the completion of the IPO, (b) in which it has total annual gross revenue of at least $1.07 billion, or (c) in which it is deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of Ordinary Shares that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last day of the second fiscal quarter of such fiscal year, and (2) the date on which it has issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period.

Risks Related to Ownership of the Ordinary Shares

Our share price has been and will likely continue to be volatile, and you may lose all or part of your investment.

Cellebrite shareholders have sold and may continue to sell their shares in the public market. The sales of significant amounts of our shares, or the perception in the market that this will occur, may decrease the market price of our shares. For more information, see “Risks Relating to an Investment in our Securities — Future resales of the Ordinary Shares issued in connection with the Business Combination may cause the market price of the Ordinary Shares to drop significantly, even if Cellebrite’s business is doing well.”

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Our share price may also be volatile for other reasons, including:

•        announcements by us or our competitors regarding, among other things, strategic changes, new products, product enhancements or technological advances, acquisitions, major transactions, significant litigation or regulatory matters, stock repurchases, or management changes;

•        press or analyst publications, including with respect to changes in recommendations or earnings estimates or growth rates by financial analysts, changes in investors’ or analysts’ valuation measures for our securities, our credit ratings, our security solutions and customers, speculation regarding strategy or mergers and acquisitions (“M&A”), or market trends unrelated to our performance;

•        stock sales by us or our directors, officers, or other significant holders, or stock repurchases by us; and

•        hedging or arbitrage trading activity by third parties.

•        actual or anticipated fluctuations in our results of operations;

•        market conditions in our industry and changes in the estimation of the future growth and size of our markets;

•        real or perceived future dilution risk;

•        the trading volume of our Ordinary Shares; and

•        general economic and market conditions, including with respect to COVID-19.

In addition, the stock markets have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations. Broad market and industry factors may materially harm the market price of our Ordinary Shares, regardless of our operating performance. In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, securities class action litigation has often been instituted against that company. Such lawsuits could result in substantial costs and divert management’s attention and resources, which could adversely affect our business.

The US Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) may not agree that Cellebrite should be treated as a non-U.S. corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

Although Cellebrite is incorporated and tax resident in Israel, the IRS may assert that it should be treated as a U.S. corporation (and therefore a U.S. tax resident) for U.S. federal income tax purposes pursuant to Section 7874 (“Section 7874”) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”). For U.S. federal income tax purposes, a corporation is generally considered a U.S. ”domestic” corporation (or U.S. tax resident) if it is organized in the United States, and a corporation is generally considered a “foreign” corporation (or non-U.S. tax resident) if it is not a U.S. corporation. Because Cellebrite is an entity incorporated and tax resident in Israel, it would generally be classified as a foreign corporation (or non-U.S. tax resident) under these rules. Section 7874 provides an exception under which a foreign incorporated and foreign tax resident entity may, in certain circumstances, be treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

As more fully described in the section titled “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations — U.S. Federal Income Tax Treatment of Cellebrite — Tax Residence of Cellebrite for U.S. Federal Income Tax Purposes”, based on the terms of the Merger and the rules for determining share ownership under Section 7874 and the Section 7874 Regulations, Cellebrite is not intended to be treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Section 7874 after the Merger. However, the application of Section 7874 is complex, is subject to detailed regulations (the application of which is uncertain in various respects, could be impacted by changes in such U.S. Treasury regulations with possible retroactive effect), and is subject to certain factual uncertainties. Accordingly, potential application of Section 7874 is inherently uncertain and there can be no assurance that the IRS will not challenge the status of Cellebrite as a foreign corporation under Section 7874 or that such challenge would not be sustained by a court.

If the IRS were to successfully challenge Cellebrite’s status as a foreign corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Section 7874, Cellebrite and certain Cellebrite shareholders would be subject to significant adverse tax consequences, including a higher effective corporate income tax rate on Cellebrite and future withholding taxes

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on certain Cellebrite shareholders, depending on the application of any income tax treaty that might apply to reduce such withholding taxes. In particular, holders of Ordinary Shares and Warrants would be treated as holders of stock and warrants of a U.S. corporation.

See “Certain Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations  U.S. Federal Income Tax Treatment of Cellebrite  Tax Residence of Cellebrite for U.S. Federal Income Tax Purposes” for a more detailed discussion of the application of Section 7874 to the Merger. Investors in Cellebrite should consult their own advisors regarding the application of Section 7874 to the Merger.

Section 7874 may limit the ability of TWC to use certain tax attributes, increase Cellebrite’s U.S. affiliates’ U.S. taxable income or have other adverse consequences to Cellebrite and Cellebrite’s shareholders.

Following the acquisition of a U.S. corporation by a foreign corporation, Section 7874 can limit the ability of the acquired U.S. corporation and its U.S. affiliates to use U.S. tax attributes (including net operating losses and certain tax credits) to offset U.S. taxable income resulting from certain transactions, as well as result in certain other adverse tax consequences, even if the acquiring foreign corporation is respected as a foreign corporation for purposes of Section 7874. In general, if a foreign corporation acquires, directly or indirectly, substantially all of the properties held directly or indirectly by a U.S. corporation and after the acquisition, the former shareholders of the acquired U.S. corporation hold at least 60% (by either vote or value) but less than 60% (by vote and value) of the shares of the foreign acquiring corporation by reason of holding shares in the acquired U.S. corporation, subject to other requirements, certain adverse tax consequences under Section 7874 may apply.

If these rules apply to the Merger, Cellebrite and certain of Cellebrite’s shareholders may be subject to adverse tax consequences including, but not limited to, restrictions on the use of tax attributes with respect to “inversion gain” recognized over a 10-year period following the transaction, disqualification of dividends paid from preferential “qualified dividend income” rates and the requirement that any U.S. corporation owned by Cellebrite include as “base erosion payments” that may be subject to a minimum U.S. federal income tax any amounts treated as reductions in gross income paid to certain related foreign persons. Furthermore, certain “disqualified individuals” (including officers and directors of a U.S. corporation) may be subject to an excise tax on certain stock-based compensation held thereby at a rate of 20%.

As more fully described in the section titled “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations — U.S. Federal Income Tax Treatment of Cellebrite — Utilization of TWC’s Tax Attributes and Certain Other Adverse Tax Consequences to Cellebrite and Cellebrite’s Shareholders,” based on the terms of the Merger and the rules for determining share ownership under Section 7874 and the Section 7874 Regulations, Cellebrite is not intended to be subject to these rules under Section 7874 after the Merger. The above determination, however, is subject to detailed regulations (the application of which is uncertain in various respects and could be impacted by future changes in such U.S. Treasury regulations, with possible retroactive effect) and is subject to certain factual uncertainties. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that the IRS will not challenge whether Cellebrite is subject to the above rules or that such a challenge would not be sustained by a court.

