Filed Pursuant to Rule 424(b)(3)

PROSPECTUS

 

Registration No. 333-259826

CELLEBRITE DI LTD.

171,729,210 Ordinary Shares
9,666,667 Warrants to Purchase Ordinary Shares
29,666,667 Ordinary Shares Underlying Warrants

This prospectus relates to the offer and sale from time to time by the selling securityholders named in this prospectus (the “Selling Securityholders”) of (A) 30,000,000 of our Ordinary Shares, par value of NIS 0.00001 per share (“Ordinary Shares”), purchased in a private placement in connection with our Merger (as defined below), (B) up to 13,500,000 Ordinary Shares issued to TWC Tech Holdings II, LLC (the “Sponsor”) and affiliates in connection with the consummation of the Business Combination (as defined below) in exchange for Class A common stock, par value $0.0001 per share (the “TWC Class A Common Stock”) of TWC Tech Holdings II Corp, a Delaware corporation (“TWC”), (C) 128,229,210 Ordinary Shares held by certain holders that were shareholders of record of the Company prior to the consummation of the Business Combination (as defined below) and (D) warrants to purchase up to 9,666,667 Ordinary Shares (the “Warrants”) held by the Sponsor following the consummation of the Business Combination as a result of the exchange of warrants to purchase TWC Class A Common Stock for the Warrants. In addition, this prospectus relates to the issuance by us of up to 20,000,000 Ordinary Shares that are issuable by us upon the exercise of the Public Warrants (as defined below), which were previously registered, and up to 9,666,667 Ordinary Shares underlying Private Warrants (as defined below).

The Selling Securityholders may offer, sell or distribute all or a portion of the securities hereby registered publicly or through private transactions at prevailing market prices or at negotiated prices. We will not receive any of the proceeds from such sales of the Ordinary Shares or warrants, except with respect to amounts received by us upon the exercise of the warrants. We will bear all costs, expenses and fees in connection with the registration of these securities, including with regard to compliance with state securities or “blue sky” laws. The Selling Securityholders will bear all commissions and discounts, if any, attributable to their sale of Ordinary Shares or warrants. See “Plan of Distribution”.

Our Ordinary Shares and Warrants are listed on The Nasdaq Global Market under the symbols “CLBT” and “CLBTW”, respectively. On September 12, 2022, the last reported sales price of our Ordinary Shares was $4.600 per share and the last reported sales price of our warrants was $0.736 per warrant.

We are a “foreign private issuer,” and an “emerging growth company” each as defined under the federal securities laws, and, as such, we are subject to reduced public company reporting requirements. See the section entitled “Prospectus Summary — Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company and a Foreign Private Issuer” for additional information.

Investing in our securities involves a high degree of risk. You should review carefully the risks and uncertainties described under the heading “Risk Factors” in our then-most recent Annual Report on Form 20-F, and any updates to those risk factors in our reports of foreign private issuer on Form 6-K incorporated by reference in this prospectus, together with all of the other information appearing or incorporated by reference in this prospectus, and under similar headings in any amendment or supplements to this prospectus.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or passed upon the adequacy or accuracy of this prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

The date of this prospectus is September 21, 2022.

 

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ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS

 

1

FREQUENTLY USED TERMS

 

2

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

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PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

 

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THE OFFERING

 

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RISK FACTORS

 

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USE OF PROCEEDS

 

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DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES

 

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SELLING SECURITYHOLDERS

 

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CERTAIN MATERIAL U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS

 

28

CERTAIN MATERIAL ISRAELI TAX CONSIDERATIONS

 

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PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

 

47

EXPENSES RELATED TO THE OFFERING

 

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LEGAL MATTERS

 

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EXPERTS

 

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WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

 

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INCORPORATION OF CERTAIN DOCUMENTS BY REFERENCE

 

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ENFORCEMENT OF CIVIL LIABILITIES

 

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No one has been authorized to provide you with information that is different from that contained in this prospectus or any free writing prospectus filed by us. This prospectus is dated as of the date set forth on the cover hereof. You should not assume that the information contained in this prospectus is accurate as of any date other than that date.

For investors outside the United States: We have not done anything that would permit this offering or possession or distribution of this prospectus in any jurisdiction where action for that purpose is required, other than in the United States. You are required to inform yourselves about and to observe any restrictions relating to this offering and the distribution of this prospectus.

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ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS

This prospectus is part of a registration statement that we filed with the SEC, utilizing a “shelf” registration process. By using a shelf registration statement, the selling securityholders may sell securities from time to time and in one or more offerings. Any prospectus supplement or free writing prospectus that we file in connection with any specific offering by the selling securityholders may add, update or change information contained in this prospectus. If there is any inconsistency between the information in this prospectus and any applicable prospectus supplement or free writing prospectus, you should rely on the prospectus supplement or free writing prospectus, as applicable. Before purchasing any securities, you should read this prospectus, any applicable prospectus supplement and any applicable free writing prospectus, together with the additional information described under the heading “Where You Can Find More Information” and “Incorporation of Certain Documents by Reference.”

You should rely only on the information contained in or incorporated by reference into this prospectus and any applicable prospectus supplement. We have not authorized anyone to provide you with any information or to make any representations other than those contained in this prospectus, or in any applicable prospectus supplement prepared by or on behalf of us or to which we have referred you. You should assume that the information appearing in this prospectus or any prospectus supplement is accurate only as of the date on its respective cover page and that any information incorporated by reference into any of the foregoing is accurate only as of the date of such document incorporated by reference. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since those dates.

For investors outside the United States: we have not done anything that would permit offerings under this prospectus, or possession or distribution of this prospectus, in any jurisdiction where action for that purpose is required, other than in the United States. Persons outside the United States who come into possession of this prospectus must inform themselves about, and observe any restrictions relating to, the offering of the ordinary shares and the distribution of this prospectus outside of the United States.

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FREQUENTLY USED TERMS

Unless otherwise stated or unless the context otherwise requires, the terms “Company,” “the registrant,” “our company,” “the company,” “we,” “us,” “our,” “ours,” and “Cellebrite” refer to Cellebrite DI Ltd., a company organized under the laws of the State of Israel. In this prospectus:

“Amended Articles” means the amended and restated articles of association of Cellebrite.

“Amended and Restated Warrant Agreement” means that certain Warrant Agreement, dated as of August 30, 2021, by and between the Company and American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, LLC.

“Business Combination” means the Merger and the other transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement.

“Business Combination Agreement” means the Business Combination Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated as of April 8, 2021, by and among TWC, Cellebrite and Merger Sub, as such agreement may be amended or otherwise modified from time to time in accordance with its terms.

“Cellebrite” means Cellebrite DI Ltd., a company organized under the laws of the State of Israel.

“Cellebrite Board” means the board of directors of Cellebrite.

“Closing” means the closing of the Merger and the transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement.

“Closing Date” means the date on which the Closing was completed, on August 30, 2021.

“Code” means the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.

“Effective Time” means the effective time of the Merger pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement.

“Exchange Act” means the U.S. Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.

“IPO” means the initial public offering of units of TWC, consummated on September 15, 2020.

“Merger” means the merger of Merger Sub with and into TWC, with TWC surviving the merger and becoming a wholly-owned subsidiary of Cellebrite, along with the other transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement.

“Merger Sub” means Cupcake Merger Sub, Inc., a Delaware corporation and a direct wholly owned subsidiary of the Company.

“Nasdaq” means the Nasdaq Capital Market.

“Ordinary Shares” means the ordinary shares, par value of NIS 0.00001 per share, of Cellebrite, having one vote per share.

“PIPE Investments” means the purchase of an aggregate of 30,000,000 Ordinary Shares pursuant to the Share Purchase Agreements.

“PIPE Investors” means those certain institutional accredited investors participating in the PIPE Investments pursuant to the Share Purchase Agreements.

“PIPE Shares” means the 30,000,000 Ordinary Shares subscribed for and to be purchased by the PIPE Investors pursuant to the Share Purchase Agreements.

“Private Warrants” means the TWC Warrants sold to the Sponsor in a private placement in connection with the IPO.

“Public Warrants” means the TWC Warrants included in units sold to persons other than the Sponsor in the IPO.

“SEC” means the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

“Securities Act” means the U.S. Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

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“Share Purchase Agreements” means the share purchase agreements entered into by the PIPE Investors, pursuant to which the PIPE Investors have committed to subscribe for and purchase the PIPE Shares at a purchase price per share of $10.00.

“Sponsor” means TWC Tech Holdings II, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, an initial stockholder of TWC.

“Sponsor Warrants” means TWC Warrants sold to the Sponsor in a private placement in connection with the IPO and held by the Sponsor or its permitted transferees.

“Transaction” or “Transactions” means the transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement and the Share Purchase Agreements to occur at or immediately prior to the Closing, including the Merger.

“Trust Account” means the trust account that holds a portion of the proceeds of the IPO and the concurrent sale of the Sponsor Warrants.

“TWC” means TWC Tech Holdings II Corp., a Delaware corporation.

“TWC Warrant” means a warrant of TWC.

“U.S.” means the United States of America.

“U.S. dollar,” “USD,” “US$” and “$” mean the legal currency of the United States.

“U.S. GAAP” means generally accepted accounting principles in the United States.

“Warrants” means the outstanding warrants of Cellebrite.

“Warrant Agreement” means that certain Warrant Agreement, dated as of September 10, 2020, between TWC and American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, LLC.

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CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Certain statements in this prospectus may constitute “forward-looking statements” for purposes of the federal securities laws. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements regarding Cellebrite, or its management team’s expectations, hopes, beliefs, intentions or strategies regarding the future. In addition, any statements that refer to projections, forecasts or other characterizations of future events or circumstances, including any underlying assumptions, are forward-looking statements. The words “anticipate,” “appear,” “approximate,” “believe,” “continue,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “foresee,” “intends,” “may,” “might,” “plan,” “possible,” “potential,” “predict,” “project,” “seek,” “should,” “would” and similar expressions (or the negative version of such words or expressions) may identify forward-looking statements, but the absence of these words does not mean that a statement is not forward-looking. Forward-looking statements in this prospectus may include, for example, statements about Cellebrite’s strategic and business plans, relationships or outlook, the impact of trends on and interest in its business, intellectual property or product, and its future results. The statements we make regarding the following matters are forward-looking by their nature:

        our belief that our largest expansion opportunity lies in delivering solutions to new departments and to new buying centers within existing customers;

        our expectation to extend our DI platform with new SaaS offerings in the next five years;

        our expectation to continue to enter into joint ventures, partnerships, and strategic alliances as part of our long-term business strategy;

        our expectation that we may change our pricing model from time to time;

        our expectation that the decrease of the sale of perpetual licenses to continue;

        our expectation that our gross margin will fluctuate from period to period depending on the interplay of various factors;

        our expectation that our research and development expenses will continue to increase, as we invest in research and development headcount to further strengthen and enhance our solutions;

        our expectation that sales and marketing expenses will continue to increase as we continue to hire additional sales and marketing personnel and invest in sales and marketing programs;

        our anticipation of continuing to incur additional expenses due to growing our operations and being a public company, including higher legal, corporate insurance and accounting expenses;

        our anticipation that a material portion of our expenses will continue to be denominated in ILS;

        our plan to develop future solutions to capture additional revenue opportunities within our customer base and with new customers;

        our plan to continue to increase penetration within our existing customers with our complete DI platform of software and services and by expanding the breadth of our platform capabilities to provide for continued up-sell and cross-selling opportunities across the DI platform and to new buying centers;

        our plan to promote our offerings to address more private sector use cases;

        our plan to tailor our solutions to meet more use cases in enterprise and drive customer growth;

        our plan to increase substantially our subscription business by 2023;

        our intention to drive new customer growth in the private sector by focusing on enterprise accounts and introducing offerings to address customers’ needs (for example, our additional remote collection offering);

        our plan to engage in acquisitions that complement our technology and accelerate time to market; and

        our intention to continue to make efforts to increase our international operations and anticipate that international sales will continue to account for a significant portion of our revenue.

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The preceding list is not intended to be an exhaustive list of all of our forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements are based on our beliefs, assumptions and expectations of future performance, taking into account the information currently available to us. These statements are only predictions based upon our current expectations and projections about future events. There are important factors that could cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to differ materially from the results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. In particular, you should consider the risks provided under “Risk Factors” in our then-most recent Annual Report on Form 20-F, and any updates to those risk factors in our reports of foreign private issuer on Form 6-K incorporated by reference in this prospectus, together with all of the other information appearing or incorporated by reference in this prospectus, and under similar headings in any amendment or supplements to this prospectus.

You should not rely upon forward-looking statements as predictions of future events. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee that future results, levels of activity, performance and events and circumstances reflected in the forward-looking statements will be achieved or will occur. Except as required by law, we undertake no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements for any reason after the date of this prospectus, to conform these statements to actual results or to changes in our expectations.

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PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

This summary highlights selected information from this prospectus and does not contain all of the information that is important to you in making an investment decision. This summary is qualified in its entirety by the more detailed information included in this prospectus. Before making your investment decision with respect to our securities, you should carefully read this entire prospectus.

Unless otherwise indicated or the context otherwise requires, references in this prospectus to “Company”, “we,” “our,” “us” and other similar terms refer to Cellebrite DI Ltd. and our consolidated subsidiaries.

General

Cellebrite DI Ltd. (“Cellebrite”), a company organized under the laws of the State of Israel, is the leading provider of digital intelligence (“DI”), delivering a platform of software and services for legally sanctioned investigations.

On April 8, 2021, Cellebrite entered into a Business Combination Agreement and Plan of Merger (the “Business Combination Agreement”) with TWC Tech Holdings II Corp. (“TWC”), a public listed company in Nasdaq and Cupcake Merger Sub, Inc., a new wholly-owned subsidiary of Cellebrite (the “Merger Sub”) in the USA. TWC is a Special Purpose Acquisition Company (SPAC). On August 30, 2021, the Merger was consummated. Upon the terms and subject to the conditions of the Business Combination Agreement, at the Effective Time, Merger Sub merged with and into TWC, the separate corporate existence of Merger Sub ceased and TWC became the surviving corporation and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Cellebrite (the “Merger”). TWC became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Cellebrite and the securityholders of TWC became securityholders of Cellebrite.

On the date of Closing of the Merger (the “Closing”) and prior to the Merger becoming effective by acceptance of the Merger Certificate for filing by the Secretary of State of the State of Delaware, and prior to the Company’s Preferred Share conversion into Ordinary Shares as described below, an initial dividend of $21,300,000 (“Initial Dividend”) and an additional dividend of $78,700,000 approved by the Israeli District Court (“Additional Dividend”) were paid to the holders of Company’s Ordinary Shares, Preferred Shares and vested restricted stock units (“RSU”) (all the “Company Shareholders”).

On April 8, 2021, concurrently with the execution of the Business Combination Agreement, certain accredited investors (the “PIPE Investors” and each, a “PIPE Investor”) entered into share purchase agreements (the “Share Purchase Agreements” and each, a “Share Purchase Agreement”) pursuant to which the PIPE Investors committed to purchase ordinary shares of Cellebrite (“Ordinary Shares” and each, a “Ordinary Share”) from certain Cellebrite shareholders at a purchase price of $10.00 per share in an aggregate number equal to 30,000,000 and an aggregate purchase price of $300,000,000 (the “PIPE Investments” and each, a “PIPE Investment”) on the Closing Date, which were converted into 30,000,000 shares upon the consummation of the Merger. The PIPE Investment closed immediately prior to the Merger.

Following the closing of the PIPE Investment, and after giving effect to redemptions of shares by shareholders of TWC and payment of transaction expenses, the transactions described above generated approximately $69 million for Cellebrite (resulting in total cash on hand of over $17 million).

The mailing address for Cellebrite’s principal executive office is 94 Shlomo Shmelzer Road, Petah Tikva 4970602, P.O.B 3925 Israel and its telephone number is +972 (73) 394-8000.

Implications of Being an Emerging Growth Company and a Foreign Private Issuer

Emerging Growth Company

Cellebrite is an “emerging growth company,” as defined in Section 2(a) of the Securities Act, as modified by the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”). As such, Cellebrite is eligible to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not “emerging growth companies” including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in their periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements of holding a non-binding advisory vote on executive compensation and stockholder approval of any

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golden parachute payments not previously approved. If some investors find Cellebrite’s securities less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for Cellebrite’s securities and the prices of Cellebrite’s securities may be more volatile.

Further, Section 102(b)(1) of the JOBS Act exempts emerging growth companies from being required to comply with new or revised financial accounting standards until private companies (that is, those that have not had a Securities Act registration statement declared effective or do not have a class of securities registered under the Exchange Act) are required to comply with the new or revised financial accounting standards. The JOBS Act provides that a company can elect to opt out of the extended transition period and comply with the requirements that apply to non-emerging growth companies but any such election to opt out is irrevocable. Cellebrite has elected not to opt out of such extended transition period, which means that when a standard is issued or revised and it has different application dates for public or private companies, Cellebrite, as an emerging growth company, can adopt the new or revised standard at the time private companies adopt the new or revised standard. This may make comparison of Cellebrite’s financial statements with certain other public companies difficult or impossible because of the potential differences in accounting standards used.

Cellebrite will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of: (i) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the Closing, (b) in which Cellebrite has total annual gross revenue of at least $1.235 billion, or (c) in which Cellebrite is deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of Cellebrite’s common equity that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last business day of its most recently completed second fiscal quarter; and (ii) the date on which Cellebrite has issued more than $1.00 billion in non-convertible debt securities during the prior three-year period. References herein to “emerging growth company” have the meaning associated with it in the JOBS Act.

Foreign Private Issuer

Cellebrite is a “foreign private issuer” under SEC rules. Consequently, Cellebrite is subject to the reporting requirements under the Exchange Act applicable to foreign private issuers. Cellebrite filed its annual report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2021 with the SEC on March 29, 2022, and will be required to file its annual report on Form 20-F for the year ending December 31, 2022 with the SEC by April 30, 2023. In addition, Cellebrite will furnish reports of foreign private issuer on Form 6-K to the SEC regarding certain information required to be publicly disclosed by Cellebrite in Israel or that is distributed or required to be distributed by Cellebrite to its shareholders. Cellebrite also expects to issue interim quarterly financial information publicly and to furnish it to the SEC under the cover of Form 6-K.

Based on its foreign private issuer status, Cellebrite will not be required to file periodic reports and financial statements with the SEC as frequently or as promptly as a U.S. company whose securities are registered under the Exchange Act. Cellebrite will also not be required to comply with Regulation FD, which addresses certain restrictions on the selective disclosure of material information. In addition, among other matters, Cellebrite officers, directors and principal shareholders will be exempt from the reporting and “short-swing” profit recovery provisions of Section 16 of the Exchange Act and the rules under the Exchange Act with respect to their purchases and sales of Ordinary Shares.

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THE OFFERING

Securities offered by the Selling Securityholders

 

We are registering the resale by the Sponsor and the Selling Securityholders named in this prospectus, or their permitted transferees, of 171,729,210 Ordinary Shares and Warrants to purchase 9,666,667 Ordinary Shares. We are also registering up to 20,000,000 Ordinary Shares issuable upon exercise of the Public Warrants that were previously registered and up to 9,666,667 Ordinary Shares underlying private placement warrants issued in a private placement to the Sponsor.

Terms of the Offering

 

The Selling Securityholders will determine when and how they will dispose of the Ordinary Shares and warrants registered under this prospectus for resale.