However, even if Cellebrite is not subject to the above adverse consequences under Section 7874, Cellebrite may be limited in using its equity to engage in future acquisitions of U.S. corporations over a 36-month period following the Merger. If Cellebrite were to be treated as acquiring substantially all of the assets of a U.S. corporation within a 36-month period after the Merger, the Section 7874 Regulations (as defined in “Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations — U.S. Federal Income Tax Treatment of Cellebrite — Tax Residence of Cellebrite for U.S. Federal Income Tax Purposes”) would exclude certain shares of Cellebrite attributable to the Merger for purposes of determining the Section 7874 Percentage of that subsequent acquisition, making it more likely that Section 7874 will apply to such subsequent acquisition.

See “Certain Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations  U.S. Federal Income Tax Treatment of Cellebrite  Tax Residence of Cellebrite for U.S. Federal Income Tax Purposes” for a more detailed discussion of the application of Section 7874 to the Merger. Investors in Cellebrite should consult their own advisors regarding the application of Section 7874 to the Merger.

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Risks Related to the Israeli Tax Treatment of Cellebrite and the Merger

If we do not qualify for Israeli tax benefits, our effective tax rate on our business income and the Israeli withholding tax on distributions of dividends by us to our shareholders may be higher than expected.

Cellebrite believes that it is currently entitled to claim certain tax benefits in Israel, including reduced corporate tax rates, reduced withholding tax rates with respect to dividend distributions and higher depreciation rates. These tax benefits require us to satisfy each tax year certain conditions that included in the provisions of Israeli tax laws. There can be no assurances that we will qualify for such tax benefits in any given year. If we do not qualify for such tax benefits, the effective Israeli tax rate on our business income and the withholding tax rate with respect to dividend that we will distribute to our shareholders may be higher than we expect.

We may be subject to deferred Israeli corporate tax liability with respect to certain payments out of income that was previously exempt from Israeli corporate tax.

We have previously generated income from Approved Enterprise and Beneficiary Enterprise that were exempt from Israeli corporate tax. If we pay dividends out of previously-exempt income we will be subject to deferred Israeli corporate tax upon payment. In addition, payments pursuant to certain transactions in which we may participate may be considered a deemed distribution for this purpose, including certain payments made, whether directly or indirectly, to certain related parties or controlling shareholders (including entities controlled by such controlling shareholders), payments in liquidation and consideration paid to our shareholders in a buyback of shares.

On November 15, 2021 the Investment Law was amended to provide, on a temporary basis, a reduced corporate income tax on the distribution or release within a year from such amendment of tax-exempt profits derived by Approved and Benefited Enterprises (“Exempt Profits”). The amount of the reduced tax will be determined based on a formula. In order to qualify for the reduction, Cellebrite must invest certain amounts in productive assets and research and development in Israel. In parallel to the temporary amendment, the law was also amended to reduce the ability of companies to retain the tax-exempt profits. Effective August 15, 2021, dividend distributions will be treated as if made on a pro-rata basis from all types of earnings, including Exempt Profits

We may be required to pay Israeli taxes, including by way of withholding from our shareholders, as a result of the transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement, and if we do not receive the Transaction Tax Ruling exempting the Indemnified TWC Parties from certain taxes we may be required to indemnify the Indemnified TWC Parties for such Israeli withholding tax liability.

Pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement we have filed an application to receive the Transaction Tax Ruling (which was bifurcated to three separate applications) from the Israel Tax Authority, which seeks to determine (i) that none of the Indemnified TWC Parties are subject to Israeli tax with respect to receipt of Ordinary Shares and/or Warrants, (ii) the tax treatment of the issuance of the Price Adjustment Shares and the Additional Dividend for Israeli Tax purposes and (iii) that the Capital Restructuring is not subject to Israeli withholding Tax. We received a signed ruling regarding the Capital Restructuring and the distribution of funds from the trust account to the Company and an interim ruling regarding the Additional Dividend

We may be required to pay Israeli taxes, including by way of withholding, regardless of whether the Transaction Tax Ruling (which was bifurcated to three separate applications) is obtained or not. We made an irrevocable written undertaking to fully indemnify and hold harmless (on a grossed up basis, to account for their related tax liability and for their Cellebrite holdings) the Indemnified TWC Parties from any Israeli tax actually incurred by such Indemnified TWC Parties which should have been exempted by the Transaction Tax Ruling and from any Israeli tax actually incurred by Cellebrite as a result of the Additional Dividend and Price Adjustment Shares (including from all costs and expenses, including reasonable attorney costs, associated with such tax, including in defending such matters), if the Transaction Tax Ruling shall not be obtained in a form and substance reasonably satisfactory to TWC. Discussions with the ITA around the other points are still pending, and as of the date of this prospectus on Form 20-F, there can be no certainty that a ruling will be obtained, and if obtained what will its terms be. If the Transaction Tax Ruling is not obtained, or if the terms of the Transaction Tax Ruling are not favorable to Cellebrite, our business results may be adversely affected.

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General Risk Factors

Joint ventures, partnerships, and strategic alliances may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and prospects.

We expect to continue to enter into joint ventures, partnerships, and strategic alliances as part of our long-term business strategy. Joint ventures, partnerships, strategic alliances, and other similar arrangements involve significant investments of both time and resources, and there can be no assurances that they will be successful. They may present significant challenges and risks, including that they may not advance our business strategy, we may get an unsatisfactory return on our investment or lose some or all of our investment, they may distract management and divert resources from our core business, they may expose us to unexpected liabilities, or we may choose a partner that does not cooperate as we expect them to and that fails to meet its obligations or that has economic, business, or legal interests or goals that are inconsistent with ours. For example, we partner with various resellers who coordinate the provision of our solutions to the end customer. We believe this arrangement can offer strategic advantages, but it does increase our dependence on third parties to achieve our objectives.

Entry into certain joint ventures, partnerships, or strategic alliances now or in the future may be subject to government regulation, including review by U.S. or foreign government entities related to foreign direct investment. If a joint venture or similar arrangement were subject to regulatory review, such regulatory review might limit our ability to enter into the desired strategic alliance and thus our ability to carry out our long-term business strategy.

As our joint ventures, partnerships, and strategic alliances come to an end or terminate, we may be unable to renew or replace them on comparable terms, or at all. Each of our agreements with resellers have terms of just one year, and so these agreements are frequently up for renewal or termination. When we enter into joint ventures, partnerships, and strategic alliances, our partners may be required to undertake some portion of sales, marketing, implementation solutions, engineering solutions, or software configuration that we would otherwise provide. In such cases, our partner may be less successful than we would have otherwise been absent the arrangement. In the event we enter into an arrangement with a particular partner, we may be less likely (or unable) to work with one or more direct competitors of our partner with which we would have worked absent the arrangement. We may have interests that are different from our joint venture partners and/or which may affect our ability to successfully collaborate with a given partner. Similarly, one or more of our partners in a joint venture, platform partnership, or strategic alliance may independently suffer a bankruptcy or other economic hardship that negatively affects its ability to continue as a going concern or successfully perform on its obligation under the arrangement. In addition, customer satisfaction with our solutions provided in connection with these arrangements may be less favorable than anticipated, negatively impacting anticipated revenue growth and results of operations of arrangements in question. Further, some of our strategic partners offer competing solutions or work with our competitors. As a result of these and other factors, many of the companies with which we have joint ventures, partnerships, or strategic alliances may choose to pursue alternative technologies and develop alternative solutions in addition to or in lieu of our platform, either on their own or in collaboration with others, including our competitors. If we are unsuccessful in establishing or maintaining our relationships with these partners, our ability to compete in a given marketplace or to grow our revenue would be impaired, and our results of operations may suffer. Even if we are successful in establishing and maintaining these relationships with our partners, we cannot assure you that these relationships will result in increased customer usage of our platform or increased revenue.

Further, winding down joint ventures, partnerships, or other strategic alliances can result in additional costs, litigation, and negative publicity. Any of these events could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and growth prospects.

We may acquire or invest in companies and technologies, which may divert our management’s attention, and result in additional dilution to our shareholders. We may be unable to integrate acquired businesses and technologies successfully or achieve the expected benefits of such acquisitions or investments.

As part of our business strategy, we have engaged in strategic transactions in the past and expect to evaluate and consider potential strategic transactions, including acquisitions of, or investments in, businesses, technologies, products, services and other assets in the future. For further information, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis

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of Financial Condition and Results of Operations  Overview  Acquisitions”. While this acquisition has thus far gone smoothly, this acquisition or any future acquisition, investment or business relationship may result in unforeseen risks, operating difficulties and expenditures, including the following:

•        An acquisition may negatively affect our financial results because it may require us to incur charges or assume substantial debt or other liabilities, may cause adverse tax consequences or unfavorable accounting treatment, may expose us to claims and disputes by third parties, including intellectual property claims and disputes, or may not generate sufficient financial return to offset additional costs and expenses related to the acquisition;

•        Potential goodwill impairment charges related to acquisitions;

•        Costs and potential difficulties associated with the requirement to test and assimilate the internal control processes of the acquired business;

•        We may encounter difficulties or unforeseen expenditures assimilating or integrating the businesses, technologies, infrastructure, solutions, personnel, or operations of the acquired companies, particularly if the key personnel of the acquired company choose not to work for us or if we are unable to retain key personnel, if their technology is not easily adapted to work with ours, or if we have difficulty retaining the customers of any acquired business due to changes in ownership, management, or otherwise;

•        We may not realize the expected benefits of the acquisition;

•        An acquisition may disrupt our ongoing business, divert resources, increase our expenses, and distract our management;

•        An acquisition may result in a delay or reduction of customer purchases for both us and the company acquired due to customer uncertainty about continuity and effectiveness of service from either company;

•        The potential impact on relationships with existing customers, vendors, and distributors as business partners as a result of acquiring another company or business that competes with or otherwise is incompatible with those existing relationships;

•        The potential that our due diligence of the acquired company or business does not identify significant problems or liabilities, or that we underestimate the costs and effects of identified liabilities;

•        Exposure to litigation or other claims in connection with, or inheritance of claims or litigation risk as a result of, an acquisition, including but not limited to claims from former employees, customers, or other third parties, which may differ from or be more significant than the risks our business faces;

•        We may encounter difficulties in, or may be unable to, successfully sell any acquired solutions;

•        An acquisition may involve the entry into geographic or business markets in which we have little or no prior experience or where competitors have stronger market positions;

•        An acquisition may require us to comply with additional laws and regulations, or to engage in substantial remediation efforts to cause the acquired company to comply with applicable laws or regulations, or result in liabilities resulting from the acquired company’s failure to comply with applicable laws or regulations;

•        Our use of cash to pay for an acquisition would limit other potential uses for our cash;

•        If we incur debt to fund such acquisition, such debt may subject us to material restrictions on our ability to conduct our business as well as financial maintenance covenants; and

•        To the extent that we issue a significant amount of equity securities in connection with future acquisitions, existing shareholders may be diluted and earnings per share may decrease.

The occurrence of any of these risks could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition. Moreover, we cannot assure you that we would not be exposed to unknown liabilities.

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Our international operations expose us to business, political and economic risks that could cause our operating results to suffer.

We intend to continue to make efforts to increase our international operations and anticipate that international sales will continue to account for a significant portion of our revenue. These international operations are subject to certain risks and costs, including the difficulty and expense of administering business and compliance abroad, differences in business practices, compliance with domestic and foreign laws (including without limitation domestic and international import and export laws and regulations and the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”), including potential violations by acts of agents or other intermediaries), costs related to localizing solutions for foreign markets, costs related to translating and distributing software solutions in a timely manner, costs related to increased financial accounting and reporting burdens and complexities, longer sales and collection cycles for accounts receivables, failure of laws or courts to protect our intellectual property rights adequately, local competition, and economic or political instability and uncertainties, including inflation, recession, interest rate fluctuations and actual or anticipated military or geopolitical conflicts. In addition, regulatory limitations regarding the repatriation of earnings may adversely affect the transfer of cash earned from foreign operations.

Significant international sales may also expose us to greater risk from political and economic instability, unexpected changes in Israeli, U.S. or other governmental policies concerning import and export of goods and technology, regulatory requirements, tariffs and other trade barriers. Economic downturns and geopolitical challenges in the Americas, EMEA or certain other parts of the world critical to our operations could cause our customers in those locations to reevaluate decisions to purchase our solutions or to delay or reduce their technology purchasing decisions, which could adversely impact our results of operations. For instance, rising tensions between Russia and Ukraine, recently resulting in Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and the possibility of retaliatory measures taken by the U.S. and NATO have created global security concerns that could have a lasting adverse impact on regional and global economies, and in turn, on our customers’ decision to purchase our products. We have proactively stopped selling to Russia and approximately 0.35% of our 2021 revenues were from Ukraine.