Shares outstanding prior to the offering

 

As of June 30, 2022, we had 189,649,267 Ordinary Shares issued and outstanding. This number of Ordinary Shares excludes 29,666,167 Ordinary Shares issuable upon the exercise of Warrants with an exercise price of $11.50 per share.

Use of proceeds

 

We will not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of the warrants or Ordinary Shares by the Selling Securityholders except with respect to amounts received by us due to the exercise of the warrants. We expect to use the proceeds received from the exercise of the warrants, if any, for working capital and general corporate purposes.

Nasdaq ticker symbol

 

Our Ordinary Shares and warrants are listed on Nasdaq under the symbols “CLBT” and “CLBTW,” respectively.

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RISK FACTORS

An investment in our securities involves a high degree of risk. Before making an investment decision, you should carefully consider the risks described in our then-most recent annual report on Form 20-F, and any updates to those risk factors in our reports of foreign private issuer on Form 6-K incorporated by reference in this prospectus, together with all of the other information appearing or incorporated by reference in this prospectus or any prospectus supplement hereto. Our business, prospects, financial condition, or operating results could be harmed by any of these risks, as well as other risks not known to us or that we consider immaterial as of the date of this prospectus. The trading price of our securities could decline due to any of these risks, and, as a result, you may lose all or part of your investment.

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USE OF PROCEEDS

All of the ordinary shares offered by the Selling Securityholders pursuant to this prospectus will be sold by the Selling Securityholders for their respective amounts. We will not receive any of the proceeds from these sales.

We will receive up to an aggregate of approximately $341 million from the exercise of the warrants, assuming the exercise in full of all such warrants for cash. We expect to use the net proceeds from the exercise of the warrants for general corporate purposes, which may include acquisitions and other business opportunities and the repayment of indebtedness. Our management will have broad discretion over the use of proceeds from the exercise of the warrants.

There is no assurance that the holders of the warrants will elect to exercise any or all of the warrants. To the extent that the warrants are exercised on a “cashless basis,” the amount of cash we would receive from the exercise of the warrants will decrease.

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DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES

Description of Ordinary Shares

The following is a description of the material terms of the Amended Articles. The following descriptions of share capital and provisions of the Amended Articles are summarized and are qualified by reference to the Amended Articles.

Share Capital

As of June 30, 2022, our authorized share capital consists of 3,454,112,863 Ordinary Shares, par value ILS 0.00001, of which 189, 649,267 shares are issued and outstanding.

The Cellebrite Board may determine the issue prices and terms for such shares or other securities, and may further determine any other provision relating to such issue of shares or securities. We may also issue and redeem redeemable securities on such terms and in such manner as the Cellebrite Board shall determine.

All of our outstanding Ordinary Shares are validly issued, fully paid and non-assessable. Our Ordinary Shares are not redeemable and do not have any preemptive rights.

Registration Number and Purposes of the Company

We are registered with the Israeli Registrar of Companies. Our registration number is 51-276657-7. Our affairs are governed by the Amended Articles, applicable Israeli law and the Israeli Companies Law (the “Companies Law”). Our purpose as set forth in the Amended Articles is to carry on any business, and do any act, which is not prohibited by law.

Voting Rights

All Ordinary Shares have identical voting and other rights in all respects.

Transfer of Shares

Our fully paid Ordinary Shares are issued in registered form and, except as otherwise set forth under the Amended Articles, may be freely transferred under such Amended Articles, unless the transfer is restricted or prohibited by another instrument, applicable law or the rules of Nasdaq. The ownership or voting of our Ordinary Shares by non-residents of Israel is not restricted in any way by the Amended Articles or the laws of the State of Israel, except for ownership by nationals of some countries that are considered enemies of Israel under the applicable legislation (currently being Iran, Syria and Lebanon) and as may be restricted pursuant to laws relating to our regulatory licenses.

Election of Directors

Under the Amended Articles, the Cellebrite Board must consist of not less than three but no more than eleven directors. Pursuant to the Amended Articles, five directors (excluding external directors) were appointed by the Sponsor, SUNCORPORATION and IGP, with the Sponsor and SUNCORPORATION each having appointed two members and IGP having appointed one. Other directors were appointed by a simple majority vote of holders of our Ordinary Shares, having participated and voted at an annual general meeting of our shareholders, according to the provisions set out in the Amended Articles, which set out that (i) in the event of a contested election, the method of calculation of the votes and the manner in which the resolutions will be presented to our shareholders at the general meeting shall be determined by the Cellebrite Board in its discretion, and (ii) in the event that the Cellebrite Board does not or is unable to make a determination on such matter, then the directors will be elected by a majority of the voting power represented at the general meeting in person or by proxy and voting on the election of directors provided that if the number of nominees so elected exceeds the number of directors that are proposed by the board of directors to be elected, then as among such elected nominees the election shall be by a plurality of the votes cast. In addition, our directors are divided into three classes, one class being elected each year at the annual general meeting of our shareholders, and serve on the Cellebrite Board until the third annual general meeting following such election or re-election or until they are removed by a vote of 65% of the total voting power of our shareholders (subject to the appointment rights of the Sponsor, SUNCORPORATION and IGP) at a general meeting of our shareholders or

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upon the occurrence of certain events in accordance with the Companies Law and the Amended Articles. In addition, the Amended Articles provide that vacancies on the Cellebrite Board may be filled by a vote of a simple majority of the directors then in office. A director so appointed will hold office until the next annual general meeting of our shareholders for the election of the class of directors in respect of which the vacancy was created, or in the case of a vacancy due to the number of directors being less than the maximum number of directors stated in the Amended Articles, until the next annual general meeting of our shareholders for the election of the class of directors to which such director was assigned by the Cellebrite Board.

Dividend and Liquidation Rights

We may declare a dividend to be paid to the holders of our Ordinary Shares in proportion to their respective shareholdings. Under the Companies Law, dividend distributions are determined by the board of directors and do not require the approval of the shareholders of a company unless the company’s articles of association provide otherwise. The Amended Articles do not require shareholder approval of a dividend distribution and provide that dividend distributions may be determined by the Cellebrite Board.

Pursuant to the Companies Law, the distribution amount is limited to the greater of retained earnings or earnings generated over the previous two years, according to our then last reviewed or audited financial statements (less the amount of previously distributed dividends, if not reduced from the earnings), provided that the end of the period to which the financial statements relate is not more than six months prior to the date of the distribution. If we do not meet such criteria, then we may distribute dividends only with court approval. In each case, we are only permitted to distribute a dividend if the Cellebrite Board and, if applicable, the court determines that there is no reasonable concern that payment of the dividend will prevent us from satisfying our existing and foreseeable obligations as they become due.

In the event of our liquidation, after satisfaction of liabilities to creditors, our assets will be distributed to the holders of our Ordinary Shares in proportion to their shareholdings. This right, as well as the right to receive dividends, may be affected by the grant of preferential dividend or distribution rights to the holders of a class of shares with preferential rights that may be authorized in the future.

Exchange Controls

There are currently no Israeli currency control restrictions on remittances of dividends on our Ordinary Shares, proceeds from the sale of the Ordinary Shares or interest or other payments to non-residents of Israel, except for shareholders who are subjects of countries that are considered enemies of Israel under the applicable legislation (currently being Iran, Syria and Lebanon).

Registration Rights

Certain of our shareholders are entitled to certain registration rights under the terms of our Shareholders’ Rights Agreement.

Shareholder Meetings

Under Israeli law, we are required to hold an annual general meeting of our shareholders once every calendar year and no later than 15 months after the date of the previous annual general meeting. All meetings other than the annual general meeting of shareholders are referred to in the Amended Articles as special general meetings. The Cellebrite Board may call special general meetings of our shareholders whenever it sees fit, at such time and place, within or outside of Israel, as it may determine. In addition, the Companies Law provides that the Cellebrite Board is required to convene a special general meeting of our shareholders upon the written request of (i) any two or more of our directors, (ii) one-quarter or more of the serving members of the Cellebrite Board or (iii) one or more shareholders holding, in the aggregate, either (a) 5% or more of our outstanding issued shares and 1% or more of our outstanding voting power or (b) 5% or more of our outstanding voting power.

Under Israeli law, one or more shareholders holding at least 1% of the voting rights at the general meeting of shareholders may request that the board of directors include a matter in the agenda of a general meeting of shareholders

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to be convened in the future, provided that it is appropriate to discuss such a matter at the general meeting. The Amended Articles contain procedural requirements and disclosure items with respect to the submission of shareholder proposals for general meetings.

Subject to the provisions of the Companies Law and the regulations promulgated thereunder, shareholders entitled to participate and vote at general meetings of shareholders are the shareholders of record on a date to be decided by the board of directors, which, as a company listed on an exchange outside Israel, may be between four and 40 (forty) days prior to the date of the meeting. Furthermore, the Companies Law requires that resolutions regarding the following matters must be passed at a general meeting of shareholders:

        amendments to our articles of association;

        appointment, terms of service or and termination of service of our auditors;

        appointment of directors, including external directors (if applicable);

        approval of certain related party transactions;

        increases or reductions of our authorized share capital;

        a merger;

        voluntary liquidation; and

        the exercise of the Cellebrite Board’s powers by a general meeting, if the Cellebrite Board is unable to exercise its powers and the exercise of any of its powers is required for our proper management.

The Companies Law requires that a notice of any annual general meeting or special general meeting be provided to shareholders at least 21 days prior to the meeting and, if the agenda of the meeting includes (among other things) the appointment or removal of directors, the approval of transactions with office holders or interested or related parties, or an approval of a merger, notice must be provided at least 35 days prior to the meeting. Under the Companies Law and the Amended Articles, shareholders are not permitted to take action by way of written consent in lieu of a meeting.

Quorum

Pursuant to the Amended Articles, holders of our Ordinary Shares have one vote for each ordinary share held on all matters submitted to a vote before the shareholders at a general meeting of shareholders. The quorum required for our general meetings of shareholders consists of at least two shareholders present in person or by proxy who hold or represent between them at least 25% (or 33.33%, if the meeting is not convened by our board) of the total outstanding voting rights, within half an hour of the time fixed for the commencement of the general meeting. A general meeting adjourned for lack of a quorum shall be adjourned either to the same day in the next week, at the same time and place, to such day and at such time and place as indicated in the notice to such meeting, or to such day and at such time and place as the chairperson of the meeting shall determine. At the reconvened meeting, any number of shareholders present in person or by proxy shall constitute a quorum, unless a meeting was called pursuant to a request by our shareholders, in which case the quorum required is one or more shareholders, present in person or by proxy and holding the number of shares required to call the meeting as described above.

Vote Requirements

The Amended Articles provide that all resolutions of our shareholders require a simple majority vote, unless otherwise required by the Companies Law or by the Amended Articles (as amended from time to time). Under the Companies Law, certain actions require the approval of a special majority, including: (i) an extraordinary transaction with a controlling shareholder or in which the controlling shareholder has a personal interest, (ii) the terms of employment or other engagement of a controlling shareholder of the company or a controlling shareholder’s relative (even if such terms are not extraordinary) and (iii) certain compensation-related matters described under “Management — Compensation Committee — Compensation Policy under the Companies Law.” Pursuant to the Companies Law, controlling shareholder for that purpose includes, inter alia, a holder of 25% or more of the voting rights if no other person holds 50% or more of the voting rights. Under the Amended Articles, the alteration of the rights, privileges, preferences or obligations of Ordinary Shares requires the approval of a simple majority of all of the Ordinary Shares voting at a shareholder meeting.

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Under the Amended Articles, the approval of the holders of at least 65% of the total voting power of our shareholders is generally required to remove any of our directors from office (excluding a Sponsor Director, a SUN Director and IGP Director), or to amend the provision requiring the approval of at least 65% of the total voting power of our shareholders to remove any of our directors from office, or certain other provisions regarding our staggered board, shareholder proposals, the size of our board and plurality voting in contested elections. Another exception to the simple majority vote requirement is a resolution for the voluntary winding up, or an approval of a scheme of arrangement or reorganization, of the company pursuant to Section 350 of the Companies Law, which requires the approval of holders holding at least 75% of the voting rights represented at the meeting and voting on the resolution.

Access to Corporate Records

Under the Companies Law, all shareholders generally have the right to review minutes of our general meetings, our shareholder register (including with respect to material shareholders), our articles of association, our financial statements, other documents as provided in the Companies Law, and any document we are required by law to file publicly with the Israeli Registrar of Companies or the Israeli Securities Authority. Any shareholder who specifies the purpose of its request may request to review any document in our possession that relates to any action or transaction with a related party which requires shareholder approval under the Companies Law. We may deny a request to review a document if we determine that the request was not made in good faith, that the document contains a trade secret or a patent or that the document’s disclosure may otherwise impair our interests.

Acquisitions under Israeli Law

Full Tender Offer

A person wishing to acquire shares of a public Israeli company who would, as a result, hold over 90% of the target company’s voting rights or the target company’s issued and outstanding share capital (or of a class thereof), is required by the Companies Law to make a tender offer to all of the company’s shareholders for the purchase of all of the issued and outstanding shares of the company (or the applicable class). If (a) the shareholders who do not accept the offer hold less than 5% of the issued and outstanding share capital of the company (or the applicable class) and the shareholders who accept the offer constitute a majority of the offerees that do not have a personal interest in the acceptance of the tender offer or (b) the shareholders who did not accept the tender offer hold less than 2% of the issued and outstanding share capital of the company (or of the applicable class), all of the shares that the acquirer offered to purchase will be transferred to the acquirer by operation of law. A shareholder who had its shares so transferred may petition an Israeli court within six months from the date of acceptance of the full tender offer, regardless of whether such shareholder agreed to the offer, to determine whether the tender offer was for less than fair value and whether the fair value should be paid as determined by the court. However, an offeror may provide in the offer that a shareholder who accepted the offer will not be entitled to petition the court for appraisal rights as described in the preceding sentence, as long as the offeror and the company disclosed the information required by law in connection with the full tender offer. If the full tender offer was not accepted in accordance with any of the above alternatives, the acquirer may not acquire shares of the company that will increase its holdings to more than 90% of the company’s voting rights or the company’s issued and outstanding share capital (or of the applicable class) from shareholders who accepted the tender offer. Shares purchased in contradiction to the full tender offer rules under the Companies Law will have no rights and will become dormant shares.

The Companies Law provides that an acquisition of shares of an Israeli public company must be made by means of a special tender offer if as a result of the acquisition the purchaser would become a holder of 25% or more of the voting rights in the company. This requirement does not apply if there is already another holder of 25% or more of the voting rights in the company. Similarly, the Companies Law provides that an acquisition of shares of an Israeli public company must be made by means of a special tender offer if as a result of the acquisition the purchaser would become a holder of more than 45% of the voting rights in the company, if there is no other shareholder of the company who holds more than 45% of the voting rights in the company. These requirements do not apply if (i) the acquisition occurs in the context of a private placement by the company that received shareholders’ approval as a private placement whose purpose is to give the purchaser 25% or more of the voting rights in the company, if there is no person who holds 25% or more of the voting rights in the company or as a private placement whose purpose is to give the purchaser 45% of the voting rights in the company, if there is no person who holds 45% of the voting rights in the company, (ii) the acquisition was from a shareholder holding 25% or more of the voting rights in the company and resulted in the purchaser becoming a holder of 25% or more of the voting rights in the company, or (iii) the acquisition

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was from a shareholder holding more than 45% of the voting rights in the company and resulted in the purchaser becoming a holder of more than 45% of the voting rights in the company. A special tender offer must be extended to all shareholders of a company. A special tender offer may be consummated only if (i) at least 5% of the voting power attached to the company’s outstanding shares will be acquired by the offeror and (ii) the number of shares tendered in the offer exceeds the number of shares whose holders objected to the offer (excluding the purchaser, its controlling shareholders, holders of 25% or more of the voting rights in the company and any person having a personal interest in the acceptance of the tender offer, or anyone on their behalf, including any such person’s relatives and entities under their control).

In the event that a special tender offer is made, a company’s board of directors is required to express its opinion on the advisability of the offer, or shall abstain from expressing any opinion if it is unable to do so, provided that it gives the reasons for its abstention. The board of directors shall also disclose any personal interest that any of the directors has with respect to the special tender offer or in connection therewith. An office holder in a target company who, in his or her capacity as an office holder, performs an action the purpose of which is to cause the failure of an existing or foreseeable special tender offer or is to impair the chances of its acceptance, is liable to the potential purchaser and shareholders for damages, unless such office holder acted in good faith and had reasonable grounds to believe he or she was acting for the benefit of the company. However, office holders of the target company may negotiate with the potential purchaser in order to improve the terms of the special tender offer, and may further negotiate with third parties in order to obtain a competing offer.

If a special tender offer is accepted, then shareholders who did not respond to or that had objected the offer may accept the offer within four days of the last day set for the acceptance of the offer and they will be considered to have accepted the offer from the first day it was made.

In the event that a special tender offer is accepted, then the purchaser or any person or entity controlling it or under common control with the purchaser or such controlling person or entity at the time of the offer may not make a subsequent tender offer for the purchase of shares of the target company and may not enter into a merger with the target company for a period of one year from the date of the offer, unless the purchaser or such person or entity undertook to effect such an offer or merger in the initial special tender offer. Shares purchased in contradiction to the special tender offer rules under the Companies Law will have no rights and will become dormant shares.

Merger

The Companies Law permits merger transactions if approved by each party’s board of directors and, unless certain conditions described under the Companies Law are met, a simple majority of the outstanding shares of each party to the merger that are represented and voting on the merger. The board of directors of a merging company is required pursuant to the Companies Law to discuss and determine whether in its opinion there exists a reasonable concern that as a result of a proposed merger, the surviving company will not be able to satisfy its obligations towards its creditors, such determination taking into account the financial status of the merging companies. If the board of directors determines that such a concern exists, it may not approve a proposed merger. Following the approval of the board of directors of each of the merging companies, the boards of directors must jointly prepare and sign a merger proposal for submission to the Israeli Registrar of Companies.

For purposes of the shareholder vote of a merging company whose shares are held by the other merging company, or by a person or entity holding 25% or more of the voting rights at the general meeting of shareholders of the other merging company, or by a person or entity holding the right to appoint 25% or more of the directors of the other merging company, unless a court rules otherwise, the merger will not be deemed approved if a majority of the shares voted on the matter at the general meeting of shareholders (excluding abstentions) that are held by shareholders other than the other party to the merger, or by any person or entity who holds 25% or more of the voting rights of the other party or the right to appoint 25% or more of the directors of the other party, or any one on their behalf including their relatives or corporations controlled by any of them, vote against the merger. In addition, if the non-surviving entity of the merger has more than one class of shares, the merger must be approved by each class of shareholders. If the transaction would have been approved but for the separate approval of each class or the exclusion of the votes of certain shareholders as provided above, a court may still approve the merger upon the request of holders of at least 25% of the voting rights of a company, if the court holds that the merger is fair and reasonable, taking into account the

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valuation of the merging companies and the consideration offered to the shareholders. If a merger is with a company’s controlling shareholder or if the controlling shareholder has a personal interest in the merger, then the merger is instead subject to the same special majority approval that governs all extraordinary transactions with controlling shareholders.

Under the Companies Law, each merging company must deliver to its secured creditors the merger proposal and inform its unsecured creditors of the merger proposal and its content. Upon the request of a creditor of either party to the proposed merger, the court may delay or prevent the merger if it concludes that there exists a reasonable concern that, as a result of the merger, the surviving company will be unable to satisfy the obligations of the merging company, and may further give instructions to secure the rights of creditors.