Additionally, international earnings may be subject to taxation by more than one jurisdiction, which may materially adversely affect our effective tax rate. Finally, international expansion may be difficult, time consuming, and costly. These risks and their potential impacts may be exacerbated by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. See “— Risks Related to Cellebrite’s Business and Industry — The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic could negatively impact our business, installations, trainings, and general operations.” As a result, if revenue from international operations do not offset the expenses of establishing and maintaining foreign operations, our business, operating results and financial condition will suffer.

If our goodwill or intangible assets become impaired, we may be required to record a significant charge to earnings.

We have acquired and may acquire other companies and intangible assets, and we may not realize all the economic benefit from those acquisitions, which could cause an impairment of goodwill or intangibles. We review our amortizable intangible assets for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable. We test goodwill for impairment at least annually. If such goodwill is deemed to be impaired, an impairment loss equal to the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the fair value of the assets would be recognized. Events which might indicate impairment include, but are not limited to, declines in stock price market capitalization or cash flows, adverse cost factors, deteriorating financial performance, strategic decisions made in response to economic, market and competitive conditions, the impact of the economic environment on us and our customer base, and/or relevant events such as changes in management, key personnel, litigation or customers.

We may be required to record a significant charge in our financial statements during the period in which any impairment of our goodwill or intangible assets is determined, which would negatively affect our results of operations.

Our provision for income taxes and effective income tax rate may vary significantly and may adversely affect our results of operations and cash resources.

Significant judgment is required in determining our provision for income taxes. Various internal and external factors may have favorable or unfavorable effects on our future provision for income taxes, income taxes receivable, and our effective income tax rate. These factors include, but are not limited to, changes in tax laws, regulations and/or rates, results of audits by tax authorities, changing interpretations of existing tax laws or regulations, changes in estimates of prior years’ items, the impact of transactions we complete, future levels of research and development

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spending, changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities, transfer pricing adjustments, changes in the overall mix of income among the different jurisdictions in which we operate, and changes in overall levels of income before taxes. Furthermore, new accounting pronouncements or new interpretations of existing accounting pronouncements, and/or any internal restructuring initiatives we may implement from time to time to streamline our operations, can have a material impact on our effective income tax rate.

Tax examinations are often complex as tax authorities may disagree with the treatment of items reported by us and our transfer pricing methodology based upon our limited risk distributor model, the result of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Although we believe our estimates are reasonable, the ultimate outcome with respect to the taxes we owe may differ from the amounts recorded in our financial statements, and this difference may materially affect our financial position and financial results in the period or periods for which such determination is made.

We are subject to anti-corruption, anti-bribery, and similar laws, and non-compliance with such laws can subject us to criminal penalties or significant fines, harm and reputation, and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and growth prospects.

We are or will be subject to anti-corruption, anti-bribery, anti-money laundering and financial and economic sanctions laws and regulations in various jurisdictions in which we conduct or in the future may conduct activities, including the FCPA, the U.K. Bribery Act 2010, and other anti-corruption laws and regulations. The FCPA and the U.K. Bribery Act 2010 prohibit us and our officers, directors, employees and business partners acting on our behalf, including agents, from corruptly offering, promising, authorizing or providing anything of value to a “foreign official” for the purposes of influencing official decisions or obtaining or retaining business or otherwise obtaining favorable treatment. The FCPA also requires companies to make and keep books, records and accounts that accurately reflect transactions and dispositions of assets and to maintain a system of adequate internal accounting controls. The U.K. Bribery Act also prohibits non-governmental “commercial” bribery and soliciting or accepting bribes. A violation of these laws or regulations could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and reputation.

Non-compliance with anti-corruption, anti-bribery, anti-money laundering or financial and economic sanctions laws could subject us to whistleblower complaints, adverse media coverage, investigations, and severe administrative, civil and criminal sanctions, collateral consequences, remedial measures and legal expenses, all of which could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and reputation. In addition, changes in economic sanctions laws in the future could adversely impact our business and an investment in our securities.

Our pricing structures for our solutions may change from time to time.

We offer our solutions at a higher price point than many of our competitors, and this may change in the future. We expect that we may change our pricing model from time to time, including as a result of competition, global economic conditions, general reductions in our customers’ spending levels, pricing studies, or changes in how our solutions are broadly consumed. Similarly, as we introduce new, or as a result of the evolution of our existing solutions, we may have difficulty determining the appropriate price structure for our solutions. In addition, as new and existing competitors introduce new solutions that compete with ours, or revise their pricing structures, we may be unable to attract new customers at the same price or based on the same pricing model as we have used historically. Moreover, as we continue to target selling our solutions to larger organizations, these larger organizations may demand substantial price concessions. In addition, we may need to change pricing policies to accommodate government pricing guidelines for our contracts with federal, state, local, and foreign governments and government agencies. If we are unable to modify or develop pricing models and strategies that are attractive to existing and prospective customers, while enabling us to significantly grow our sales and revenue relative to our associated costs and expenses in a reasonable period of time, our business, financial condition, and results of operations may be adversely impacted.

If we fail to maintain an effective system of internal controls, our ability to produce timely and accurate financial statements or comply with applicable regulations could be impaired.

As a public company, we are subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and the rules and regulations of the listing standards of Nasdaq. We expect that the requirements of these rules

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and regulations will continue to increase our legal, accounting, and financial compliance costs, make some activities more difficult, time-consuming, and costly, and place significant strain on our personnel, systems, and resources. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires, among other things, that we maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. We are continuing to develop and refine our disclosure controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we will file with the SEC is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in SEC rules and forms and that information required to be disclosed in reports under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our principal executive and financial officers. We may also need to improve our internal control over financial reporting. Some members of our management team have limited or no experience managing a publicly traded company, interacting with public company investors, and complying with the increasingly complex laws pertaining to public companies, and we have limited accounting and financial reporting personnel and other resources with which to address our internal controls and related procedures, including complying with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act that we will eventually be required to include in our annual reports filed with the SEC. We may need to hire and successfully integrate additional accounting and financial staff with appropriate company experience and technical accounting knowledge. In order to maintain and improve the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting, we have expended, and anticipate that we will continue to expend, significant resources, including accounting-related costs and significant management oversight.