In addition, a merger may not be completed unless at least 50 days have passed from the date that a proposal for approval of the merger is filed with the Israeli Registrar of Companies and 30 days from the date that shareholder approval of both merging companies is obtained.

Anti-Takeover Measures

The Companies Law allows us to create and issue shares having rights different from those attached to our Ordinary Shares, including shares providing certain preferred rights with respect to voting, distributions or other matters and shares having preemptive rights. No preferred shares are authorized under the Amended Articles. In the future, if we do authorize, create and issue a specific class of preferred shares, such class of shares, depending on the specific rights that may be attached to it, may have the ability to frustrate or prevent a takeover or otherwise prevent our shareholders from realizing a potential premium over the market value of their Ordinary Shares. The authorization and designation of a class of preferred shares will require an amendment to the Amended Articles, which requires the prior approval of the holders of a majority of the voting power attached to our issued and outstanding shares at a general meeting of shareholders. The convening of the meeting, the shareholders entitled to participate and the vote required to be obtained at such a meeting will be subject to the requirements set forth in the Companies Law and the Amended Articles, as described above in “— Shareholder Meetings.” In addition, as disclosed under “— Election of Directors,” we have a classified board structure, which effectively limits the ability of any investor or potential investor or group of investors or potential investors to gain control of the Cellebrite Board.

Borrowing Powers

Pursuant to the Companies Law and the Amended Articles, the Cellebrite Board may exercise all powers and take all actions that are not required under law or under the Amended Articles to be exercised or taken by our shareholders, including the power to borrow money for company purposes.

Changes in Capital

The Amended Articles enable us to increase or reduce our share capital. Any such changes are subject to Israeli law and must be approved by a resolution duly passed by our shareholders at a general meeting of shareholders. In addition, transactions that have the effect of reducing capital, such as the declaration and payment of dividends in the absence of sufficient retained earnings or profits, require the approval of both the Cellebrite Board and an Israeli court.

Exclusive Forum

The Amended Articles provide that unless we consent in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the federal district courts of the United States of America shall be the exclusive forum for the resolution of any complaint asserting a cause of action arising under the Securities Act. Section 22 of the Securities Act, however, creates concurrent jurisdiction for federal and state courts over all suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Securities Act or the rules and regulations thereunder. Accordingly, there is uncertainty as to whether a court would enforce such provisions, and the enforceability of similar choice of forum provisions in other companies’ charter documents has been challenged in legal proceedings. While Delaware and certain U.S. state courts have determined that such exclusive forum provisions are facially valid, a shareholder may nevertheless seek to bring a claim in a venue other than those designated in the exclusive forum provisions, and there can be no assurance that such provisions will be enforced by a court in those other jurisdictions. Any person or entity purchasing or otherwise acquiring any interest in our securities shall be deemed to have notice of and consented to these provisions; however, we note that investors cannot waive compliance with the federal securities laws and the rules and regulations thereunder.

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Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Amended Articles provide that the exclusive forum provision does not apply to suits brought to enforce a duty or liability created by the Exchange Act or any other claim for which the federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction. Section 27 of the Exchange Act creates exclusive federal jurisdiction over all suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Exchange Act or the rules and regulations thereunder.

The Amended Articles also provide that unless we consent in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the competent courts in Tel Aviv, Israel shall be the exclusive forum for any derivative action or proceeding brought on behalf of the Company, any action asserting a breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any of our directors, officers or other employees to the Company or our shareholders or any action asserting a claim arising pursuant to any provision of the Companies Law or the Israeli Securities Law. Israeli courts typically enforce exclusive jurisdiction provisions. However, in some cases parties have successfully challenged such provisions. Therefore, there is no absolute assurance that such provision will be enforced by an Israeli court.

Transfer Agent and Registrar

The transfer agent and registrar for our Ordinary Shares is American Stock Transfer & Trust Company, LLC. Its address is 6201 15th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219, and its telephone number is (800) 937-5549.

Listing.

Our Ordinary Shares are listed on Nasdaq under the ticker symbol “CLBT”.

Description of Warrants

Public Warrants

Each whole Warrant entitles the registered holder to purchase one Ordinary Share, at a price of $11.50 per share, subject to adjustment as discussed below. Pursuant to the Amended and Restated Warrant Agreement, a warrant holder may exercise its Warrants only for a whole number of Ordinary Shares. This means only a whole Warrant may be exercised at a given time by a warrant holder. The Warrants will expire on August 30, 2026 after the completion of our Business Combination, at 5:00 p.m., New York City time, or earlier upon redemption.

Cellebrite will not be obligated to deliver any Ordinary Shares pursuant to the exercise of a Warrant and will have no obligation to settle such warrant exercise unless a registration statement under the Securities Act covering the issuance of the Ordinary Shares issuable upon exercise of the Warrants is then effective and a current prospectus relating to those Ordinary Shares is available, subject to Cellebrite satisfying its registration obligations. No Warrant will be exercisable for cash or on a “cashless basis” in accordance with Section 3(a)(9) of the Securities Act, and Cellebrite will not be obligated to issue any Ordinary Share to holders seeking to exercise their Warrants, unless the issuance of the Ordinary Shares upon such exercise is registered or qualified under the securities laws of the state of the exercising holder, or an exemption from registration is available. In the event that the conditions in the two immediately preceding sentences are not satisfied with respect to a Warrant, the holder of such warrant will not be entitled to exercise such warrant and such warrant may have no value and expire worthless. During any period when Cellebrite will have failed to maintain an effective registration statement, warrant holders will be able to, until such time when there is an effective registration statement, exercise their Warrants on a cashless basis, provided that such exemption is available. If that exemption, or another exemption, is not available, warrant holders will not be able to exercise their warrants on a cashless basis.

Redemption of Warrants

Redemption of Warrants when the price per Ordinary Share equals or exceeds $18.00.

Cellebrite will be able to call the Warrants for redemption:

        in whole and not in part;

        at a price of $0.01 per Warrant;

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        upon a minimum of 30 days’ prior written notice of redemption, or the 30-day redemption period, to each warrant holder; and

        if, and only if, the closing price of Ordinary Shares equals or exceeds $18.00 per share (as adjusted for stock splits, stock dividends, reorganizations, recapitalizations and the like) for any 20 trading days within a 30-trading day period ending on the third trading day prior to the date on which Cellebrite sends the notice of redemption to the warrant holders.

If and when the Warrants become redeemable pursuant to the foregoing redemption conditions, Cellebrite will be able to exercise its redemption right even if Cellebrite is unable to register or qualify the underlying securities for sale under all applicable state securities laws.

Cellebrite will establish the last of the foregoing redemption conditions to prevent a redemption call unless there is at the time of the call a significant premium to the exercise price of the Warrants. If the foregoing redemption conditions are satisfied and Cellebrite issues a notice of redemption of the Warrants, each warrant holder will be entitled to exercise their Warrants prior to the scheduled redemption date. However, the price of the Ordinary Shares may fall below the $18.00 redemption trigger price as well as the $11.50 exercise price of the Warrants after the redemption notice is issued.

Redemption of Warrants when the price per Ordinary Share equals or exceeds $10.00.

Cellebrite will be able to call the Warrants for redemption:

        in whole and not in part;

        at a price of $0.10 per Warrant;

        upon a minimum of 30 days’ prior written notice of redemption, provided that holders will be able to exercise their Warrants on a cashless basis prior to redemption and receive that number of Ordinary Shares determined by reference to the table below, based on the redemption date and the fair market value (as defined below) of one Ordinary Share, and except as otherwise described below;

        if, and only if, the closing price of the Ordinary Shares equals or exceeds $10.00 per share (as adjusted for adjustments to the number of Ordinary Shares issuable upon exercise or the exercise price of a Warrant as described under the section of this prospectus titled “— Anti-Dilution Adjustments”) on the trading day prior to the date on which Cellebrite sends the notice of redemption to the warrant holders; and

        if, and only if, the closing price of the Ordinary Shares (as adjusted for stock splits, stock dividends, reorganizations, recapitalizations and the like) for any 20 trading days within a 30-trading day period ending on the third trading day prior to the date on which Cellebrite sends the notice of redemption to the warrant holders is less than $18.00 per share (as adjusted for share splits, share dividends, reorganizations, recapitalizations and the like), then the Warrants held by the Sponsor must also concurrently be called for redemption on the same terms (except as described herein with respect to a holder’s ability to cashless exercise its Warrants) as the Warrants held by Public Warrant holders.

Beginning on the date the notice of redemption is given until the Warrants are redeemed or exercised, holders may elect to exercise their Warrants on a cashless basis. The numbers in the table below represent the number of Ordinary Shares that a warrant holder will receive upon such cashless exercise in connection with a redemption by Cellebrite pursuant to this redemption feature, based on the “fair market value” of the Ordinary Shares on the corresponding redemption date (assuming holders elect to exercise their Warrants and such warrants are not redeemed for $0.10 per warrant), determined for these purposes based on the volume weighted average price of the Ordinary Shares for the 10 trading days immediately following the date on which the notice of redemption is sent to the holders of Warrants, and the number of months that the corresponding redemption date precedes the expiration date of the Warrants, each as set forth in the table below. Cellebrite will provide its warrant holders with the final fair market value no later than one business day immediately following the 10 trading day period described above ends.

The share prices set forth in the column headings of the table below will be adjusted as of any date on which the number of Ordinary Shares issuable upon exercise of a Warrant or the exercise price of a Warrant is adjusted as set forth under the section of this prospectus titled “— Anti-Dilution Adjustments” below. If the number of shares

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issuable upon exercise of a warrant is adjusted, the adjusted share prices in the column headings will equal the share prices immediately prior to such adjustment, multiplied by a fraction, the numerator of which is the exercise price of the Warrant after such adjustment and the denominator of which is the price of the Warrant immediately prior to such adjustment. In such an event, the number of Ordinary Shares in the table below shall be adjusted by multiplying such share amounts by a fraction, the numerator of which is the number of Ordinary Shares deliverable upon exercise of a Warrant immediately prior to such adjustment and the denominator of which is the number of Ordinary Shares deliverable upon exercise of a Warrant as so adjusted. If the exercise price of a Warrant is adjusted, (a) in the case of an adjustment pursuant to the fifth paragraph under the section of this prospectus titled “— Anti-Dilution Adjustments” below, the adjusted share prices in the column headings will equal the unadjusted share price multiplied by a fraction, the numerator of which is the higher of the Market Value and the Newly Issuance Price (each as defined in the Amended and Restated Warrant Agreement) as set forth under the section of this prospectus titled “— Anti-Dilution Adjustments” and the denominator of which is $10.00 and (b) in the case of an adjustment pursuant to the second paragraph under the section of this prospectus titled “— Anti-Dilution Adjustments” below, the adjusted share prices in the column headings will equal the unadjusted share price less the decrease in the exercise price of a Warrant pursuant to such exercise price adjustment.

Redemption date (period to expiration of Warrants)

 

Fair Market Value of Ordinary Share

<10.00

 

11.00

 

12.00

 

13.00

 

14.00

 

15.00

 

16.00

 

17.00

 

>18.00

60 months

 

0.261

 

0.281

 

0.297

 

0.311

 

0.324

 

0.337

 

0.348

 

0.358

 

0.361

57 months

 

0.257

 

0.277

 

0.294

 

0.310

 

0.324

 

0.337

 

0.348

 

0.358

 

0.361

54 months

 

0.252

 

0.272

 

0.291

 

0.307

 

0.322

 

0.335

 

0.347

 

0.357

 

0.361

51 months

 

0.246

 

0.268

 

0.287

 

0.304

 

0.320

 

0.333

 

0.346

 

0.357

 

0.361

48 months

 

0.241

 

0.263

 

0.283

 

0.301

 

0.317

 

0.332

 

0.344

 

0.356

 

0.361

45 months

 

0.235

 

0.258

 

0.279

 

0.298

 

0.315

 

0.330

 

0.343

 

0.356

 

0.361

42 months

 

0.228

 

0.252

 

0.274

 

0.294

 

0.312

 

0.328

 

0.342

 

0.355

 

0.361

39 months

 

0.221

 

0.246

 

0.269

 

0.290

 

0.309

 

0.325

 

0.340

 

0.354

 

0.361

36 months

 

0.213

 

0.239

 

0.263

 

0.285

 

0.305

 

0.323

 

0.339

 

0.353

 

0.361

33 months

 

0.205

 

0.232

 

0.257

 

0.280

 

0.301

 

0.320

 

0.337

 

0.352

 

0.361

30 months

 

0.196

 

0.224

 

0.250

 

0.274

 

0.297

 

0.316

 

0.335

 

0.351

 

0.361

27 months

 

0.185

 

0.214

 

0.242

 

0.268

 

0.291

 

0.313

 

0.332

 

0.350

 

0.361

24 months

 

0.173

 

0.204

 

0.233

 

0.260

 

0.285

 

0.308

 

0.329

 

0.348

 

0.361

21 months

 

0.161

 

0.193

 

0.223

 

0.252

 

0.279

 

0.304

 

0.326

 

0.347

 

0.361

18 months

 

0.146

 

0.179

 

0.211

 

0.242

 

0.271

 

0.298

 

0.322

 

0.345

 

0.361

15 months

 

0.130

 

0.164

 

0.197

 

0.230

 

0.262

 

0.291

 

0.317

 

0.342

 

0.361

12 months

 

0.111

 

0.146

 

0.181

 

0.216

 

0.250

 

0.282

 

0.312

 

0.339

 

0.361

9 months

 

0.090

 

0.125

 

0.162

 

0.199

 

0.237

 

0.272

 

0.305

 

0.336

 

0.361

6 months

 

0.065

 

0.099

 

0.137

 

0.178

 

0.219

 

0.259

 

0.296

 

0.331

 

0.361

3 months

 

0.034

 

0.065

 

0.104

 

0.150

 

0.197

 

0.243

 

0.286

 

0.326

 

0.361

0 months

 

 

 

0.042

 

0.115

 

0.179

 

0.233

 

0.281

 

0.323

 

0.361

The exact fair market value and redemption date may not be set forth in the table above, in which case, if the fair market value is between two values in the table or the redemption date is between two redemption dates in the table, the number of Ordinary Shares to be issued for each Warrant exercised will be determined by a straight-line interpolation between the number of Ordinary Shares set forth for the higher and lower fair market values and the earlier and later redemption dates, as applicable, based on a 365 or 366-day year, as applicable. For example, if the volume weighted average price of the Ordinary Shares for the 10 trading days ending on the third trading day prior to the date on which the notice of redemption is sent to the holders of the Warrants is $11.00 per share, and at such time there are 57 months until the expiration of the Warrants, holders may choose to, in connection with this redemption feature, exercise their Warrants for 0.277 Ordinary Shares for each whole Warrant. For an example where the exact fair market value and redemption date are not as set forth in the table above, if the volume weighted average price of the Ordinary Shares for the 10 trading days ending on the third trading day prior to the date on which the notice of redemption is sent to the holders of the Warrants is $13.50 per share, and at such time there are 38 months until the expiration of the Warrants, holders may choose to, in connection with this redemption feature, exercise their Warrants for 0.298 Ordinary Shares for each whole Warrant. In no event will the Warrants be exercisable on a cashless basis in connection with this redemption feature for more than 0.361 Ordinary Shares per warrant (subject to adjustment). Finally, as reflected in

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the table above, if the Warrants are out of the money and about to expire, they cannot be exercised on a cashless basis in connection with a redemption by Cellebrite pursuant to this redemption feature, since they will not be exercisable for any Ordinary Shares.

This redemption feature differs from the typical warrant redemption features used in some other business combinations, which typically only provide for a redemption of warrants for cash (other than the warrants held by the sponsor entity) when the trading price for the underlying Ordinary Share equals or exceeds one specified higher per share price (such as $18.00 per Ordinary Share, as described in this prospectus) for a specified period of time. This redemption feature is structured to allow for all of the outstanding Ordinary Share to be redeemed when the Ordinary Shares are trading at or above $10.00 per share, which may be at a time when the trading price of Ordinary Shares is below the exercise price of the Warrants. Cellebrite will establish this redemption feature to provide itself with the flexibility to redeem the Warrants without such warrants having to reach the $18.00 per share threshold set forth above under the section of this prospectus titled “Redemption of Warrants when the price per Cellebrite Ordinary Share equals or exceeds $18.00.” Holders choosing to exercise their Warrants in connection with a redemption pursuant to this feature will, in effect, receive a number of Ordinary Shares for their Warrants based on an option pricing model with a fixed volatility input as of the of this prospectus. This redemption right provides Cellebrite with an additional mechanism by which to redeem all of the outstanding Warrants, and therefore have certainty as to our capital structure as the Warrants would no longer be outstanding and would have been exercised or redeemed. Cellebrite will be required to pay the applicable redemption price to warrant holders if Cellebrite chooses to exercise this redemption right and it will allow Cellebrite to quickly proceed with a redemption of the Warrants if Cellebrite determines it is in its best interest to do so. As such, Cellebrite would redeem the Warrants in this manner when Cellebrite believes it is in its best interest to update its capital structure to remove the Warrants and pay the redemption price to the warrant holders.

As stated above, Cellebrite can redeem the Warrants when the Ordinary Shares are trading at a price starting at $10.00 per share, which is below the exercise price of $11.50 per share, because it will provide certainty with respect to its capital structure and cash position while providing warrant holders with the opportunity to exercise their Warrants on a cashless basis for the applicable number of Ordinary Shares. If Cellebrite chooses to redeem the Warrants when the Ordinary Shares are trading at a price per share below the exercise price of the Warrants, this could result in the warrant holders receiving fewer Ordinary Shares than they would have received if they had chosen to wait to exercise their Warrants for Ordinary Shares if and when such Ordinary Shares were trading at a price higher than the exercise price of $11.50 per share.

No fractional Ordinary Shares will be issued upon exercise. If, upon exercise, a holder would be entitled to receive a fractional interest in a share, Cellebrite will round down to the nearest whole number of the number of Ordinary Shares to be issued to the holder.

Subject to applicable law, any action, proceeding or claim against Cellebrite arising out of or relating in any way to the Amended and Restated Warrant Agreement will be brought and enforced in the courts of the State of New York or the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, and Cellebrite irrevocably submits to such jurisdiction, which jurisdiction will be the exclusive forum for any such action, proceeding or claim. This provision applies to claims under the Securities Act but does not apply to claims under the Exchange Act or any claim for which the federal district courts of the United States of America are the sole and exclusive forum.

Redemption Procedures and Cashless Exercise

If Cellebrite calls the Warrants for redemption as described above, its management will have the option to require all holders that wish to exercise Warrants to do so on a cashless basis. In determining whether to require all holders to exercise their Warrants on a cashless basis, Cellebrite management will consider, among other factors, Cellebrite’s cash position, the number of Warrants that are outstanding and the dilutive effect on Cellebrite shareholders of issuing the maximum number of Ordinary Shares issuable upon the exercise of the Warrants. In such event, each holder would pay the exercise price by surrendering the Warrants for that number of Ordinary Shares equal to the quotient obtained by dividing (x) the product of the number of Ordinary Shares underlying the Warrants, multiplied by the excess of the “fair market value” (as defined below) over the exercise price of the Warrants by (y) the fair market value, which, for purposes of this paragraph, shall mean the average last reported sale price of the Ordinary Shares for the 10 trading days ending on the third trading day prior to the date on which the notice of redemption is sent to the holders of Warrants. If Cellebrite management takes advantage of this option, the notice of redemption will contain the information necessary to calculate the number of Ordinary Shares to be received upon exercise of the Warrants,

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including the fair market value in such case. Requiring a cashless exercise in this manner will reduce the number of Ordinary Shares to be issued and thereby lessen the dilutive effect of a warrant redemption. Cellebrite believes this feature is an attractive option to Cellebrite if it does not need the cash from the exercise of the Warrants after the Business Combination. If Cellebrite calls the Warrants for redemption and its management does not take advantage of this option, the Sponsor and its permitted transferees would still be entitled to exercise their Warrants for cash or on a cashless basis using the same formula described above that other warrant holders would have been required to use had all warrant holders been required to exercise their Warrants on a cashless basis.

A holder of a Warrant may notify Cellebrite in writing in the event it elects to be subject to a requirement that such holder will not have the right to exercise such Warrant, to the extent that after giving effect to such exercise, such person (together with such person’s affiliates), to the transfer agent’s actual knowledge, would beneficially own in excess of 9.8% (or such other amount as a holder may specify) of the Ordinary Shares outstanding immediately after giving effect to such exercise.

Anti-Dilution Adjustments

If the number of Ordinary Shares is increased by a stock dividend payable in Ordinary Shares, or by a split-up of Ordinary Shares or other similar event, then, on the effective date of such stock dividend, split-up or similar event, the number of Ordinary Shares issuable on exercise of each Warrant will be increased in proportion to such increase in the outstanding Ordinary Shares. A rights offering to holders of Ordinary Shares entitling holders to purchase Ordinary Shares at a price less than the fair market value will be deemed a stock dividend of a number of Ordinary Shares equal to the product of (1) the number of Ordinary Shares actually sold in such rights offering (or issuable under any other equity securities sold in such rights offering that are convertible into or exercisable for Ordinary Shares) multiplied by (2) one minus the quotient of (x) the price per share of Ordinary Shares paid in such rights offering divided by (y) the fair market value. For these purposes (1) if the rights offering is for securities convertible into or exercisable for Ordinary Shares, in determining the price payable for Ordinary Shares, there will be taken into account any consideration received for such rights, as well as any additional amount payable upon exercise or conversion and (2) fair market value means the volume weighted average price of Ordinary Shares as reported during the ten trading day period ending on the trading day prior to the first date on which the Ordinary Shares trade on the applicable exchange or in the applicable market, regular way, without the right to receive such rights.

In addition, if Cellebrite, at any time while the Warrants are outstanding and unexpired, pays a dividend or makes a distribution in cash, securities or other assets to the holders of Ordinary Shares on account of such Ordinary Shares (or other shares of our capital stock into which the Warrants are convertible), other than (a) as described above or (b) certain ordinary cash dividends, then the Warrant exercise price will be decreased, effective immediately after the effective date of such event, by the amount of cash and/or the fair market value of any securities or other assets paid on each Ordinary Share in respect of such event.

If the number of outstanding Ordinary Shares is decreased by a consolidation, combination, reverse stock split or reclassification of Ordinary Shares or other similar event, then, on the effective date of such consolidation, combination, reverse stock split, reclassification or similar event, the number of Ordinary Shares issuable on exercise of each Warrant will be decreased in proportion to such decrease in outstanding Ordinary Shares.

Whenever the number of Ordinary Shares purchasable upon the exercise of the Warrants is adjusted, as described above, the Warrant exercise price will be adjusted by multiplying the Warrant exercise price immediately prior to such adjustment by a fraction (x) the numerator of which will be the number of Ordinary Shares purchasable upon the exercise of the Warrants immediately prior to such adjustment, and (y) the denominator of which will be the number of Ordinary Shares so purchasable immediately thereafter.

In case of any reclassification or reorganization of the outstanding Ordinary Shares (other than those described above or that solely affects the par value of such Ordinary Shares), or in the case of any merger or consolidation of Cellebrite with or into another corporation (other than a consolidation or merger in which Cellebrite is the continuing corporation and that does not result in any reclassification or reorganization of the outstanding Ordinary Shares), or in the case of any sale or conveyance to another corporation or entity of the assets or other property of Cellebrite as an entirety or substantially as an entirety in connection with which Cellebrite is dissolved, the holders of the Warrants will thereafter have the right to purchase and receive, upon the basis and upon the terms and conditions specified in the Warrants and in lieu of the Ordinary Shares immediately theretofore purchasable and receivable upon the exercise of the rights represented thereby, the kind and amount of shares of stock or other securities or property (including

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cash) receivable upon such reclassification, reorganization, merger or consolidation, or upon a dissolution following any such sale or transfer, that the holder of the Warrants would have received if such holder had exercised their Warrants immediately prior to such event. However, if such holders were entitled to exercise a right of election as to the kind or amount of securities, cash or other assets receivable upon such consolidation or merger, then the kind and amount of securities, cash or other assets for which each Warrant will become exercisable will be deemed to be the weighted average of the kind and amount received per share by such holders in such consolidation or merger that affirmatively make such election, and if a tender, exchange or redemption offer has been made to and accepted by such holders (other than a tender, exchange or redemption offer made by Cellebrite in connection with redemption rights held by Cellebrite shareholders as provided for in Cellebrite’s Amended Articles) under circumstances in which, upon completion of such tender or exchange offer, the maker thereof, together with members of any group (within the meaning of Rule 13d-5(b)(1) under the Exchange Act) of which such maker is a part, and together with any affiliate or associate of such maker (within the meaning of Rule 12b-2 under the Exchange Act) and any members of any such group of which any such affiliate or associate is a part, own beneficially (within the meaning of Rule 13d-3 under the Exchange Act) more than 50% of the outstanding Ordinary Shares, the holder of a Warrant will be entitled to receive the highest amount of cash, securities or other property to which such holder would actually have been entitled as a shareholder if such warrant holder had exercised the Warrant prior to the expiration of such tender or exchange offer, accepted such offer and all of the Ordinary Shares held by such holder had been purchased pursuant to such tender or exchange offer, subject to adjustments (from and after the consummation of such tender or exchange offer) as nearly equivalent as possible to the adjustments provided for in the Amended and Restated Warrant Agreement. Additionally, if less than 70% of the consideration receivable by the holders of Ordinary Shares in such a transaction is payable in the form of common stock in the successor entity that is listed for trading on a national securities exchange or is quoted in an established over-the-counter market, or is to be so listed for trading or quoted immediately following such event, and if the registered holder of the Warrant properly exercises the Warrant within 30 days following public disclosure of such transaction, the Warrant exercise price will be reduced as specified in the Amended and Restated Warrant Agreement based on the per share consideration minus Black-Scholes Warrant Value (as defined in the Amended and Restated Warrant Agreement) of the warrant. The purpose of such exercise price reduction is to provide additional value to holders of the Warrants when an extraordinary transaction occurs during the exercise period of the Warrants pursuant to which the holders of the Warrants otherwise do not receive the full potential value of the Warrants in order to determine and realize the option value component of the Warrant. This formula is to compensate the warrant holder for the loss of the option value portion of the warrant due to the requirement that the warrant holder exercise the Warrant within 30 days of the event. Cellebrite believes that the Black-Scholes model is a commonly accepted pricing model for estimating fair market value where no quoted market price for an instrument is available.

The Warrants will be issued in registered form under the Amended and Restated Warrant Agreement. You should review a copy of the Amended and Restated Warrant Agreement, which was filed as an exhibit to Cellebrite’s registration statement on Form F-4, for a description of the terms and conditions applicable to the Warrants. The Amended and Restated Warrant Agreement provides that the terms of the Warrants may be amended without the consent of any holder to cure any ambiguity or correct any defective provision, but requires the approval by the holders of at least 50% of the then outstanding Warrants (not taking into account Warrants held by the Sponsor) to make any change that adversely affects the interests of the registered holders of Warrants.

The Warrants may be exercised upon surrender of the warrant certificate on or prior to the expiration date at the offices of the transfer agent, with the exercise form on the reverse side of the warrant certificate completed and executed as indicated, accompanied by full payment of the exercise price (or on a cashless basis, if applicable), by certified or official bank check payable to Cellebrite, for the number of Warrants being exercised. The warrant holders do not have the rights or privileges of holders of Ordinary Shares and any voting rights until they exercise their Warrant and receive Ordinary Shares. After the issuance of Ordinary Shares upon exercise of the Warrant, each holder will be entitled to one vote for each share held of record on all matters to be voted on by shareholders.

Private Placement Warrants

The private placement warrants (including the Ordinary Shares issuable upon exercise of such warrants) were not transferable, assignable or salable until 30 days after the completion of the Business Combination (except, among other limited exceptions, to Cellebrite officers and directors and other persons or entities affiliated with the Sponsors) and they are not redeemable by Cellebrite so long as they are held by the Sponsors, members of the Sponsors or their permitted transferees. The Sponsors or their permitted transferees, will have the option to exercise the private placement warrants on a cashless basis. Except as described below, the private placement warrants have terms and

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provisions that are identical to those of the Public Warrants. If the private placement warrants are held by holders other than the Sponsors or their permitted transferees, the private placement warrants will be redeemable by Cellebrite and exercisable by the holders on the same basis as the Public warrants.

If holders of the private placement warrants elect to exercise them on a cashless basis, they would pay the exercise price by surrendering his, her or its warrants for that number of Ordinary Shares equal to the quotient obtained by dividing (x) the product of the number of Ordinary Shares underlying the warrants, multiplied by the excess of the fair market value of Ordinary Shares over the exercise price of the warrants by (y) the fair market value. The “fair market value” shall mean the average reported closing price of the Ordinary Shares for the 10 trading days ending on the third trading day prior to the date on which the notice of warrant exercise is sent to the warrant agent.

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SELLING SECURITYHOLDERS

On August 30, 2021, we consummated the Business Combination.

The Selling Securityholders may offer and sell, from time to time, any or all of the Ordinary Shares or Warrants being offered for resale by this prospectus.

In addition, this prospectus relates to the offer and sale of up to 29,666,667 Ordinary Shares that, prior to the offering, were issuable by us upon the exercise of the Public Warrants.

The term “Selling Securityholders” includes the securityholders listed in the table below and their permitted transferees.

The table below provides information regarding the beneficial ownership of our Ordinary Shares and Warrants of each Selling Securityholder, the number of Ordinary Shares and number of Warrants that may be sold by each Selling Securityholder under this prospectus prior to the offering and that each Selling Securityholder will beneficially own after this offering. Beneficial ownership information is provided as of October 6, 2021, the date that the offering to which this prospectus relates commenced. We have based percentage ownership on 189,649,267 Ordinary Shares outstanding as of June 30, 2022.

Because each Selling Securityholder may dispose of all, none or some portion of their securities, no estimate can be given as to the number of securities that will be beneficially owned by a Selling Securityholder upon termination of this offering. For purposes of the table below, however, we have assumed that after termination of this offering none of the securities covered by this prospectus will be beneficially owned by the Selling Securityholder and further assumed that the Selling Securityholders will not acquire beneficial ownership of any additional securities during the offering. In addition, the Selling Securityholders may have sold, transferred or otherwise disposed of, or may sell, transfer or otherwise dispose of, at any time and from time to time, our securities in transactions exempt from the registration requirements of the Securities Act after the date on which the information in the table is presented.

 


Beneficially Owned
Prior to Offering

 

Ordinary Shares Number Registered for Sale Hereby

 


Beneficially Owned
After Offering

Name

 

Number

 

Percent

 

Number

 

Percent

TWC Tech Holdings II, LLC(1)

 

23,054,167

 

11.6

%

 

23,054,167

 

 

Lee Kirkpatrick(2)

 

25,000

 

*

 

 

25,000

 

 

Darren Thompson(3)

 

25,000

 

*

 

 

25,000

 

 

Scott Wagner(4)

 

25,000

 

*

 

 

25,000

 

 

Alexi A. Wellman(5)

 

25,000

 

*

 

 

25,000

 

 

SUNCORPORATION(6)

 

95,597,718

 

50.4

%

 

95,597,718

 

 

Israel Growth Partners(7)

 

32,631,492

 

17.2

%

 

32,631,492

 

 

Adam H. Clammer 2007 Long Term Trust(8)

 

375,000

 

*

 

 

375,000

 

 

Adam H. Clammer and Kathrine G. Harbin 2007 Joint Revocable Trust(9)

 

375,000

 

*

 

 

375,000

 

 

Alaris Master Fund, LP(10)

 

750,000

 

*

 

 

750,000

 

 

Axon Enterprise, Inc.(11)

 

9,000,000

 

4.7

%

 

9,000,000

 

 

Crescent Park FOF Partners, L.P.(12)

 

62,882

 

*

 

 

62,882

 

 

Crescent Park Global Equity Master Fund, L.P.(13)

 

94,634

 

*

 

 

94,634

 

 

Crescent Park Master Fund, L.P.(14)

 

810,484

 

*

 

 

810,484

 

 

Crescent Park SPV I, L.P.(15)

 

32,000

 

*

 

 

32,000

 

 

Crosslink Crossover Fund VII, LP(16)

 

250,000

 

*

 

 

250,000

 

 

Crosslink Crossover Fund VIII, LP(17)

 

769,000

 

*

 

 

769,000

 

 

Crosslink Crossover Fund VIII-B, LP(18)

 

155,000

 

*

 

 

155,000

 

 

Crosslink Emerging Growth Fund, LP(19)

 

403,000

 

*

 

 

403,000

 

 

Delta Growth Fund, LP(20)

 

423,000

 

*

 

 

423,000

 

 

Greene Investment Partners LLC(21)

 

750,000

 

*

 

 

750,000

 

 

Isomer Master Fund LP(22)

 

4,000,000

 

2.1

%

 

4,000,000

 

 

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Beneficially Owned
Prior to Offering

 

Ordinary Shares Number Registered for Sale Hereby

 


Beneficially Owned
After Offering

Name

 

Number

 

Percent

 

Number

 

Percent

Light Street Halo, L.P.(23)

 

82,584

 

*

 

 

82,584

 

 

 

Light Street Mercury Master Fund, L.P.(24)

 

6,345,000

 

3.3

%

 

4,050,000

 

2,295,000

 

1.2

%

Light Street Tungsten Master Fund, L.P.(25)

 

367,416

 

*

 

 

367,416

 

 

 

Makena Developed Markets Master Fund B, L.P.(26)

 

2,500,000

 

1.3

%

 

2,500,000

 

 

 

Migdal Sal-Domestic Equities(27)

 

1,400,000

 

*

 

 

1,400,000

 

 

 

Park West Investors Master Fund, Limited (28)

 

2,504,000

 

1.3

%

 

2,504,000

 

 

 

Park West Partners International, Limited (29)

 

246,000

 

*

 

 

246,000

 

 

 

Phoenix Insurance Company Ltd. (Nostro) (30)

 

75,000

 

*

 

 

75,000

 

 

 

Shotfut Menayot Chool – Phoenix Amitim (Phoenix Insurance Company Ltd.)(31)

 

425,000

 

*

 

 

425,000

 

 

 

Tomahawk Investments, LLC(32)

 

100,000

 

*

 

 

100,000

 

 

 

____________

*        Less than 1.0%.

(1)     Reflects the forfeiture of 1,500,000 Ordinary Shares pursuant to the terms of the Letter Agreement and 9,666,667 Ordinary Shares underlying the Warrants owned by TWC Tech Holdings II, LLC. The address of TWC Tech Holdings II, LLC is c/o True Wind Capital, Four Embarcadero Center, Suite 2100, San Francisco, CA 94111. TWC SPAC Aggregator II, LLC is the managing member of TWC Tech Holdings II, LLC. TWC Employee SPAC Aggregator II, LLC is the managing member of TWC SPAC Aggregator II, LLC. True Wind Capital Management, L.P. is the managing member of TWC Employee SPAC Aggregator II, LLC. True Wind Capital Management GP, LLC is the general partner of True Wind Capital Management, L.P. As the managing members of True Wind Capital Management GP, LLC, Mr. Greene and Mr. Clammer may be deemed to have or share beneficial ownership of the securities held directly by TWC Tech Holdings II, LLC.

(2)     The address of Lee Kirkpatrick is c/o True Wind Capital, Four Embarcadero Center, Suite 2100, San Francisco, CA 94111.

(3)     The address of Darren Thompson is c/o True Wind Capital, Four Embarcadero Center, Suite 2100, San Francisco, CA 94111.

(4)      The address of Scott Wagner is c/o True Wind Capital, Four Embarcadero Center, Suite 2100, San Francisco, CA 94111.

(5)     The address of Alexi A. Wellman is c/o True Wind Capital, Four Embarcadero Center, Suite 2100, San Francisco, CA 94111.

(6)      SUNCORPORATION is a publicly traded company on the Tokyo Stock Exchange. Its address is 250 Asahi, Kochino-Cho, Konan-City, Aichi-Prefecture 483-8555, Japan. The board of directors of SUNCORPORATION has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported. SUNCORPORATION has been a parent company of the Company. The Company has been a supplier of SUNCORPORATION’s mobile solutions business.

(7)      Haim Shani is a Co-Founder and general partner of Israel Growth Partners. As such, he may be deemed to have or share beneficial ownership of the shares held by Israel Growth Partners. Mr. Shani disclaims any beneficial ownership of the reported shares other than to the extent of any pecuniary interest he may have therein, directly or indirectly. The address of Israel Growth Partners is Hakfar Hayarok, Precede Building, Ramat Hasharon, Israel 4780.

(8)      The address of Adam H. Clammer 2007 Long Term Trust is 155 Bovet Road, Suite 770, San Mateo, California 94402. Benjamin Clammer, the Trustee of Adam H. Clammer 2007 Long Term Trust, has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(9)      The address of Adam H. Clammer and Kathrine G. Harbin 2007 Joint Revocable Trust is 155 Bovet Road, Suite 770, San Mateo, California 94402. Adam H. Clammer and Kathrine G. Harbin, the Trustees of Adam H. Clammer and Kathrine G. Harbin 2007 Joint Revocable Trust, have the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(10)    The address of Alaris Master Fund, LP is 4900 Main Street, Suite 600, Kansas City, Missouri 64112. Marilyn B. Hebenstreit, James B. Hebenstreit, Alison Armistead, Michael J. Koeppen, and Hunter Armistead are the officers of Pembroke Investments LLC, the Manager of Alaris Master Fund, LP’s General Partner, Alaris Capital, LLC, and have the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(11)    The address of Axon Enterprise, Inc. is 17800 North 85th Street, Scottsdale, AZ 85255. The board of directors of Axon Enterprise, Inc. has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(12)    The address of Crescent Park FOF Partners, L.P. is 1900 University Avenue, Suite 501, East Palo Alto, California 94303. Eli Cohen is the Portfolio Manager of Crescent Park FOF Partners, L.P.’s Investment Advisor, Crescent Park Management, L.P., and has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

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(13)    The address of Crescent Park Global Equity Master Fund, L.P. is 1900 University Avenue, Suite 501, East Palo Alto, California 94303. Eli Cohen is the Portfolio Manager of Crescent Park Global Equity Master Fund, L.P.’s Investment Advisor, Crescent Park Management, L.P., and has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(14)    The address of Crescent Park Master Fund, L.P. is 1900 University Avenue, Suite 501, East Palo Alto, California 94303. Eli Cohen is the Portfolio Manager of Crescent Park Master Fund, L.P.’s Investment Advisor, Crescent Park Management, L.P., and has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(15)    The address of Crescent Park SPV I, L.P. is 1900 University Avenue, Suite 501, East Palo Alto, California 94303. Eli Cohen is the Portfolio Manager of Crescent Park SPV I, L.P.’s Investment Advisor, Crescent Park Management, L.P., and has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(16)    The address of Crosslink Crossover Fund VII, LP is 2180 Sand Hill Road, Suite 200, Menlo Park, California 94025. Mihaly Szigeti has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(17)    The address of Crosslink Crossover Fund VIII, LP is 2180 Sand Hill Road, Suite 200, Menlo Park, California 94025. Mihaly Szigeti has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(18)    The address of Crosslink Crossover Fund VIII-B, LP is 2180 Sand Hill Road, Suite 200, Menlo Park, California 94025. Mihaly Szigeti has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(19)    The address of Crosslink Emerging Growth Fund, LP is 2180 Sand Hill Road, Suite 200, Menlo Park, California 94025. Mihaly Szigeti has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(20)    The address of Delta Growth Fund, LP is 2180 Sand Hill Road, Suite 200, Menlo Park, California 94025. Mihaly Szigeti has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(21)    The address of Greene Investment Partners LLC is 155 Bovet Road, Suite 770, San Mateo, California 94402. James H. Greene, Jr. is the Manager of Greene Investment Partners LLC.