Our current controls and any new controls that we develop may become inadequate because of changes in conditions in our business. Further, we may identify in the future deficiencies in our controls. Any failure to develop or maintain effective controls or any difficulties encountered in their implementation or improvement could harm our results of operations or cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations and may result in a restatement of our financial statements for prior periods. Any failure to implement and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting also could adversely affect the results of periodic management evaluations and annual independent registered public accounting firm attestation reports. Ineffective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting could also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial and other information, which could have a negative effect on the trading price of our securities. In addition, if we are unable to continue to meet these requirements, we may not be able to remain listed on The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC. We are not currently required to comply with the SEC rules that implement Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and are therefore not required to make a formal assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting for that purpose. As a public company, we are required to provide an annual management report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting commencing with our second annual report on Form 20-F.

Our independent registered public accounting firm is not required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting until after we are no longer an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS Act. At such time, our independent registered public accounting firm may issue a report that is adverse in the event it is not satisfied with the level at which our internal control over financial reporting is documented, designed, or operating. Any failure to maintain effective disclosure controls and internal control over financial reporting could have a material and adverse effect on our business and results of operations and could cause a decline in the price of our securities.

If our estimates or judgments relating to our critical accounting policies prove to be incorrect, our results of operations could be adversely affected.

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes appearing elsewhere in this prospectus. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances, as discussed in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations  Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates.” The results of these estimates form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets, liabilities, and equity, and the amount of revenue and expenses. Significant estimates and judgments involve: revenue recognition; contract acquisition costs; valuation of our Ordinary Shares, Price Adjustment Shares and share-based compensation; fair values of assets acquired and liabilities assumed in connection with the Merger; and income taxes. Our results of operations may be adversely affected if our assumptions change or if actual circumstances differ from those in our assumptions, which could cause our results of operations to fall below the expectations of securities analysts and investors, resulting in a decline in the market price of our securities.

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USE OF PROCEEDS

All of the Ordinary Shares offered by the Selling Securityholders pursuant to this prospectus will be sold by the Selling Securityholders for their respective amounts. We will not receive any of the proceeds from these sales.

We will receive up to an aggregate of approximately $341 million from the exercise of the warrants, assuming the exercise in full of all such warrants for cash. We expect to use the net proceeds from the exercise of the warrants for general corporate purposes, which may include acquisitions and other business opportunities and the repayment of indebtedness. Our management will have broad discretion over the use of proceeds from the exercise of the warrants.

There is no assurance that the holders of the warrants will elect to exercise any or all of the warrants. To the extent that the warrants are exercised on a “cashless basis,” the amount of cash we would receive from the exercise of the warrants will decrease.

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MARKET PRICE OF OUR SECURITIES

Our Ordinary Shares began trading on The Nasdaq Global Market (“Nasdaq”) under the symbols “CLBT” August 30, 2021. On March 28, 2022, the closing sale prices of our Ordinary Shares were $6.31, and the last reported sales price of our Warrants was $1.15 per warrant. Based on a review of the information provided to us by our transfer agent, as of December 31, 2021, there were 28 registered holders of our shares in the United States, including Cede & Co., the nominee of the Depository Trust Company), together holding approximately 11% of our outstanding Ordinary Shares. The number of record holders in the United States is not representative of the number of beneficial holders, nor is it representative of where such beneficial holders are resident, since many of these ordinary shares were held by brokers or other nominees.

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with the section titled “Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Information” and our consolidated financial statements and related notes appearing elsewhere in this prospectus. The following discussion and analysis contain forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. When reviewing the discussion below, you should keep in mind the substantial risks and uncertainties that could impact our business. In particular, we encourage you to review the risks and uncertainties described in the section titled “Risk Factors” included elsewhere in this prospectus. These risks and uncertainties could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in forward-looking statements contained in this prospectus or implied by past results and trends. our fiscal year ends on December 31. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for any period in the future, and our interim results are not necessarily indicative of the results we expect for the full fiscal year or any other period.

Overview

We are the leading provider of digital intelligence (“DI”), delivering a platform of software and services for legally sanctioned investigations. Our mission is to protect and save lives, accelerate justice and preserve privacy in global communities. Our DI platform allows users to collect, review, analyze, and manage digital data across the investigative lifecycle. Our platform of investigation solutions extracts digital data, delivers the data as digital evidence, and makes the evidence actionable. As of the date of this prospectus, our solutions were utilized in millions of investigations globally. Our solutions are used in a variety of cases including child exploitation, homicide, anti-terror, border control, sexual crimes, human trafficking, corporate security, and civil litigation.

Law enforcement investigative units are often using inefficient processes and manual workflows to prosecute investigations. Large amounts of data are collected and processed with limited technology and ineffective home-grown solutions, contributing to a lack of collaboration between departments, three-month average investigation backlogs and less than 50% clearance rates. Our technology enables faster data collection, fusing and enriching of data for smarter analysis, and brings the ability to collaborate efficiently across various investigation functions in real-time.

We deploy our DI platform through a subscription which is recognized ratably over the subscription term with a portion of revenue, related to the term-based license portion, recognized upfront; perpetual license, which is recognized upfront; hardware, which represents sale of accessories, proprietary and third-party devices on which our software is installed; and services, which are recognized over the term of the service and in certain cases upon the fulfillment of the performance obligation. Historically we generated a majority of our revenue from perpetual license agreements and their related subscription, however, we have extended our business model to offer subscription licenses. As a result, we expect the decrease of the sale of perpetual licenses to continue.

Our software revenue is derived from solutions we offer across the investigative lifecycle including our Collect & Review, analyze and manage digital data. Much of our growth is derived from our land-and-expand strategy within our deeply entrenched customer base. Our services revenue is derived from Training Academy delivering best-in-class training and certification to thousands of investigation practitioners every year, Advanced Services, providing customers with a lawful device advanced access services and other professional services. We utilize both a direct sales force and resellers to reach our customers, which include approximately 5,000 federal, state and local government agencies and approximately 1,700 enterprise companies and service providers as of December 31, 2021.

Our DI software platform allows users to Collect & Review, analyze and manage digital data sources across the investigative lifecycle. In Collect & Review solutions, Cellebrite UFED has become the standard in investigations. UFED enables collecting, decoding and preserving data from over 31,000 different digital data profiles. It is the tool of choice for over 42,000 individuals in over 140 countries. In Analyze solutions, Cellebrite’s Pathfinder helps investigators reach conclusions faster through automated data ingestion, normalization, consolidation, and visualization of a suspects’ journey across their complete digital signature. Pathfinder eliminates time-consuming and manual review of digital data. It is a force multiplier that uses AI and machine learning (“ML”) algorithms to automatically surface formative leads and actionable insights. In Manage solutions, Cellebrite Commander enables collaboration across investigation functions to reduce manual processes. It manages all deployed licenses, permission & access control, provides standard operating procedures (“SOP”) enforcement, as well as software version control and case dashboards.