(22)    The address of Isomer Master Fund LP is 420 Lexington Avenue, Suite 2007, New York, New York 10170. Mendel Hui is a Managing Member of Isomer Master Fund LP’s General Partner, Isomer Partners Fund GP LLC, and has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(23)    The address of Light Street Halo, L.P. is 525 University Avenue, Suite 300, Palo Alto, California 94301. Glen Kacher is the Manager of Light Street Halo, L.P.’s General Partner, Light Street Capital Management, LLC, and has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(24)    The address of Light Street Mercury Master Fund, L.P. is 525 University Avenue, Suite 300, Palo Alto, California 94301. Glen Kacher is the Manager of Light Street Mercury Master Fund, L.P.’s General Partner, Light Street Capital Management, LLC, and has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(25)    The address of Light Street Tungsten Master Fund, L.P. is 525 University Avenue, Suite 300, Palo Alto, California 94301. Glen Kacher is the Manager of Light Street Tungsten Master Fund, L.P.’s General Partner, Light Street Capital Management, LLC, and has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(26)    The address of Makena Developed Markets Master Fund B, L.P. is 2755 Sand Hill Road, Suite 200, Menlo Park, California 94025. Mike Tremmel is the Chief Financial Officer of Makena Capital Management, LLC, which indirectly controls Makena Developed Markets Master Fund B, L.P., and has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(27)    The address of Migdal Sal-Domestic Equities is 4 Efal Street, Petach-Tikva, Israel, 4951104. Migdal Sal-Domestic Equities disclaims beneficial ownership of the securities reported. Tsahi Zanzuri and Noam Boas are employees of Migdal Sal-Domestic Equities and have the power to vote on and dispose of the securities reported, respectively.

(28)    The address of Park West Investors Master Fund, Limited is c/o Park West Asset Management LLC, 900 Larkspur Landing Circle, Suite 165, Larkspur, California 94939. Peter S. Park, through one or more affiliated entities, is the controlling manager of Park West Investors Master Fund, Limited’s Investment Manager, Park West Asset Management LLC, and has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(29)    The address of Park West Partners International, Limited is c/o Park West Asset Management LLC, 900 Larkspur Landing Circle, Suite 165, Larkspur, California 94939. Peter S. Park, through one or more affiliated entities, is the controlling manager of Park West Partners International, Limited’s Investment Manager, Park West Asset Management LLC, and has the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(30)    The address of Phoenix Insurance Company Ltd. (Nostro) is Derech HaShalom 53, Givatayim, Israel, 5345433. Haggai Schreiber, the Deputy Chief Executive Officer and Chief Investment Officer of Phoenix Insurance Company Ltd., and Dan Kerner, the Head of Nostro, have the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(31)    The address of Shotfut Menayot Chul — Phoenix Amitim (Phoenix Insurance Company Ltd.) is Derech HaShalom 53, Givatayim, Israel, 5345433. Haggai Schreiber, the Deputy Chief Executive Officer and Chief Investment Officer of Shotfut Menayot Chul — Phoenix Amitim (Phoenix Insurance Company Ltd.), and Gilad Shamir, the Chief Investment Officer of Amitim, have the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

(32)    The address of Tomahawk Investments, LLC is 4900 Main Street, Suite 600, Kansas City, Missouri 64112. Michael J. Koeppen, the Co-Manager of Tomahawk Investments, LLC, Benjamin C. Armistead, and Tara C. Armistead have the power to vote or dispose of the securities reported.

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Material Relationships with the Selling Securityholders

The Selling Securityholders include certain of our directors, major shareholders and their affiliates. For a description of our material relationships with such Selling Securityholders and their affiliates, see the sections of our annual report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2021 filed with the SEC, titled “Item 6. Directors, Senior Management and Employees” and “Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions” incorporated by reference herein.

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CERTAIN MATERIAL U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS

The following discussion summarizes the material U.S. federal income tax considerations to U.S. Holders and Non-U.S. Holders (as defined below) of the ownership and disposition of Ordinary Shares and Warrants. This discussion applies only to the Ordinary Shares and Warrants, as the case may be, that are held as “capital assets” within the meaning of Section 1221 of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”) (generally, property held for investment).

The following does not purport to be a complete analysis of all potential tax effects arising in connection with the ownership and disposition of Ordinary Shares and Warrants. The effects of other U.S. federal tax laws, such as estate and gift tax laws, and any applicable state, local, or non-U.S. tax laws are not discussed. This discussion is based on the Code, Treasury regulations promulgated thereunder, judicial decisions, and published rulings and administrative pronouncements of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”), in each case in effect as of the date hereof. These authorities may change or be subject to differing interpretations. Any such change or differing interpretation may be applied retroactively in a manner that could adversely affect the tax consequences discussed below. Cellebrite has not sought and will not seek any rulings from the IRS regarding the matters discussed below. There can be no assurance the IRS will not take or a court will not sustain a contrary position regarding the tax consequences discussed below.

This discussion does not address all U.S. federal income tax consequences relevant to a holder’s particular circumstances, including the impact of the Medicare contribution tax on net investment income and the alternative minimum tax. In addition, it does not address consequences relevant to holders subject to special rules, including, without limitation:

        banks, insurance companies, and certain other financial institutions;

        regulated investment companies and real estate investment trusts;

        brokers, dealers, or traders in securities;

        traders in securities that elect to mark to market;

        tax-exempt organizations or governmental organizations;

        U.S. expatriates and former citizens or long-term residents of the U.S.;

        persons holding Ordinary Shares and/or Warrants, as the case may be, as part of a hedge, straddle, constructive sale, or other risk reduction strategy or as part of a conversion transaction or other integrated or similar transaction;

        persons subject to special tax accounting rules as a result of any item of gross income with respect to Ordinary Shares and/or Warrants, as the case may be, being taken into account in an applicable financial statement;

        persons that actually or constructively own 5% or more (by vote or value) of the outstanding Ordinary Shares;

        founders, sponsors, officers or directors of TWC;

        “controlled foreign corporations,” “passive foreign investment companies,” and corporations that accumulate earnings to avoid U.S. federal income tax (and their shareholders);

        S corporations, partnerships, or other entities or arrangements treated as partnerships or other flow-through entities for U.S. federal income tax purposes (and investors therein);

        U.S. Holders having a functional currency other than the U.S. dollar;

        persons who hold or received Ordinary Shares and/or Warrants, as the case may be, pursuant to the exercise of any employee stock option or otherwise as compensation; and

        tax-qualified retirement plans.

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If an entity or arrangement treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes holds Ordinary Shares and/or Warrants, the tax treatment of an owner of such entity will depend on the status of the owner or participant in the arrangement, the activities of the entity or arrangement, and certain determinations made at the owner or participant level. Accordingly, entities or arrangements treated as partnerships for U.S. federal income tax purposes and the partners in such partnerships should consult their tax advisors regarding the U.S. federal income tax consequences to them.

For purposes of this discussion, a “U.S. Holder” is any beneficial owner of Ordinary Shares and/or Warrants, as the case may be, that is for U.S. federal income tax purposes:

        an individual who is a citizen or resident of the U.S.;

        a corporation (or other entity taxable as a corporation) created or organized in, or under the laws of, the U.S., any state thereof, or the District of Columbia;

        an estate, the income of which is subject to U.S. federal income tax regardless of its source; or

        a trust that (1) is subject to the primary supervision of a U.S. court and the control of one or more “United States persons” (within the meaning of Section 7701(a)(30) of the Code) or (2) has a valid election in effect to be treated as a United States person for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

THE U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX TREATMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP AND DISPOSITION OF ORDINARY SHARES AND/OR WARRANTS TO ANY PARTICULAR HOLDER WILL DEPEND ON THE HOLDER’S PARTICULAR TAX CIRCUMSTANCES. YOU ARE URGED TO CONSULT YOUR TAX ADVISOR REGARDING THE U.S. FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL, AND NON-U.S. INCOME AND OTHER TAX CONSEQUENCES TO YOU, IN LIGHT OF YOUR PARTICULAR INVESTMENT OR TAX CIRCUMSTANCES, OF THE OWNERSHIP AND DISPOSITION OF ORDINARY SHARES AND/OR WARRANTS.

U.S. Federal Income Tax Treatment of Cellebrite

Tax Residence of Cellebrite for U.S. Federal Income Tax Purposes

Although Cellebrite is incorporated and tax resident in Israel, the IRS may assert that it should be treated as a U.S. corporation (and therefore a U.S. tax resident) for U.S. federal income tax purposes pursuant to Section 7874 of the Code. For U.S. federal income tax purposes, a corporation is generally considered a U.S. “domestic” corporation (or U.S. tax resident) if it is created or organized in or under the laws of the United States, any state thereof, or the District of Columbia and a corporation is generally considered a “foreign” corporation (or non-U.S. tax resident) if it is not a U.S. corporation. Because Cellebrite is an entity incorporated and tax resident in Israel, it would generally be classified as a foreign corporation (or non-U.S. tax resident) under these rules. Section 7874 of the Code provides an exception under which a foreign incorporated and foreign tax resident entity may, in certain circumstances, be treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes. The Section 7874 rules are complex and require analysis of all relevant facts, and there is limited guidance and significant uncertainties as to their application.

Under Section 7874, a corporation created or organized outside the United States (i.e., a foreign corporation) will nevertheless be treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes when (i) the foreign corporation directly or indirectly acquires substantially all of the assets held directly or indirectly by a U.S. corporation (including the indirect acquisition of assets of the U.S. corporation by acquiring the outstanding shares of the U.S. corporation), (ii) the shareholders of the acquired U.S. corporation hold, by vote or value, at least 80% (or 60% if the Third Country Rule, as defined herein, applies) of the shares of the foreign acquiring corporation after the acquisition by reason of holding shares in the U.S. acquired corporation (the “Section 7874 Percentage”), and (iii) the foreign corporation’s “expanded affiliated group” does not have substantial business activities in the foreign corporation’s country of tax residency relative to such expanded affiliated group’s worldwide activities (the “Substantial Business Activities Exception”). In order to satisfy the Substantial Business Activities Exception, at least 25% of the employees (by headcount and compensation), real and tangible assets and gross income of the foreign acquiring corporation’s “expanded affiliated group” must be based, incurred, located and derived, respectively, in the country in which the foreign acquiring corporation is a tax resident after the acquisition. The Treasury regulations promulgated under Section 7874 (the “Section 7874 Regulations”) generally also provide that if (i) there is an acquisition of substantially all of the assets held directly or indirectly by a U.S. corporation

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after which the shareholders of the acquired U.S. corporation hold, by vote or value, at least 60% of the shares of the foreign acquiring corporation by reason of holding shares in the U.S. acquired corporation, and (ii) in a related acquisition, such foreign acquiring corporation acquires another foreign corporation exceeding a certain threshold value, and the foreign acquiring corporation is not tax resident in the foreign country in which the acquired foreign corporation was tax resident prior to the transactions, then the foreign acquiring corporation will be treated as a domestic corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes (the “Third Country Rule”). The Section 7874 Regulations further provide for a number of special rules that aggregate multiple acquisitions of U.S. corporations for purposes of Section 7874 that are conducted as part of a plan or conducted over a 36-month period. Moreover, certain acquisitions of U.S. corporations over a 36-month period will impact the Section 7874 Percentage, making it more likely that Section 7874 will apply to a foreign acquiring corporation.

Cellebrite indirectly acquired substantially all of the assets of TWC through the Merger. Cellebrite do not expect the Third Country Rule to be applicable to the Merger. As a result, Section 7874 of the Code may apply to cause Cellebrite to be treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes following the Merger depending on whether the Section 7874 Percentage equals or exceeds 80%, subject to the applicability of the Substantial Business Activities Exception.

Based upon the terms of the Merger and the rules for determining share ownership under Section 7874 and the Section 7874 Regulations, Cellebrite expects that the Section 7874 Percentage of TWC stockholders in Cellebrite should be less than 80% after the Merger. Accordingly, Cellebrite is not expected to be treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Section 7874 of the Code. The calculation of the Section 7874 Percentage is complex, is subject to detailed regulations (the application of which is uncertain in various respects and could be impacted by changes in such U.S. tax laws with possible retroactive effect) and is subject to certain factual uncertainties. Moreover, former holders of TWC securities may be deemed to own an amount of Ordinary Shares in respect to certain redemptions by TWC of TWC common stock prior to the Merger for purposes of determining the ownership percentage of former holders of TWC securities under Section 7874 of the Code. Accordingly, the status of Cellebrite as a foreign corporation is inherently uncertain and there can be no assurance that the IRS will not challenge the status of Cellebrite as a foreign corporation under Section 7874 or that such challenge would not be sustained by a court.

If the IRS were to successfully challenge under Section 7874 Cellebrite’s status as a foreign corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, Cellebrite and certain Cellebrite shareholders would be subject to significant adverse tax consequences, including a higher effective corporate income tax rate on Cellebrite and future withholding taxes on certain Cellebrite shareholders, depending on the application of any income tax treaty that might apply to reduce such withholding taxes, and holders of Ordinary Shares and/or Warrants would be treated as holders of stock and warrants of a U.S. corporation.

However, even if the Section 7874 Percentage was such that Cellebrite were still respected as a foreign corporation under Section 7874, Cellebrite may be limited in using its equity to engage in future acquisitions of U.S. corporations over a 36-month period following the Merger. If Cellebrite were to be treated as acquiring substantially all of the assets of a U.S. corporation within a 36-month period after the Merger, the Section 7874 Regulations would exclude certain shares of Cellebrite attributable to the Merger for purposes of determining the Section 7874 Percentage of that subsequent acquisition, making it more likely that Section 7874 would apply to such subsequent acquisition.

The remainder of this discussion assumes that Cellebrite will not be treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Section 7874 of the Code.

Utilization of TWC’s Tax Attributes and Certain Other Adverse Tax Consequences to Cellebrite and Cellebrite’s Shareholders.

Following the acquisition of a U.S. corporation by a foreign corporation, Section 7874 can limit the ability of the acquired U.S. corporation and its U.S. affiliates to use U.S. tax attributes (including net operating losses and certain tax credits) to offset U.S. taxable income resulting from certain transactions, as well as result in certain other adverse tax consequences, even if the acquiring foreign corporation is respected as a foreign corporation for purposes of Section 7874. Specifically, Section 7874 can apply in this manner if (i) the foreign corporation acquires, directly or indirectly, substantially all of the properties held directly or indirectly by a U.S. corporation, (ii) after the acquisition, the former shareholders of the acquired U.S. corporation hold at least 60% (by either vote or value) but less than 80% (by vote and value) of the shares of the foreign acquiring corporation by reason of holding shares in the acquired U.S. corporation, (iii) the Third Country Rule does not apply, and (iv) the foreign corporation’s “expanded affiliated group” does not meet the Substantial Business Activities Exception.

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Based upon the terms of the Merger and the rules for determining share ownership under Section 7874 and the Section 7874 Regulations, Cellebrite expects that the Section 7874 Percentage should be less than 60% after the Merger. Accordingly, the limitations and other rules described above are not expected to apply to Cellebrite or TWC after the Merger.

If the Section 7874 Percentage applicable to the Merger is at least 60% but less than 80% and the Third Country Rule does not apply (as expected), Cellebrite and certain of Cellebrite’s shareholders may be subject to adverse tax consequences including, but not limited to, restrictions on the use of tax attributes with respect to “inversion gain” recognized over a 10-year period following the transaction, disqualification of dividends paid from preferential “qualified dividend income” rates and the requirement that any U.S. corporation owned by Cellebrite include as “base erosion payments” that may be subject to a minimum U.S. federal income tax any amounts treated as reductions in gross income paid to certain related foreign persons. Furthermore, certain “disqualified individuals” (including officers and directors of a U.S. corporation) may be subject to an excise tax on certain stock-based compensation held thereby at a rate of 20%. However, as a blank check company whose assets are primarily comprised of cash and cash equivalents, it is not expected that TWC will have a significant amount of inversion gain as a result of the Merger. Moreover, if it is determined that the Section 7874 Percentage is at least 60% and that Cellebrite is tax resident in a jurisdiction other than Israel, the Third Country Rule would apply and Cellebrite would be treated as a U.S. corporation under Section 7874 of the Code in the same manner as described above under “ Tax Residence of Cellebrite for U.S. Federal Income Tax Purposes.”

The above determination, however, is subject to detailed regulations (the application of which is uncertain in various respects and could be impacted by future changes in such U.S. Treasury regulations, with possible retroactive effect) and is subject to certain factual uncertainties. In addition, changes to the rules in Section 7874 or Section 7874 Regulations, or other changes in law, could adversely affect the above determination for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Therefore, the application of Section 7874 is inherently uncertain. There can be no assurance that the IRS will not challenge whether Cellebrite is subject to the above rules or that such a challenge would not be sustained by a court. If the IRS successfully applied these rules to Cellebrite, significant adverse tax consequences would result for Cellebrite and for certain Cellebrite shareholders, including a higher effective corporate tax rate on Cellebrite.

U.S. Holders

U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Ownership and Disposition of Ordinary Shares and Warrants to U.S. Holders

Distributions on Ordinary Shares

If Cellebrite makes distributions of cash or property on the Ordinary Shares, such distributions will be treated first as a dividend to the extent of Cellebrite’s current and accumulated earnings and profits (as determined for U.S. federal income tax purposes), and then as a tax-free return of capital to the extent of the U.S. Holder’s tax basis, with any excess treated as capital gain from the sale or exchange of the shares. The amount of any such distribution will include any amounts withheld by Cellebrite (or another applicable withholding agent). If Cellebrite does not provide calculations of its earnings and profits under U.S. federal income tax principles, all cash distributions may be reported as dividends for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Any dividend will not be eligible for the dividends received deduction allowed to corporations in respect of dividends received from U.S. corporations.

Subject to the discussions above under “— Utilization of TWC’s Tax Attributes and Certain Other Adverse Tax Consequences to Cellebrite and Cellebrite’s Shareholders” and below under “— Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules,” dividends received by certain non-corporate U.S. Holders (including individuals) may be “qualified dividend income,” which is taxed at the lower applicable capital gains rate, provided that:

        either (a) the shares are readily tradable on an established securities market in the United States, or (b) Cellebrite is eligible for the benefits of a qualifying income tax treaty with the United States that includes an exchange of information program;

        Cellebrite is neither a PFIC (as discussed below under below under “— Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules”) nor treated as such with respect to the U.S. Holder for Cellebrite’s taxable year in which the dividend is paid or the preceding taxable year;

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        the U.S. Holder satisfies certain holding period requirements;

        the U.S. Holder is not under an obligation to make related payments with respect to positions in substantially similar or related property; and

        the taxpayer does not take the dividends into account as investment income under Code Section 163(d)(4)(B).

There can be no assurances that Cellebrite will be eligible for benefits of an applicable comprehensive income tax treaty between the United States and Israel. In addition, there also can be no assurance that Ordinary Shares will be considered “readily tradable” on an established securities market in accordance with applicable legal authorities. Furthermore, Cellebrite will not constitute a qualified foreign corporation for purposes of these rules if it is a PFIC for the taxable year in which it pays a dividend or for the preceding taxable year. See “— Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules.” U.S. Holders should consult their tax advisors regarding the availability of the lower rate for dividends paid with respect to Ordinary Shares.

The amount of any dividend distribution paid in foreign currency will be the U.S. dollar amount calculated by reference to the applicable exchange rate in effect on the date of actual or constructive receipt, regardless of whether the payment is in fact converted into U.S. dollars at that time. A U.S. Holder may have foreign currency gain or loss if the dividend is converted into U.S. dollars after the date of receipt.

Foreign withholding tax (if any) paid on dividends on Ordinary Shares at the rate applicable to a U.S. Holder (taking into account any applicable income tax treaty) may, subject to limitations and conditions, be treated as foreign income tax eligible for credit against such U.S. Holder’s United States federal income tax liability. In lieu of claiming a foreign tax credit, a U.S. Holder may, in certain circumstances, deduct foreign taxes in computing their taxable income, subject to generally applicable limitations under U.S. law. Generally, an election to deduct foreign taxes instead of claiming foreign tax credits applies to all foreign taxes paid or accrued in the taxable year. If a refund of the tax withheld is available under the laws of the state of Israel or under the applicable income tax treaty, the amount of tax withheld that is refundable will not be eligible for such credit against a U.S. Holder’s U.S. federal income tax liability (and will not be eligible for the deduction against U.S. federal taxable income). Subject to certain exceptions, dividends on Ordinary Shares will constitute foreign source income for foreign tax credit limitation purposes. Subject to certain exceptions, dividends on Ordinary Shares will constitute foreign source income for foreign tax credit limitation purposes. If the dividends are qualified dividend income (as discussed above), the amount of the dividend taken into account for purposes of calculating the foreign tax credit limitation will be limited to the gross amount of the dividend, multiplied by a fraction, the numerator of which is the reduced rate applicable to qualified dividend income and the denominator of which is the highest rate of tax normally applicable to dividends. The limitation on foreign taxes eligible for credit is calculated separately with respect to specific classes of income. For this purpose, dividends distributed by Cellebrite with respect to the Ordinary Shares generally will constitute “passive category income” but could, in the case of certain U.S. Holders, constitute “general category income.” The rules governing foreign tax credits are complex and U.S. Holders are urged to consult their tax advisers regarding the creditability of foreign taxes in their particular circumstances.

Sale, Exchange, Redemption or Other Taxable Disposition of Ordinary Shares and Warrants

Subject to the discussion below under “— Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules,” a U.S. Holder generally will recognize gain or loss on any sale, exchange, redemption or other taxable disposition of Ordinary Shares or Warrants in an amount equal to the difference between (i) the amount realized on the disposition and (ii) such a U.S. Holder’s initial tax basis in shares generally will equal the cost of such shares. Any gain or loss recognized by a U.S. Holder on a taxable disposition of Ordinary Shares or Warrants generally will be capital gain or loss. A non-corporate U.S. Holder, including an individual, who has held the Ordinary Shares and/or Warrants for more than one year generally will be eligible for reduced tax rates for such long-term capital gains. The deductibility of capital losses is subject to limitations.

Any such gain or loss recognized generally will be treated as U.S. source income or loss. Accordingly, in the event any Israeli tax (including withholding tax) is imposed upon such sale or other disposition, a U.S. Holder may not be able to utilize foreign tax credits unless such holder has foreign source income or gain in the same category from other sources. Moreover, there are special rules under the income tax treaty between the United States and Israel (the “Treaty”), which may impact a U.S. Holder’s ability to claim a foreign tax credit. U.S. Holders are urged to consult their tax advisor regarding the ability to claim a foreign tax credit and the application of the Treaty to such U.S. Holder’s particular circumstances.

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This discussion assumes that any consideration received (or deemed received) by a holder in consideration for the sale or other taxable disposition of our Ordinary Shares or Warrants will be in U.S. dollars.

Exercise, Lapse or Redemption of a Warrant

Subject to the PFIC rules discussed below, a U.S. Holder generally will not recognize gain or loss upon the acquisition of an Ordinary Share on the exercise of a Warrant for cash. A U.S. Holder’s tax basis in Ordinary Shares received upon exercise of the Warrant generally should be an amount equal to the sum of U.S. Holder’s initial investment in the Warrant (or, with respect to Warrants received in the Merger, the U.S. Holder’s tax basis in the TWC Warrant exchanged therefor (assuming the Merger is not a taxable transaction under Sections 368(a) or 367(a) of the Code)) and the exercise price. The U.S. Holder’s holding period for an Ordinary Share received upon exercise of the Warrant will begin on the date following the date of exercise (or possibly the date of exercise) of the Warrant and will not include the period during which the U.S. Holder held the Warrant. If a Warrant is allowed to lapse unexercised, a U.S. Holder generally will recognize a capital loss equal to such holder’s tax basis in the Warrant.

The tax consequences of a cashless exercise of a Warrant are not clear under current tax law. Subject to the PFIC rules discussed below, a cashless exercise may be tax-deferred, either because the exercise is not a gain realization event or because the exercise is treated as a recapitalization for U.S. federal income tax purposes. In either tax-deferred situation, a U.S. Holder’s basis in the Ordinary Shares received generally would equal the U.S. Holder’s basis in the Warrants exercised therefor. If the cashless exercise is not treated as a gain realization event, a U.S. Holder’s holding period in the Ordinary Shares would be treated as commencing on the date following the date of exercise (or possibly the date of exercise) of the Warrants and will not include the period during which the U.S. Holder held the Warrants. If the cashless exercise were treated as a recapitalization, the holding period of the Ordinary Shares would include the holding period of the Warrants exercised therefor.

It is also possible that a cashless exercise of a Warrant could be treated in part as a taxable exchange in which gain or loss would be recognized in the manner set forth above under “— Sale, Exchange, Redemption or Other Taxable Disposition of Ordinary Shares and Warrants.” In such event, a U.S. Holder could be deemed to have surrendered warrants equal to the number of Ordinary Shares having an aggregate fair market value equal to the exercise price for the total number of warrants to be exercised. Subject to the PFIC rules discussed below, the U.S. Holder would recognize capital gain or loss with respect to the Warrants deemed surrendered in an amount generally equal to the difference between (i) the fair market value of the Ordinary Shares that would have been received in a regular exercise of the Warrants deemed surrendered and (ii) the U.S. Holder’s tax basis in such Warrants deemed surrendered. In this case, a U.S. Holder’s aggregate tax basis in the Ordinary Shares received would equal the sum of (i) U.S. Holder’s tax basis in the Warrants deemed exercised and (ii) the aggregate exercise price of such Warrants. A U.S. Holder’s holding period for the Ordinary Shares received in such case generally would commence on the date following the date of exercise (or possibly the date of exercise) of the Warrants and will not include the period during which the U.S. Holder held the Warrants.

Due to the absence of authority on the U.S. federal income tax treatment of a cashless exercise of Warrants, including when a U.S. Holder’s holding period would commence with respect to the Ordinary Share received, there can be no assurance regarding which, if any, of the alternative tax consequences and holding periods described above would be adopted by the IRS or a court of law. Accordingly, U.S. Holders should consult their tax advisors regarding the tax consequences of a cashless exercise of Warrants.

Subject to the PFIC rules described below, if Cellebrite redeems Warrants for cash pursuant to the redemption provisions described in the section of this registration statement entitled “— Description of Warrants — Public Warrants” or if Cellebrite purchases Warrants in an open market transaction, such redemption or purchase generally will be treated as a taxable disposition to the U.S. Holder, taxed as described above under “— Sale, Exchange, Redemption or Other Taxable Disposition of Ordinary Shares and Warrants.”

Possible Constructive Distributions

The terms of each Warrant provide for an adjustment to the number of Ordinary Shares for which the Warrant may be exercised or to the exercise price of the Warrant in certain events, as discussed in the section of this registration statement captioned “Description of Warrants.” An adjustment which has the effect of preventing dilution generally is not taxable. A U.S. Holder of a Warrant would, however, be treated as receiving a constructive distribution from Cellebrite if, for example, the adjustment increases the holder’s proportionate interest in Cellebrite’s assets or earnings

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and profits (for instance, through an increase in the number of Ordinary Shares that would be obtained upon exercise of such warrant) as a result of a distribution of cash or other property such as other securities to the holders of the Ordinary Shares which is taxable to the U.S. Holders of such shares as described under “— Distributions on Ordinary Shares” above. Such constructive distribution would be subject to tax as described under that section in the same manner as if the U.S. Holder of such Warrant received a cash distribution equal to the fair market value of such increased interest.

Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules

The treatment of U.S. Holders of the Ordinary Shares and Warrants could be materially different from that described above, if Cellebrite is treated as a “passive foreign investment company,” or PFIC, for U.S. federal income tax purposes. A non-U.S. entity treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes generally will be a PFIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes for any taxable year if either:

        at least 75% of its gross income for such year is passive income (such as interest, dividends, rents and royalties (other than rents or royalties derived from the active conduct of a trade or business) and gains from the disposition of assets giving rise to passive income); or

        at least 50% of the value of its assets (based on an average of the quarterly values of the assets) during such year is attributable to assets that produce passive income or are held for the production of passive income.

For this purpose, Cellebrite will be treated as owning its proportionate share of the assets and earning its proportionate share of the income of any other entity treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes in which Cellebrite own, directly or indirectly, 25% or more (by value) of the stock.

Cellebrite’s status as a PFIC will depend on the nature and composition of its income and the nature, composition and value of its assets from time to time. The 50% passive asset test described above is generally based on the fair market value of each asset. If Cellebrite is a “controlled foreign corporation” within the meaning of Section 957(a) of the Code (determined by disregarding certain downward attribution rules) (“CFC”) and not publicly traded for the relevant taxable year, however, the test will be applied based on the adjusted basis of Cellebrite’s assets.

Treasury Regulations adopted in 2021, or the New Regulations, modify certain of the rules described above. Such modifications include, for example, permitting asset value to be determined more frequently than on a quarterly basis and treating a non-U.S. corporation as publicly traded for a taxable year if the stock of such corporation is publicly traded, other than in de minimis quantities, for at least twenty trading days during such taxable year.

The New Regulations generally apply to taxable years of shareholders beginning on or after January 14, 2021. A shareholder, however, may choose to apply such rules for any open taxable year beginning before January 14, 2021, provided that, with respect to a non-U.S. corporation being tested for PFIC status, the shareholder consistently applies certain of the provisions of the New Regulations and certain other Treasury Regulations for such year and all subsequent years. Investors who are U.S. Holders should consult their own tax advisors regarding the impact and applicability of the New Regulations.

Cellebrite expects that it would be considered “publicly traded” for the 2021 taxable year because its stock was publicly traded, other than in de minimis quantities, for at least twenty days during the 2021 taxable year. Therefore, Cellebrite will apply the 50% passive asset test using the fair market value of its assets. This determination, however, is subject to uncertainty. In addition, Cellebrite’s status may depend, in part, on how quickly it utilizes its cash on-hand and cash from future financings in its business.

Based on the foregoing, with respect to the past 2021 taxable year, Cellebrite believes that it was not a PFIC (based in part on its belief that it was not classified as a CFC in the past taxable year) and presently does not anticipate that it will be a PFIC based upon the value of its assets, including any goodwill, and the nature and composition of its income and assets.

Nevertheless, whether Cellebrite is treated as a PFIC is determined on an annual basis. As discussed above, the determination of whether a non-U.S. corporation is a PFIC is a factual determination that depends on, among other things, the composition of Cellebrite’s income and assets, and the market value of its shares and assets, including the composition of income and assets and the market value of shares and assets of its subsidiaries, from time to time, and

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thus the determination can only be made annually after the close of each taxable year. Thus, no assurance can be given as to whether Cellebrite will be a PFIC in 2022 or for any future taxable year. In addition, Cellebrite’s U.S. counsel expresses no opinion with respect to Cellebrite’s PFIC status for 2021, 2022 or future taxable years.

Under the PFIC rules, if Cellebrite were considered a PFIC at any time that a U.S. Holder owns Ordinary Shares or Warrants, Cellebrite would continue to be treated as a PFIC with respect to such holder unless (i) Cellebrite ceased to be a PFIC and (ii) (a) the U.S. Holder has made a valid QEF (as described below) election for the first taxable year in which the holder owned such holder’s Ordinary Shares in which Cellebrite was a PFIC, (b) a valid mark-to-market election (as described below) is in effect for the particular year, or (c) the U.S. Holder has made a “deemed sale” election under the PFIC rules. If such a “deemed sale” election is made, a U.S. Holder will be deemed to have sold its Ordinary Shares at their fair market value on the last day of the last taxable year in which Cellebrite is classified as a PFIC, and any gain from such deemed sale would be subject to the consequences described below. After the “deemed sale” election, the Ordinary Shares with respect to which the “deemed sale” election was made will not be treated as shares in a PFIC unless Cellebrite subsequently becomes a PFIC.

For each taxable year that Cellebrite is treated as a PFIC with respect to a U.S. Holder’s Ordinary Shares or Warrants, the U.S. Holder will be subject to special tax rules with respect to any “excess distribution” (as defined below) received and any gain realized from a sale or disposition (including a pledge and transfers of Ordinary Shares or Warrants that would otherwise qualify as nonrecognition transactions for U.S. federal income tax purposes) of its Ordinary Shares or Warrants (collectively the “excess distribution rules”), unless, with respect to the Ordinary Shares, the U.S. Holder makes a valid QEF or mark-to-market election as discussed below. Generally, distributions received by a U.S. Holder in a taxable year that are greater than 125% of the average annual distributions received by such U.S. Holder during the shorter of the three preceding taxable years or the portion of such U.S. Holder’s holding period for the Ordinary Shares or Warrants that preceded the taxable year of the distribution will be treated as excess distributions. Under these special tax rules:

        the excess distribution or gain will be allocated ratably over the U.S. Holder’s holding period for the Ordinary Shares or Warrants;

        the amount allocated to the U.S. Holder’s taxable year in which the U.S. Holder recognized the gain or received the excess distribution or to the period in the U.S. Holder’s holding period before the first day of

Cellebrite’s first taxable year in which Cellebrite is a PFIC, will be treated as ordinary income;

        the amount allocated to each other taxable year (or portions thereof) of the U.S. Holder and included in its holding period will be subject to the highest tax rate in effect for individuals or corporations, as applicable, for each such year without regard to the U.S. Holder’s other items of income and loss for such year; and

        the interest charge generally applicable to underpayments of tax will be imposed on the U.S. Holder with respect to the resulting tax attributable to each such year.

Under the excess distribution rules, the tax liability for amounts allocated to taxable years prior to the year of disposition or excess distribution cannot be offset by any net operating losses, and gains (but not losses) realized on the sale of the Ordinary Shares or Warrants cannot be treated as capital gains, even though the U.S. Holder holds the Ordinary Shares or Warrants as capital assets.

Certain of the PFIC rules may impact U.S. Holders with respect equity interests in subsidiaries and other entities which Cellebrite may hold, directly or indirectly, that are PFICs (collectively, “Lower-Tier PFICs”). There can be no assurance, however, that Cellebrite does not own, or will not in the future acquire, an interest in a subsidiary or other entity that is or would be treated as a Lower-Tier PFIC. U.S. Holders should consult their tax advisors regarding the application of the PFIC rules to any of Cellebrite’s subsidiaries.

If Cellebrite is a PFIC, a U.S. Holder of shares in Cellebrite may avoid taxation under the excess distribution rules described above in respect to the Ordinary Shares by making a timely and valid “qualified electing fund” (“QEF”) election (if eligible to do so). However, a U.S. Holder may make a QEF election with respect to its Ordinary Shares only if Cellebrite provides U.S. Holders on an annual basis with certain financial information specified under applicable U.S. Treasury regulations, including the information provided in a PFIC Annual Information Statement. If Cellebrite determines that it is a PFIC for any taxable year, Cellebrite may decide at that time to provide U.S. Holders with the required information on an annual basis to allow U.S. Holders to make a QEF election with respect to the

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Ordinary Shares. There can be no assurance, however, that Cellebrite will have timely knowledge of its status as a PFIC in the future or that Cellebrite will timely provide such information for such years. The failure to provide such information on an annual basis could prevent a U.S. Holder from making a QEF election or result in the invalidation or termination of a U.S. Holder’s prior QEF election.

A U.S. Holder that makes a QEF election with respect to its Ordinary Shares would generally be required to include in income for each year that Cellebrite is treated as a PFIC the U.S. Holder’s pro rata share of Cellebrite’s ordinary earnings for the year (which would be subject to tax as ordinary income) and net capital gains for the year (which would be subject to tax at the rates applicable to long-term capital gains), without regard to the amount of any distributions made in respect of the Ordinary Shares. Any net deficits or net capital losses of Cellebrite for a taxable year, however, would not be passed through and included on the tax return of the U.S. Holder. A U.S. Holder’s basis in the Ordinary Shares would be increased by the amount of income inclusions under the QEF rules. Dividends actually paid on the Ordinary Shares generally would not be subject to U.S. federal income tax to the extent of prior income inclusions and would reduce the U.S. Holder’s basis in the Ordinary Shares by a corresponding amount. If Cellebrite owns any interests in a Lower-Tier PFIC, a U.S. Holder generally must make a separate QEF election for each Lower-Tier PFIC, subject to Cellebrite’s providing the relevant tax information for each Lower-Tier PFIC on an annual basis. There can be no assurance that Cellebrite will have timely knowledge of the status of any such Lower-Tier PFIC. In addition, Cellebrite may not hold a controlling interest in any such Lower-Tier PFIC and thus there can be no assurance Cellebrite will be able to cause the Lower-Tier PFIC to provide such required information.

If a U.S. Holder does not make a QEF election (or a mark-to-market election, as discussed below) effective from the first taxable year of a U.S. Holder’s holding period for the Ordinary Shares in which Cellebrite is a PFIC, then the Ordinary Shares will generally continue to be treated as an interest in a PFIC, and the U.S. Holder generally will remain subject to the excess distribution rules. A U.S. Holder that first makes a QEF election in a later year may avoid the continued application of the excess distribution rules to its Ordinary Shares by making a “deemed sale” election. In that case, the U.S. Holder will be deemed to have sold the Ordinary Shares at their fair market value on the first day of the taxable year in which the QEF election becomes effective, and any gain from such deemed sale would be subject to the excess distribution rules described above. As a result of the “deemed sale” election, the U.S. Holder will have additional basis (to the extent of any gain recognized on the deemed sale) and, solely for purposes of the PFIC rules, a new holding period for the Ordinary Shares.