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In the private sector, our solutions help enterprises customers and service providers protect data and information for purposes of internal investigations, eDiscovery and litigation support, compliance and corporate security. Sample use cases include IP theft, employee misconduct and investigation of internal data security incidents.

Our revenue was $246.2 million and $194.9 million for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, representing a period-over-period increase of 26%. The increase in revenue period over period was driven by the followings: (i) strong continued sales to existing customer base; and (ii) adoption of our leading Collect & Review offering in a term license model.

Net income of $71.4 million and $5.8 million was incurred for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, representing a period-over-period increase of $65.5 million. This growth primarily reflects the continued growth of our revenue and relatively smaller increase in operating expenses and the impact of the financial income from presenting the Company’s Warrants, Restricted Sponsor shares liability and Price adjustment shares liability at their fair value. Our growth is expected to be supported by our continued investment in scaling up our business. Our Adjusted EBITDA for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020 were $47.9 million and $31.1 million, respectively.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Impact

On January 30, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 outbreak a “Public Health Emergency of International Concern” and on March 11, 2020, declared it to be a pandemic. Actions taken around the world to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19 include restrictions on travel, quarantines in certain areas and forced closures for certain types of public places and businesses. COVID-19 and actions taken to mitigate its spread have had and are expected to continue to have an adverse impact on the economies and financial markets of many countries. In December 2020, the United States declared a State of National Emergency due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Many business establishments have closed due to restrictions imposed by the government and many governmental authorities have closed most public establishments. Cellebrite business continues to operate despite the disruption of some business operations.

In mid-March 2020 we moved our operations from our offices to a remote model, allowing employees to work from their homes. Although the various offices were open for work within the limitation of the local laws, most of the year, most of the employees worked remotely. We were well prepared to implement a remote working schedule and implemented on-going training to managers and employees to improve their working routines and deliverables. Our logistics continued operating with no substantial impact on deliveries to customers.

Due to COVID-19, most of the communication with customers has been done remotely. Yet, by leveraging our global presence, we have continued our sales activities in our main markets with the local sales teams, subject only to the local restrictions and not to global travel limitations. Marketing activities were shifted from on-site events to virtual activities. The only offering which was substantially negatively impacted was the instructor-led training classes, as customers were slow to adopt to the remote learning offering. As of May 2021 we see a gradual return to in person activities.

Acquisitions

On November 11, 2021, we completed the acquisition of a substantial part of the assets, business and activities of Digital Clues AG (“Digital Clues” or “DC”), an open-source intelligence firm for a total consideration of $20 million. The acquisition is expected to aid in growing the company’s footprint within law enforcement intelligence and investigation units across the globe. Digital Clues’ open-source intelligence solutions kickstart law enforcement intelligence and investigation efforts when there are no targets and very few clues, helping customers collect and connect data from open sources.

On February 28, 2020, we completed the acquisition of 100% of the shares of BlackBag Technologies Inc., a U.S. computer forensic solutions company, for a total amount of $33.4 million. The acquisition expands our portfolio of DI solutions and upgrades our strategic commitment to provide customers a “one-stop-shop” offering that is capable of meeting their most important digital investigation needs.

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Investments

On June 17, 2019, IGP Saferworld Limited Partnership (“IGP”), an investment vehicle of IGP Capital, a venture capital firm based in Israel, invested $110 million in exchange for Cellebrite Preferred Shares, representing 24.4% of Cellebrite’s outstanding ordinary and Preferred Shares at the time of the investment. Following the transaction, IGP appointed two directors to our board of directors. The investment agreement also defines certain exit events that IGP can enforce on the shareholders. At the Closing, IGP’s Cellebrite Preferred Shares were converted into Ordinary Shares. At the Closing, IGP also waived its right to receive payment of the accrued preferred dividend and the right to appoint a total of two directors to our board of directors. Following the Closing, IGP appointed one director to our board of directors.

Business combination

On April 8, 2021, TWC, Cellebrite and Merger Sub entered into the Business Combination Agreement providing for, upon the terms and subject to the conditions thereof, a business combination between TWC and Cellebrite pursuant to which, among other things, Merger Sub merged with and into TWC at the Effective Time (as defined in the Business Combination Agreement), with TWC continuing as the surviving entity and as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Cellebrite. The Merger closed on August 30, 2021. The Merger was accounted for as a recapitalization, with no goodwill or other intangible assets recorded, in accordance with U.S. GAAP. Under this method of accounting, Cellebrite has been determined to be the accounting acquirer. The combined entity is the successor SEC registrant, meaning that Cellebrite’s financial statements for previous periods will be disclosed in the registrant’s future periodic reports filed with the SEC.

As a consequence of the Merger, the Ordinary Shares are registered under the Exchange Act and listed on Nasdaq, and we were required to hire additional personnel and implement procedures and processes to address public company regulatory requirements and customary practices. We have incurred, and expect to incur additional annual expenses as a public company for, among other things, directors’ and officers’ liability and Board of Directors related expenses.

Key Factors Affecting Our Performance

Our historical financial performance has been, and we expect our financial performance in the future to be, driven by our ability to:

•        Increase penetration within existing customers.    We plan to continue to increase penetration within our existing customers with our complete DI platform of software and services and by expanding the breadth of our platform capabilities to provide for continued up-sell and cross-selling opportunities across the DI platform and to new buying centers. We have seen significant ARR dollar-based net retention due to the broad use cases of our platform.

•        Extend our technology and market leadership position.    We intend to strengthen our position as a market-leading DI platform through investment in research and development and continued innovation. We expect to focus on expanding the functionality of our DI platform and investing in capabilities that cater customer needs and mode of operation. Also, we are increasing our investment in SaaS and Cloud to address growing demand to consume DI solutions via these vehicles. Additionally, we plan to promote our offerings to address more private sector use cases. We believe this strategy expands our addressable market, enables new growth opportunities and allows us to continue to deliver differentiated high-value outcomes to our customers.

•        Grow our customer base.    We intend to drive new customer growth in both the public sector prime accounts as well as in the private sector by focusing on enterprise accounts and introducing offerings to address customers’ needs (for example, our additional remote collection offering). We are targeting specific use cases among enterprises. For example: infringement of patents is a major concern for pharmaceuticals companies, resolution of data corporate security incidents is a major concern for banks, and IP theft to establish similar solutions is a concern for retailers. We plan to tailor our solutions to meet more use cases in enterprise and drive customer growth.

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Key Metrics

In addition to our U.S. GAAP financial information, we monitor the following key metrics and non-GAAP financial measure in order to help us measure and evaluate the effectiveness of our operations:

 

Year Ended
December 31,

   

2021

 

2020

Annual recurring revenue (ARR)

 

$

187

 

 

$

137

 

Growth

 

 

36

%

 

 

49

%

Recurring revenue dollar-based net retention rate

 

 

137

 

 

 

142

 

Adjusted EBITDA

 

$

47.9

 

 

$

31.1

 

Annual recurring revenue:    Annual recurring revenue (“ARR”) is defined as the annualized value of active term-based subscription license contracts and maintenance contracts related to perpetual licenses in effect at the end of that period. Subscription license contracts and maintenance contracts for perpetual licenses are annualized by multiplying the revenue of the last month of the period by 12.

Recurring revenue dollar-based net retention rate:    dollar-based net retention rate is calculated by dividing customer recurring revenue by base revenue. We define base revenue as recurring revenue we recognized from all customers with a valid license at the last quarter of the previous year period, during the four quarters ended one year prior to the date of measurement. We define our customer revenue as the recurring revenue we recognized during the four quarters ended on the date of measurement from the same customer base included in our measure of base revenue, including recurring revenue resulting from additional sales to those customers.

Adjusted EBITDA:    Adjusted EBITDA is calculated as net income plus financial income, tax expense, depreciation and amortization, one-time expenses, share-based compensation expense, acquisition related costs and capital loss from FA disposal.

The following table provides a reconciliation of our net income to Adjusted EBITDA:

 

Year Ended
December 31,

   

2021

 

2020

Net income

 

$

71,396

 

 

$

5,781

 

Financial income

 

 

(68,483

)

 

 

(2,179

)

Tax expense

 

 

10,909

 

 

 

5,616

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

7,007

 

 

 

5,879

 

Issuance expenses

 

 

11,835

 

 

 

 

One-time expense (2020 salary expense due to a termination of a
co-founder of the Company)

 

 

 

 

 

1,519

 

Dividend participation compensation

 

 

966

 

 

 

 

Share-based compensation expense

 

 

6,480

 

 

 

7,271

 

Acquisition related costs

 

 

7,795

 

 

 

6,542

 

Capital loss from FA disposal (one-time expense due to abandonment of FA as part of an exit of a lease agreement)

 

 

 

 

 

689

 

Adjusted EBITDA

 

 

47,905

 

 

 

31,118

 

Adjusted EBITDA margin – %

 

 

19.5

%

 

 

16

%

In calculating Adjusted EBITDA, we exclude items that either have a non-recurring impact on our income statement or which, in the judgment of our management, are items that, either as a result of their nature or size, could, were they not singled out, potentially cause investors to extrapolate future performance from an improper base. In addition, we also exclude share-based compensation expenses to facilitate a better understanding of our operating performance, since these expenses are non-cash and accordingly, we believe do not affect our business operations.

We use Adjusted EBITDA to evaluate our operational performance and to compare it against our work plan and budget. Adjusted EBITDA has no standardized meaning and accordingly has limitations in its usefulness to investors. We provide such non-GAAP measure because management believes it provides useful information to

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investors. However, investors are cautioned that, unlike financial measures prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP, non-GAAP measures may not be comparable with similar measures used by other companies. These non-GAAP financial measures are presented solely to permit investors to more fully understand how management and our board assesses our performance. The limitations of this non-GAAP financial measure as a performance measure is that it’s provides a view of our results of operations without reflecting all events during a period and may not provide a comparable view of our performance to other companies in our industry. Investors should consider our non-GAAP financial measure in addition to, and not as replacements for, or superior to, measures of financial performance prepared in accordance with GAAP.

Key Components of Results of Operations

Revenue

Revenue consists of subscription, perpetual license and other, and professional services.

•        Subscription.    Subscription revenue is comprised of subscription services and term-license revenue. The subscription services revenue is the revenue that is recognized over the life of the subscription and the term-license revenue is what is immediately recognized upon the sale of a license. In connection with our term-based license and perpetual license arrangements, we generate revenue through maintenance and support under renewable subscription, fee-based contracts that include unspecified software updates and upgrades released when and if available as well as software patches and support. Customers with active subscriptions are also entitled to our technical customers’ support.

•        Perpetual License and Other.    Perpetual license revenue reflects the revenue recognized from sales of perpetual licenses related to products. Perpetual license fees are recognized upfront assuming all revenue recognition criteria are satisfied. The license is installed on premise, mostly on customers’ computers. Other revenue consists of revenue from usage-based fees and sale of hardware related to our offering.

•        Professional Services.    Professional Services consists of revenue related to: (i) certified training classes by Cellebrite Academy; (ii) our advanced technical services; (iii) implementation of our products in connection with our software licenses. The revenue of professional services is recognized upon the delivery of our services.

Cost of Revenue

Cost of revenue consists of cost of subscription, cost of perpetual license and other, and cost of professional services.

•        Cost of Subscription.    Cost of subscription revenue includes all direct cost to deliver subscription services, including third party license fees, fees paid to OEMs, materials, salaries and related employees’ expenses, allocated overhead for depreciation of equipment and facilities as well as IT and travel expenses. We recognize these costs and expenses upon occurrence.

•        Cost of Perpetual License and Other.    Cost of perpetual license and other revenue includes all direct costs to deliver perpetual license and other products, including third party license fees, fees paid for third party products, materials, salaries and related employees’ expenses, allocated overhead for depreciation of equipment and facilities, IT, travel expenses, warehouse, manufacturing and supply chain costs. We recognize these costs and expenses upon occurrence.

•        Cost of Professional Service.    Cost of professional service revenue includes salaries and related employees’ expenses, subcontractors, travel expenses and all direct costs related to services such as fees paid for third party products, allocated overhead for depreciation of equipment and facilities as well as IT and travel expenses. We recognize these costs and expenses upon occurrence.

Gross Profit and Gross Margin

Gross profit is revenue less cost of revenue, and gross margin is gross profit as a percentage of revenue. Gross profit has been and will continue to be affected by various factors, including our revenue mix, the selling price to

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our customers, the cost of our manufacturing facility, supply chain, salaries, other related costs to our employees and subcontractors and overhead. We expect that our gross margin will fluctuate from period to period depending on the interplay of these various factors.

Operating Expenses

Operating expenses consists of research and development, sales and marketing and general and administrative. The most significant components of our operating expenses are personnel costs, which is included in each component of operating expenses and consists of salaries, benefits, bonuses, stock-based compensation and, with regards to sales and marketing expenses, sales commissions.