It is not entirely clear how various aspects of the PFIC rules apply to the warrants. However, a U.S. Holder may not make a QEF election with respect to its Warrants. As a result, if a U.S. Holder sells or otherwise disposes of such warrants (other than upon exercise of such warrants) and Cellebrite was a PFIC at any time during the U.S. Holder’s holding period of such warrants, any gain recognized generally will be treated as an excess distribution, taxed as described above. If a U.S. Holder that exercises such warrants properly makes and maintains a QEF election with respect to the newly acquired Ordinary Shares (or has previously made a QEF election with respect to the Ordinary Shares), the QEF election will apply to the newly acquired Ordinary Shares. Notwithstanding such QEF election, the rules relating to “excess distributions” discussed above, adjusted to take into account the current income inclusions resulting from the QEF election, will continue to apply with respect to such newly acquired Ordinary Shares (which, while not entirely clear, generally will be deemed to have a holding period for purposes of the PFIC rules that includes the period the U.S. Holder held the Warrants), unless the U.S. Holder makes a “deemed sale” election under the PFIC rules. U.S. Holders are urged to consult their tax advisors as to the application of the rules governing “deemed sale” elections to their particular circumstances.

The QEF election is made on a shareholder-by-shareholder basis and, once made, can be revoked only with the consent of the IRS. A U.S. Holder that is eligible to make a QEF election with respect to its Ordinary Shares generally may do so by providing the appropriate information to the IRS in the U.S. Holder’s timely filed tax return for the year in which the election becomes effective. Retroactive QEF elections generally may be made only by filing a protective statement with such return and if certain other conditions are met or with the consent of the IRS. U.S. Holders should consult their tax advisors regarding the availability and tax consequences of a retroactive QEF election under their particular circumstances.

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U.S. Holders should consult their tax advisors as to the availability and desirability of a QEF election.

Alternatively, if Cellebrite is a PFIC and the Ordinary Shares constitute “marketable stock” (as defined below), a U.S. Holder may make a mark-to-market election for its Ordinary Shares with respect to such shares for the first taxable year in which it holds (or is deemed to hold) the Ordinary Shares and each subsequent taxable year to elect out of the excess distribution rules discussed above. If a U.S. Holder makes a mark-to-market election with respect to its Ordinary Shares, such U.S. Holder generally will include in income for each year that Cellebrite is treated as a PFIC with respect to such Ordinary Shares an amount equal to the excess, if any, of the fair market value of the Ordinary Shares as of the close of the U.S. Holder’s taxable year over the adjusted basis in the Ordinary Shares. A U.S. Holder will be allowed a deduction for the excess, if any, of the adjusted basis of the Ordinary Shares over their fair market value as of the close of the taxable year. However, deductions will be allowed only to the extent of any net mark-to-market gains on the Ordinary Shares included in the U.S. Holder’s income for prior taxable years. Amounts included in income under a mark-to-market election, as well as gain on the actual sale or other disposition of the Ordinary Shares, will be treated as ordinary income. Ordinary loss treatment will also apply to the deductible portion of any mark-to-market loss on the Ordinary Shares, as well as to any loss realized on the actual sale or disposition of the Ordinary Shares, to the extent the amount of such loss does not exceed the net mark-to-market gains for such Ordinary Shares previously included in income. A U.S. Holder’s basis in the Ordinary Shares will be adjusted to reflect any mark-to-market income or loss. If a U.S. Holder makes a mark-to-market election, any distributions Cellebrite makes would generally be subject to the rules discussed above under “— Distributions on Ordinary Shares,” except the lower rates applicable to qualified dividend income would not apply. Currently, U.S. Holders of Warrants will not be able to make a mark-to-market election with respect to their Warrants.

The mark-to-market election is available only for “marketable stock,” which is stock that is regularly traded on a qualified exchange or other market, as defined in applicable U.S. Treasury regulations. The Ordinary Shares, which are listed on Nasdaq, are expected to qualify as marketable stock for purposes of the PFIC rules, but there can be no assurance that Ordinary Shares will be “regularly traded” for purposes of these rules. If made, a mark-to-market election would be effective for the taxable year for which the election was made and for all subsequent taxable years unless Ordinary Shares cease to qualify as “marketable stock” for purposes of the PFIC rules or the IRS consents to the revocation of the election. Because a mark-to-market election cannot be made for equity interests in any Lower-Tier PFICs, a U.S. Holder that does not make the applicable QEF elections generally will continue to be subject to the excess distribution rules with respect to its indirect interest in any Lower-Tier PFICs as described above, even if a mark-to-market election is made for Ordinary Shares.

If a U.S. Holder does not make a mark-to-market election (or a QEF election, as discussed above) effective from the first taxable year of a U.S. Holder’s holding period for the Ordinary Shares in which Cellebrite is a PFIC, then the U.S. Holder generally will remain subject to the excess distribution rules. A U.S. Holder that first makes a mark-to-market election with respect to the Ordinary Shares in a later year will continue to be subject to the excess distribution rules during the taxable year for which the mark-to-market election becomes effective, including with respect to any mark-to-market gain recognized at the end of that year. In subsequent years for which a valid mark-to-mark election remains in effect, the excess distribution rules generally will not apply. A U.S. Holder that is eligible to make a mark-to-market with respect to its Ordinary Shares may do so by providing the appropriate information on IRS Form 8621 and timely filing that form with the U.S. Holder’s tax return for the year in which the election becomes effective.

U.S. Holders should consult their tax advisors as to the availability and desirability of a mark-to-market election, as well as the impact of such election on interests in any Lower-Tier PFICs.

A U.S. Holder of a PFIC may be required to file an IRS Form 8621 on an annual basis and to provide such other information as may be required by the U.S. Treasury Department. Failure to do so, if required, will extend the statute of limitations applicable to such U.S. Holder until such required information is furnished to the IRS. U.S. Holders should consult their tax advisors regarding any reporting requirements that may apply to them if Cellebrite is a PFIC.

The rules dealing with PFICs and with the QEF, “deemed sale,” and mark-to-market elections are very complex and are affected by various factors in addition to those described above. U.S. Holders are strongly encouraged to consult their tax advisors regarding the application of the PFIC rules to their particular circumstances.

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Non-U.S. Holders

The section applies to Non-U.S. Holders of Ordinary Shares and Warrants. For purposes of this discussion, a Non-U.S. Holder means a beneficial owner (other than a partnership or an entity or arrangement so characterized for U.S. federal income tax purposes) of Ordinary Shares or Warrants that is for U.S. federal income tax purposes not a U.S. Holder, including:

        a nonresident alien individual, other than certain former citizens and residents of the United States subject to U.S. tax as expatriates;

        a foreign corporation; or

        a foreign estate or trust;

but generally does not include a beneficial owner who has been or is engaged in the conduct of a trade or business within the U.S. or an individual an individual who is present in the United States for 183 days or more in the taxable year of the disposition of Ordinary Shares or Warrants (except to the extent discussed below). If you are such an individual, you should consult your tax advisor regarding the U.S. federal income tax consequences of the ownership and disposition of Ordinary Shares or Warrants.

U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Ownership and Disposition of Ordinary Shares and Warrants to Non-U.S. Holders

Subject to the discussion below concerning backup withholding, any (i) dividends of cash or property (including constructive distributions treated as dividends as further described under the heading “U.S. Holders — U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Ownership and Disposition of Ordinary Shares and Warrants to U.S. Holders — Possible Constructive Distributions”) paid or deemed paid to a Non-U.S. Holder in respect of Ordinary Shares or (ii) gain realized upon the sale or other taxable disposition of Ordinary Shares and/or Warrants by a Non-U.S. Holder generally will not be subject to U.S. federal income taxation or withholding tax unless:

        the gain or dividend is effectively connected with the Non-U.S. Holder’s conduct of a trade or business within the United States (and, if required by an applicable income tax treaty, the Non-U.S. Holder maintains a permanent establishment or a “fixed base” in the United States to which such gain is attributable); or

        in the case of any gain, the Non-U.S. Holder is a nonresident alien individual present in the United States for 183 days or more during the taxable year of the disposition and certain other requirements are met.

Gain or distributions described in the first bullet point above generally will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on a net income basis at the regular rates. A Non-U.S. Holder that is a corporation also may be subject to a branch profits tax at a rate of 30% (or such lower rate specified by an applicable income tax treaty) on such effectively connected gain, as adjusted for certain items.

Gain described in the second bullet point above will be subject to U.S. federal income tax at a rate of 30% (or such lower rate specified by an applicable income tax treaty), which may be offset by U.S. source capital losses of the Non-U.S. Holder (even though the individual is not considered a resident of the United States), provided the Non-U.S. Holder has timely filed U.S. federal income tax returns with respect to such losses.

The U.S. federal income tax treatment of a Non-U.S. Holder’s exercise of a Warrant, or the lapse of a Warrant held by a Non-U.S. Holder, generally will correspond to the U.S. federal income tax treatment of the exercise or lapse of a Warrant by a U.S. Holder, as described under “U.S. Holders — U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Ownership and Disposition of Ordinary Shares and Warrants to U.S. Holders — Exercise, Lapse or Redemption of a Warrant” above, although to the extent a cashless exercise or lapse results in a taxable exchange, the consequences would be similar to those described in the preceding paragraphs above for a Non-U.S. Holder’s gain on the sale or other disposition of the Ordinary Shares and Warrants.

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The characterization for United States federal income tax purposes of the redemption of the Non-U.S. Holder’s Warrants generally will correspond to the United States federal income tax treatment of such a redemption of a U.S. Holder’s warrants, as described under “U.S. Holders — U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Ownership and Disposition of Ordinary Shares and Warrants to U.S. Holders — Exercise, Lapse or Redemption of a Warrants” above, and the consequences of the redemption to the Non-U.S. Holder will be as described in the paragraphs above under the heading “— U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Ownership and Disposition of Ordinary Shares and Warrants to Non-U.S. Holders” based on such characterization.

Information Reporting and Backup Withholding

Information reporting requirements may apply to dividends received by U.S. Holders of Ordinary Shares, and the proceeds received on the disposition of Ordinary Shares effected within the U.S. (and, in certain cases, outside the U.S.), in each case other than U.S. Holders that are exempt recipients (such as corporations). Backup withholding (currently at a rate of 24%) may apply to such amounts if the U.S. Holder fails to provide an accurate taxpayer identification number (generally on an IRS Form W-9 provided to the paying agent of the U.S. Holder’s broker) or is otherwise subject to backup withholding. Any redemptions treated as dividend payments with respect to Ordinary Shares and proceeds from the sale, exchange, redemption or other disposition of Ordinary Shares may be subject to information reporting to the IRS and possible U.S. backup withholding. U.S. Holders should consult their tax advisors regarding the application of the U.S. information reporting and backup withholding rules.

Information returns may be required to be filed with the IRS in connection with, and Non-U.S. Holders may be subject to backup withholding on amounts received in respect of, a Non-U.S. Holder’s disposition of their Ordinary Shares, unless the Non-U.S. Holder furnishes to the applicable withholding agent the required certification as to its non-U.S. status, such as by providing a valid IRS Form W-8BEN, IRS Form W-8BEN-E or IRS Form W-8ECI, as applicable, or the Non-U.S. Holder otherwise establishes an exemption. Dividends paid with respect to Ordinary Shares and proceeds from the sale of other disposition of Ordinary Shares received in the U.S. by a Non-U.S. Holder through certain U.S.-related financial intermediaries may be subject to information reporting and backup withholding unless such Non-U.S. Holder provides proof of an applicable exemption or complies with certain certification procedures described above, and otherwise complies with the applicable requirements of the backup withholding rules.

Backup withholding is not an additional tax. Amounts withheld as backup withholding may be credited against the taxpayer’s U.S. federal income tax liability, and a taxpayer may obtain a refund of any excess amounts withheld under the backup withholding rules by timely filing the appropriate claim for a refund with the IRS and furnishing any required information.

Additionally, certain U.S. Holders that hold an interest in “specified foreign financial assets” (which may include the Ordinary Shares) are required to report information relating to such assets on IRS Form 8938, subject to certain exceptions. Penalties can apply if U.S. Holders fail to satisfy such reporting requirements. U.S. Holders should consult their tax advisors regarding the applicability of these requirements to their acquisition and ownership of the Ordinary Shares.

THE U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX DISCUSSION SET FORTH ABOVE IS INCLUDED FOR GENERAL INFORMATION ONLY AND MAY NOT BE APPLICABLE TO YOU DEPENDING UPON YOUR PARTICULAR SITUATION. YOU ARE URGED TO CONSULT YOUR OWN TAX ADVISOR WITH RESPECT TO THE TAX CONSEQUENCES TO YOU OF THE OWNERSHIP AND DISPOSITION OF ORDINARY SHARES AND WARRANTS, AS APPLICABLE, INCLUDING THE TAX CONSEQUENCES UNDER STATE, LOCAL, FOREIGN AND OTHER TAX LAWS AND TAX TREATIES AND THE POSSIBLE EFFECTS OF CHANGES IN U.S. OR OTHER TAX LAWS.

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CERTAIN MATERIAL ISRAELI TAX CONSIDERATIONS

The following description is not intended to constitute a complete analysis of all tax consequences relating to the acquisition, ownership and disposition of the Ordinary Shares. You should consult your own tax advisor concerning the tax consequences of your particular situation, as well as any tax consequences that may arise under the laws of any state, local, foreign or other taxing jurisdiction.

Israeli tax considerations

The following is a brief summary of the material Israeli tax laws applicable to Cellebrite, and certain Israeli Government programs that benefit Cellebrite. This section also contains a discussion of material Israeli tax consequences concerning the ownership and disposition of Ordinary Shares purchased by investors. This summary does not discuss all the aspects of Israeli tax law that may be relevant to a particular investor in light of his or her personal investment circumstances or to some types of investors subject to special treatment under Israeli law. Examples of such investors include residents of Israel or traders in securities, trusts or foundations, partnerships, controlled foreign corporations and any other type of taxpayer that are subject to special tax regimes not covered in this discussion. To the extent that the discussion is based on new tax legislation that has not yet been subject to judicial or administrative interpretation, Cellebrite cannot assure you that the appropriate tax authorities or the courts will accept the views expressed in this discussion. The discussion below is subject to change, including due to amendments under Israeli law or changes to the applicable judicial or administrative interpretations of Israeli law, which change could affect the tax consequences described below.

General corporate tax structure in Israel

Israeli companies are generally subject to the ordinary corporate tax. In December 2016, the Israeli Parliament approved the Economic Efficiency Law (Legislative Amendments for Applying the Economic Policy for the 2017 and 2018 Budget Years) which reduces the corporate income tax rate from 25% to 24% effective from January 1, 2017, and to 23% effective from January 1, 2018. However, the effective tax rate payable by a company that derives income from an Approved Enterprise, a Preferred Enterprise, a Beneficiary Enterprise or a Technological Enterprise (as discussed below) may be considerably less. Capital gains derived by an Israeli company are generally subject to the ordinary corporate tax rate.

Law for the Encouragement of Industry (Taxes), 5729-1969

The Law for the Encouragement of Industry (Taxes), 5729-1969, generally referred to as the Industry Encouragement Law, provides several tax benefits for “Industrial Companies.” We believe that we currently qualify as an Industrial Company within the meaning of the Industry Encouragement Law.

The Industry Encouragement Law defines an “Industrial Company” as an Israeli resident-company, of which 90% or more of its income in any tax year, other than income from certain defense loans, is derived from an “Industrial Enterprise” owned by it and located in Israel or in the “Area”, in accordance with the definition under section 3A of the Israeli Income Tax Ordinance (New Version) 1961, or the Ordinance. An “Industrial Enterprise” is defined as an enterprise whose principal activity in a given tax year is industrial production.

Following are the main tax benefits available to Industrial Companies:

        Amortization of the cost of purchased patent, rights to use a patent, and know-how, which are used for the development or advancement of the Industrial Enterprise, over an eight-year period, commencing on the year in which such rights were first exercised;

        Under limited conditions, an election to file consolidated tax returns with controlled Israeli Industrial Companies; and

        Expenses related to a public offering are deductible in equal amounts over three years commencing on the year of the offering.

Eligibility for benefits under the Industry Encouragement Law is not contingent upon approval of any governmental authority.

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Tax benefits and grants for research and development

Israeli tax law allows, under certain conditions, a tax deduction for expenditures, including capital expenditures, related to scientific research and development for the year in which they are incurred. Expenditures are deemed related to scientific research and development projects, if:

        The expenditures are approved by the relevant Israeli government ministry, determined by the field of research;

        The research and development must be for the promotion of the company; and

        The research and development is carried out by or on behalf of the company seeking such tax deduction.

The amount of such deductible expenses is reduced by the sum of any funds received through government grants for the finance of such scientific research and development projects. No deduction under these research and development deduction rules is allowed if such deduction is related to an expense invested in an asset depreciable under the general depreciation rules of the Ordinance. Expenditures that are unqualified under the conditions above are deductible in equal amounts over three years.

From time to time, we may apply to the Israel Innovation Authority for approval to allow a tax deduction for all or most of research and development expenses during the year incurred. There can be no assurance that such application will be accepted. If we will not be able to deduct research and development expenses during the year of the payment, we will be able to deduct research and development expenses, in equal installments, during a period of three years commencing in the year of the payment of such expenses. Accordingly the Cellebrite had obtained an approval from the Israel Innovation Authority for 2018 and submitted a request for 2019.

Law for the Encouragement of Capital Investments, 5719-1959

The Law for the Encouragement of Capital Investments, 5719-1959, generally referred to as the Investment Law, provides certain eligible companies with incentives for capital investments in production facilities (or other eligible assets) and certain tax benefits with respect to certain eligible income.

The Investment Law was significantly amended effective as of April 1, 2005 (the “2005 Amendment”), as of January 1, 2011 (the “2011 Amendment”) and as of January 1, 2017 (the “2017 Amendment”). Pursuant to the 2005 Amendment, tax benefits granted in accordance with the provisions of the Investment Law prior to its revision by the 2005 Amendment remain in force but any benefits granted subsequently are subject to the provisions of the amended Investment Law. Similarly, the 2011 Amendment introduced new benefits to replace those granted in accordance with the provisions of the Investment Law in effect prior to the 2011 Amendment. However, companies entitled to benefits under the Investment Law as in effect prior to January 1, 2011 were entitled to choose to continue to enjoy such benefits, provided that certain conditions are met, or elect instead, irrevocably, to forego such benefits and have the benefits of the 2011 Amendment apply. The 2017 Amendment introduces new benefits for Technological Enterprises, alongside the existing tax benefits.

The following discussion is a summary of the Investment Law following its most recent amendments:

Tax Benefits Subsequent to the 2005 Amendment

The 2005 Amendment applies to new investment programs and investment programs commencing after 2004 but does not apply to investment programs approved prior to April 1, 2005, referred to as an Approved Enterprise. The 2005 Amendment provides that terms and benefits included in any certificate of approval that was granted before the 2005 Amendment became effective (April 1, 2005) will remain subject to the provisions of the Investment Law as in effect on the date of such approval. Pursuant to the 2005 Amendment, the Israeli Authority for Investments and Development of the Industry and Economy, or the Investment Center, will continue to grant Approved Enterprise status to qualifying investments. The 2005 Amendment, however, limits the scope of enterprises that may be approved by the Investment Center by setting criteria for the approval of a facility as an Approved Enterprise.