•        Research and development.    Research and development expenses primarily consist of the cost of salaries and related costs for employees, subcontractors cost and depreciation of equipment. We focus our research and development efforts on developing new solutions, core technologies and to further enhance the functionality, reliability, performance and flexibility of existing solutions. We believe that our software development teams and our core technologies represent a significant competitive advantage for us and we expect that our research and development expenses will continue to increase, as we invest in research and development headcount to further strengthen and enhance our solutions.

•        General and administrative.    General and administrative expenses primarily consist of personnel and facility-related costs for our executive, finance, legal, IT, human resources and administrative personnel, and other corporate expenses, including those associated with preparation of the public offering. We anticipate continuing to incur additional expenses due to growing our operations and being a public company, including higher legal, corporate insurance and accounting expenses. All of the departments are allocated with general and administrative expenses such as rent and related expenses, recruitment and training, information systems licenses, support and others.

•        Sales and marketing.    Sales and marketing expenses primarily consist of personnel, marketing, and business development personnel, travel expenses, and commissions earned by our sales personnel. Our costs of marketing and business development programs and facility-related costs for our sales also contribute to the sales and marketing expenses. We expect that sales and marketing expenses will continue to increase as we continue to hire additional sales and marketing personnel while investing in sales and marketing programs.

Quarterly Trends in Operating Expenses

Operating expenses have generally increased sequentially as a result of our growth and are primarily relates to increases in personnel-related costs, including share-based compensation, to support the expanded operations, continued investment in research and development, and expansion of commercial and marketing investments.

Financial Income, Net

Financial income, net consists primarily of revaluation of derivative warrant liability, restricted sponsor shares and price adjustment shares, interest income on our short-term deposits, fees to banks and foreign currency realized and unrealized gains and losses related to the impact of transactions denominated in a foreign currency.

Income Tax Expense

Income tax expense (as well as deferred tax assets and liabilities, and liabilities for unrecognized tax benefits) reflect management’s best assessment of estimated current and future taxes to be paid. We are subject to income taxes in Israel, the United States, and numerous other foreign jurisdictions.

Significant judgments and estimates are required in determining the consolidated income tax expense.

Our income tax rate varies from Israel’s statutory income tax rates, mainly due to differing tax rates and regulations in foreign jurisdictions and other differences between expenses and expenses recognized by other tax authorities in relevant jurisdictions. We expect this fluctuation in income tax rates, as well as its potential impact on our results of operations, to continue.

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Results of Operations

The following tables set forth our results of operations for the periods presented:

 

Year ended
December 31,

   

2021

 

2020

Revenue:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subscription services

 

$

120,889

 

 

$

100,614

 

Term-license

 

 

62,428

 

 

 

29,131

 

Total subscription

 

 

183,317

 

 

 

129,745

 

Perpetual license and other

 

 

34,169

 

 

 

42,136

 

Professional services

 

 

28,760

 

 

 

23,032

 

Total Revenue

 

 

246,246

 

 

 

194,913

 

Cost of revenue:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of subscription services

 

 

9,369

 

 

 

8,795

 

Cost of term license

 

 

2,299

 

 

 

1,709

 

Total subscription

 

 

11,668

 

 

 

10,504

 

Cost of perpetual license and other

 

 

9,817

 

 

 

9,370

 

Cost of professional services

 

 

21,072

 

 

 

18,005

 

Total cost of revenue

 

 

42,557

 

 

 

37,879

 

Gross profit

 

 

203,689

 

 

 

157,034

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales and marketing

 

 

76,389

 

 

 

61,305

 

Research and development

 

 

65,541

 

 

 

54,377

 

General and administrative

 

 

47,937

 

 

 

32,134

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

189,867

 

 

 

147,816

 

Operating income

 

 

13,822

 

 

 

9,218

 

Financial income, net

 

 

68,483

 

 

 

2,179

 

Income before income tax expense

 

 

82,305

 

 

 

11,397

 

Income tax expense

 

 

10,909

 

 

 

5,616

 

Net income

 

 

71,396

 

 

 

5,781

 

Other comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized gain (loss) on hedging transactions, net of tax

 

 

(944

)

 

 

1,212

 

Foreign currency translation adjustments

 

 

995

 

 

 

(695

)

Total other comprehensive income, net of tax

 

 

51

 

 

 

517

 

Total comprehensive income

 

$

71,447

 

 

$

6,298

 

Results of operations includes share-based compensation expenses as follows:

 

Year ended
December 31,

   

2021

 

2020

Cost of revenue

 

$

290

 

$

304

Sales and marketing

 

 

2,332

 

 

2,298

Research and development

 

 

1,076

 

 

1,145

General and administrative

 

 

2,782

 

 

3,524

Total share-based compensation

 

$

6,480

 

$

7,271

52

Table of Contents

Comparison of years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020

Revenue

 

Year Ended
December 31,

 

Change

   

2021

 

2020

 

Amount

 

Percent

   

($ in thousands)

Subscription services

 

$

120,889

 

$

100,614

 

$

20,275

 

 

20

%

Term-license

 

 

62,428

 

 

29,131

 

 

33,297

 

 

114

%

Total subscription

 

 

183,317

 

 

129,745

 

 

53,572

 

 

41

%

Perpetual license and other

 

 

34,169

 

 

42,136

 

 

(7,967

)

 

(19

)%

Professional services

 

 

28,760

 

 

23,032

 

 

5,728

 

 

25

%

Total Revenue

 

$

246,246

 

$

194,913

 

$

51,333

 

 

26

%

Subscription

Subscription revenue is comprised of subscription services and term-license revenue. The subscription services revenue is the revenue that is recognized over the life of the subscription and the term-license revenue is what is immediately recognized upon the sale of a license. Subscription revenue increased by $53.6 million, or 41% for the year ended December 31, 2021, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2020, primarily due to an increase attributable to: (i) an increase of $30.1 million related to the adoption of our leading Collect & Review offering in a term-based license model instead of a perpetual license model with usage-based fees; (ii) an increase of $6.9 million related to our new offering of computer Collect & Review solution; and (iii) an increase of $16.6 million related to new bookings from new customers, expansion of our installed base and other licenses for existing customers.

Perpetual License and Other

Perpetual license and other revenue decreased by $8 million, or 19% for the year ended December 31, 2021, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2020, primarily due to the adoption of our leading Collect & Review offering in a term-based license model instead of a perpetual license model with usage-based fees.

Professional Services

Professional services revenue increased by $5.7 million, or 25% for the year ended December 31, 2021, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2020, primarily due to an increase in instructor-led training classes as a result of relief in COVID-19 related social distancing and travel limitation.

Cost of Revenue

 

Year Ended
December 31,

 

Change

   

2021

 

2020

 

Amount

 

Percent