The 2005 Amendment provides that Approved Enterprise status will only be necessary for receiving cash grants. As a result, it was no longer necessary for a company to obtain the advance approval of the Investment Center in order to receive the tax benefits previously available under the alternative benefits track. Instead, a company may claim the tax benefits offered by the Investment Law directly in its tax returns, provided that its facilities meet the criteria for

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tax benefits set forth in the 2005 Amendment. Companies or programs under the new provisions receiving these tax benefits are referred to as Beneficiary Enterprises. A company that has a Beneficiary Enterprise may, at its discretion, approach the Israel Tax Authority for a pre-ruling confirming that it is in compliance with the provisions of the Investment Law, as amended.

Tax benefits are available under the 2005 Amendment to production facilities (or other eligible facilities) which are generally required to derive more than 25% of their business income from export to specific markets with a population of at least 14 million in 2012 (such export criteria will further be increased in the future by 1.4% per annum). In order to receive the tax benefits, the 2005 Amendment states that a company must make an investment which meets certain conditions set forth in the 2005 Amendment for tax benefits, including exceeding a minimum investment amount specified in the Investment Law. Such investment entitles a company to receive a “Beneficiary Enterprise” status with respect to the investment, and may be made over a period of no more than three years ending in the year in which the company requested to have the tax benefits apply to its Beneficiary Enterprise. Where a company requests to have the tax benefits apply to an expansion of existing facilities, only the expansion will be considered to be a Beneficiary Enterprise and the company’s effective tax rate will be the weighted average of the applicable rates. In such case, the minimum investment required in order to qualify as a Beneficiary Enterprise must exceed a certain percentage of the value of the company’s production assets before the expansion.

The extent of the tax benefits available under the 2005 Amendment to qualifying income of a Beneficiary Enterprise depends on, among other things, the geographic location within Israel of the Beneficiary Enterprise. The location will also determine the period for which tax benefits are available. Such tax benefits include an exemption from corporate tax on undistributed income for a period of between two to ten years, depending on the geographic location of the Beneficiary Enterprise within Israel, and a reduced corporate tax rate of between 10% to 25% for the remainder of the benefits period, depending on the level of foreign investment in the company in each year. The benefits period is limited to 12 starting from the year in which the company first chose to have the tax benefits apply (14 years if the Beneficiary Enterprise relates to the establishment of a new enterprise in priority Zone A) (the “Election Year”).

A company qualifying for tax benefits under the 2005 Amendment which pays a dividend out of income derived by its Beneficiary Enterprise during the tax exemption period will be subject to deferred corporate tax in respect of the gross amount of the dividend distributed (grossed-up to reflect the pre-tax income that it would have had to earn in order to distribute the dividend) at the corporate tax rate which would have otherwise been applicable. Certain transactions will be considered as a deemed distribution of dividends for the purposes of the claw-back of corporate tax, including certain payments made, whether directly or indirectly, to certain related parties or controlling shareholders (including entities controlled by such controlling shareholders), payments in liquidation and consideration paid to shareholders in a buyback of shares. We have filed an application with the Israel Tax Authority to receive the Transaction Tax Ruling to determine, inter alia, the amount of claw-back of Israeli corporate income tax, if any, that we will be required to pay with respect to the distribution of the Additional Dividend out of income derived by our Benefitted Enterprise.

Dividends paid out of income attributed to a Beneficiary Enterprise (or out of dividends received from a company whose income is attributed to a Beneficiary Enterprise) are generally subject to withholding tax at source at the rate of 15% (or 20% with respect to income generated by the distributing company during a tax benefits period that began in an Election Year after 2013) or such lower rate as may be provided in an applicable tax treaty (subject to the receipt in advance of a valid certificate from the Israel Tax Authority allowing for a reduced tax rate). The reduced rate of 15% or 20% is limited to dividends and distributions out of income derived during the benefits period and actually paid at any time up to 12 years thereafter. After this period, the withholding tax is applied at a rate of up to 30%, or at a lower rate under an applicable tax treaty (subject to the receipt in advance of a valid certificate from the Israel Tax Authority allowing for a reduced tax rate). In the case of a Foreign Investors’ Company (as such term is defined in the Investment Law), the 12-year limitation on reduced withholding tax on dividends does not apply.

The benefits available to a Beneficiary Enterprise are subject to the fulfillment of conditions stipulated in the Investment Law and its regulations. If a company does not meet these conditions, it would be required to refund the amount of tax benefits, as adjusted by the Israeli consumer price index, and interest, or other monetary penalties.

Tax benefits under the 2011 amendment

The 2011 Amendment canceled the availability of the benefits granted to Industrial Companies under the Investment Law prior to 2011 and, instead, introduced new benefits for income generated by a “Preferred Company” through its “Preferred Enterprise” (as such terms are defined in the Investment Law) as of January 1, 2011. The definition of a

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Preferred Company includes a company incorporated in Israel that is not fully owned by a governmental entity, and that has, among other things, Preferred Enterprise status and is controlled and managed from Israel. Pursuant to the 2011 Amendment, a Preferred Company is entitled to a reduced corporate tax rate of 15% with respect to its income derived by its Preferred Enterprise in 2011 and 2012, unless the Preferred Enterprise is located in a specified development zone, in which case the rate will be 10%. Under the 2011 Amendment, such corporate tax rate was reduced from 15% and 10%, respectively, to 12.5% and 7%, respectively, in 2013, 16% and 9% respectively, in 2014, 2015 and 2016, and 16% and 7.5%, respectively, in 2017 and thereafter. Income derived by a Preferred Company from a “Special Preferred Enterprise” (as such term is defined in the Investment Law) would be entitled, during a benefits period of 10 years, to further reduced tax rates of 8%, or 5% if the Special Preferred Enterprise is located in a certain development zone.

Dividends distributed from income which is attributed to a “Preferred Enterprise” will be subject to withholding tax at source at the following rates: (i) Israeli resident corporations — 0%, (although, if such dividends are subsequently distributed to individuals or a non-Israeli company the below rates detailed in sub sections (ii) and (iii) shall apply) (ii) Israeli resident individuals — 20% (iii) non-Israeli residents (individuals and corporations) — 20%, subject to a reduced tax rate under the provisions of any applicable double tax treaty (subject to the receipt in advance of a valid certificate from the Israel Tax Authority allowing for a reduced tax rate).

The 2011 Amendment also provided transitional provisions to address companies already enjoying existing tax benefits under the Investment Law. These transitional provisions provide, among other things, that unless an irrevocable request is made to apply the provisions of the Investment Law as amended in 2011 with respect to income to be derived as of January 1, 2011, a Beneficiary Enterprise can elect to continue to benefit from the benefits provided to it before the 2011 Amendment came into effect, provided that certain conditions are met.

In May 2019, we filed a notification that Cellebrite wishes to apply the new benefits under the 2011 Amendment. Accordingly, we are not entitled to Beneficiary Enterprise tax benefits as of January 1, 2019, however certain other provisions described above with respect to the distribution or payment out of income that was previously earned under the Beneficiary Enterprise regime may still apply.

New tax benefits under the 2017 amendment that became effective on January 1, 2017

The 2017 Amendment was enacted as part of the Economic Efficiency Law that was published on December 29, 2016, and is effective as of January 1, 2017. The 2017 Amendment provides new tax benefits for two types of “Technological Enterprises,” as described below, and is in addition to the other existing tax beneficial programs under the Investment Law.

The 2017 Amendment provides that a Preferred Company satisfying certain conditions will qualify as a “Preferred Technological Enterprise” and will thereby enjoy a reduced corporate tax rate of 12% on income that qualifies as “Preferred Technology Income,” as defined in the Investment Law. The tax rate is further reduced to 7.5% for a Preferred Technological Enterprise located in development zone “A.” In addition, a Preferred Technological Enterprise will enjoy a reduced corporate tax rate of 12% on capital gain derived from the sale of certain “Benefitted Intangible Assets” (as defined in the Investment Law) to a related foreign company if the Benefitted Intangible Assets were acquired from a foreign company on or after January 1, 2017 for at least NIS 200 million, and the sale receives prior approval from the Israel Innovation Authority.

The 2017 Amendment further provides that a Preferred Company satisfying certain conditions (group-consolidated revenues of at least NIS 10 billion) will qualify as a “Special Preferred Technological Enterprise” and will thereby enjoy a reduced corporate tax rate of 6% on “Preferred Technological Income” regardless of the company’s geographic location within Israel. In addition, a Special Preferred Technological Enterprise will enjoy a reduced corporate tax rate of 6% on capital gain derived from the sale of certain “Benefitted Intangible Assets” to a related foreign company if the Benefitted Intangible Assets were either developed by the Special Preferred Enterprise or acquired from a foreign company on or after January 1, 2017, and the sale received prior approval from the Israel Innovation Authority. A Special Preferred Technological Enterprise that acquires Benefitted Intangible Assets from a foreign company for more than NIS 500 million will be eligible for these benefits for at least ten years, subject to certain approvals as specified in the Investment Law.

Dividends distributed by a Preferred Technological Enterprise or a Special Preferred Technological Enterprise, paid out of Preferred Technological Income, are generally subject to withholding tax at source at the rate of 20% or such lower rate as may be provided in an applicable tax treaty (subject to the receipt in advance of a valid certificate from the Israel Tax Authority allowing for a reduced tax rate). However, if such dividends are paid to an Israeli company,

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no tax is required to be withheld. If such dividends are distributed to a foreign company that holds solely or together with other foreign companies 90% or more in the Israeli company and other conditions are met, the withholding tax rate will be 4%. Please note that the reduced withholding tax rate of 4% will apply only on profits generated after the Preferred Technological Enterprise was acquired by a foreign company.

We believe that Cellebrite is eligible to the tax benefits under the 2017 Amendment as a Preferred Technological Enterprise.

On February 16, 2020 Cellebrite received a Tax Ruling from the Israel Tax Authority regarding its entitlement to tax benefits as a Preferred Technological Enterprise subject to the compliance with the conditions settled in such Tax Ruling and in the Encouragement Law. The Tax Ruling is valid from 2019 until tax year 2023 (inclusive).

From time to time, the Israeli Government has discussed reducing the benefits available to companies under the Investment Law. The termination or substantial reduction of any of the benefits available under the Investment Law could materially increase our tax liabilities.

Taxation of our shareholders

Capital gains taxes applicable to non-Israeli resident shareholders.

Israeli capital gains tax is imposed on the disposition of capital assets by a non-Israeli resident if those assets (i) are located in Israel, (ii) are shares or a right to shares in an Israeli resident corporation or (iii) represent, directly or indirectly, rights to assets located in Israel, unless a tax treaty between Israel and the seller’s country of residence provides otherwise. The Israeli tax law distinguishes between “Real Capital Gain” and “Inflationary Surplus.” Inflationary Surplus is a portion of the total capital gain which is equivalent to the increase in the relevant asset’s price that is attributable to the increase in the Israeli Consumer Price Index or, in certain circumstances, a foreign currency exchange rate, between the date of purchase and the date of disposition. Inflationary Surplus is currently not subject to tax in Israel. Real Capital Gain is the excess of the total capital gain over the Inflationary Surplus. Generally, Real Capital Gain accrued by individuals on the sale of Ordinary Shares will be taxed at the rate of 25%. However, if the shareholder is a “substantial shareholder” at the time of sale or at any time during the preceding 12- month period, such gain will be taxed at the rate of 30% (or claims a deduction for interest and linkage differences expenses in connection with the purchase and holding of such). A “substantial shareholder” is generally a person who alone or together with such person’s relative or another person who collaborates with such person with respect to the material matters of the corporation on a permanent basis pursuant to an agreement, holds, directly or indirectly, at least 10% of any of the “means of control” of the corporation. “Means of control” generally include the right to vote, receive profits, nominate a director or an executive officer, receive assets upon liquidation, or order someone who holds any of the aforesaid rights how to act, regardless of the source of such right. Real Capital Gain derived by corporations will be generally subject to a corporate tax rate of 23% (in 2021).

A non-Israeli resident that derives capital gains from the sale of shares in an Israeli resident company that were purchased after the company was listed for trading on a stock exchange outside of Israel, will be exempt from Israeli tax if the gains derived from the sale of shares was not attributed to a permanent establishment that the non-resident maintains in Israel. However, non-Israeli “body of persons” (as defined under the Ordinance, which includes corporate entities, partnerships and other entities) will not be entitled to the foregoing exemption if Israeli residents: (i) hold, whether directly or indirectly, more than 25% of the means of control, as such term is defined above, in such non-Israeli entity or (ii) are the beneficiaries of, or are entitled to, 25% or more of the revenues or profits of such non-Israeli entity, whether directly or indirectly. In addition, such exemption is not applicable to a person whose gains from selling or otherwise disposing of the shares are deemed to be business income.

Additionally, a sale of securities by a non-Israeli resident may be exempt from Israeli capital gains tax under the provisions of an applicable tax treaty. For example, under Convention Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the State of Israel with respect to Taxes on Income, as amended (the “United States Israel Tax Treaty”), the sale, exchange or other disposition of shares by a shareholder who is a United States resident (for purposes of the treaty) holding the shares as a capital asset and is entitled to claim the benefits afforded to such a resident by the U.S. Israel Tax Treaty (a “U.S. Resident”) is generally exempt from Israeli capital gains tax unless: (i) the capital gain arising from such sale, exchange or disposition is attributed to real estate located in Israel; (ii) the capital gain arising from such sale, exchange or disposition is attributed to royalties; (iii) the capital gain arising from the such sale, exchange or disposition is attributed to a permanent establishment in Israel, under certain terms;

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(iv) such U.S. Resident holds, directly or indirectly, shares representing 10% or more of the voting capital during any part of the 12 month period preceding the disposition, subject to certain conditions; or (v) such U.S. Resident is an individual and was present in Israel for 183 days or more during the relevant taxable year. In any such case, the sale, exchange or disposition of such shares would be subject to Israeli tax, to the extent applicable. However, under the United States-Israel Tax Treaty, a Treaty U.S. Resident may be permitted to claim a credit for the Israeli tax against the U.S. federal income tax imposed with respect to the sale, exchange or disposition of the shares, subject to the limitations under U.S. laws applicable to foreign tax credits. The United States-Israel Tax Treaty does not provide such credit against any U.S. state or local taxes.

In some instances where our shareholders may be liable for Israeli tax on the sale of their ordinary shares, the payment of the consideration may be subject to the withholding of Israeli tax at source. Shareholders may be required to demonstrate that they are exempt from tax on their capital gains in order to avoid withholding at source at the time of sale (i.e., resident certificate or other documentation).

Capital gains taxes applicable to Israeli resident shareholders.

An Israeli resident corporation that derives capital gains from the sale of shares in an Israeli resident company that were purchased after the company was listed for trading on a stock exchange outside of Israel will generally be subject to tax on the real capital gains generated on such sale at the corporate tax rate of 23%. An Israeli resident individual will generally be subject to capital gain tax at the rate of 25%. However, if the individual shareholder claims deduction of interest expenditures or is a “substantial shareholder” at the time of the sale or at any time during the preceding twelve months period, such gain will be taxed at the rate of 30%. (or claims a deduction for interest and linkage differences expenses in connection with the purchase and holding of such). Individual holders dealing in securities in Israel for whom the income from the sale of securities is considered “business income” as defined in section 2(1) of the Ordinance are taxed at the marginal tax rates applicable to business income (up to 47% in 2022). Certain Israeli institutions who are exempt from tax under section 9(2) or section 129(C)(a)(1) of the Ordinance (such as exempt trust fund, pension fund) may be exempt from capital gains tax from the sale of the shares.

Taxation of Israeli shareholders on receipt of dividends.

An Israeli resident individual is generally subject to Israeli income tax on the receipt of dividends at the rate of 25%. With respect to a person who is a “substantial shareholder” at the time of receiving the dividend or on any time during the preceding twelve months, the applicable tax rate is 30%. Such dividends are generally subject to Israeli withholding tax at a rate of 25% if the shares are registered with a nominee company (whether the recipient is a substantial shareholder or not), 15% if the dividend is distributed from income attributed to an Approved Enterprise or a Beneficiary Enterprise (if the first year the company requested to have the tax benefits apply was 2012 or before) and 20% if the dividend is distributed from income attributed to a Preferred Enterprise or a Preferred Technological Enterprise. If the recipient of the dividend is an Israeli resident corporation such dividend income will be exempt from tax provided the income from which such dividend is distributed was derived or accrued within Israel and was received directly or indirectly from another corporation that is liable to Israeli corporate tax. An exempt trust fund, pension fund or other entity that is exempt from tax under section 9(2) or section 129(C)(a)(1) of the Israeli Tax Ordinance is exempt from tax on dividend.

Taxation of non-Israeli shareholders on receipt of dividends.

Non-Israeli residents (either individuals or corporations) are generally subject to Israeli income tax on the receipt of dividends at the rate of 25%, which tax will be withheld at source, unless relief is provided in a treaty between Israel and the shareholder’s country of residence. With respect to a person who is a “substantial shareholder” at the time of receiving the dividend or on any time during the preceding twelve months, the applicable tax rate is 30%. Such dividends are generally subject to Israeli withholding tax at a rate of 25% if the shares are registered with a nominee company (whether the recipient is a substantial shareholder or not), 15% if the dividend is distributed from income attributed to an Approved Enterprise or a Beneficiary Enterprise (if the first year the company requested to have the tax benefits apply was 2012 or before), 20% if the dividend is distributed from income attributed to a Preferred Enterprise or a Technological Enterprise, and 4% if the dividend is distributed from income attributed to a Technological Enterprise to a foreign company that holds solely or together with other foreign companies 90% or more in the Israeli company and other conditions are met, (please note that the reduced withholding tax rate of 4% will apply only on profits generated after the Preferred Technological Enterprise was acquired by a foreign company), unless a

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reduced rate is provided under an applicable tax treaty (each, subject to the receipt in advance of a valid certificate from the Israel Tax Authority allowing for a reduced tax rate). For example, under the United States-Israel Tax Treaty, the maximum rate of tax withheld at source in Israel on dividends paid to a holder of our ordinary shares who is a U.S. Resident is 25%. However, the maximum rate of withholding tax on dividends, not generated by an Approved that are paid to a United States corporation holding 10% or more of the outstanding voting capital throughout the tax year in which the dividend is distributed as well as during the previous tax year, is 12.5%, provided that not more than 25% of the gross income for such preceding year consists of certain types of dividends and interest. Notwithstanding the foregoing, dividends distributed from income attributed to an Approved Enterprise are not entitled to such reduced rate under the tax treaty but are subject to a withholding tax rate of 15% for a shareholder that is a U.S. corporation, provided that the condition related to our gross income for the previous year (as set forth in the previous sentence) is met. If the dividend is attributable partly to income derived from an Approved Enterprise, Benefited Enterprise, Preferred Enterprise or a Preferred Technological Enterprise, and partly to other sources of income, the withholding rate will be a blended rate reflecting the relative portions of the two types of income. We cannot assure you that we will designate the profits that we may distribute in a way that will reduce shareholders’ tax liability. Application for the reduced tax rate requires appropriate documentation presented and specific instruction received from the Israeli Tax Authorities to the extent tax is withheld at source at the maximum rates (see above), a qualified tax treaty recipient will be required to comply with certain administrative procedures with the Israeli Tax Authorities in order to receive a refund of the excess tax withheld.

A foreign resident receiving dividend income from an Israeli company, from which the full tax was deducted, will generally be exempt from filing a tax return in Israel with respect to such income, provided that (i) such income was not generated from business conducted in Israel by the taxpayer, (ii) the taxpayer has no other taxable sources of income in Israel with respect to which a tax return is required to be filed, and (iii) the taxpayer is not obligated to pay Surtax (see below) in accordance with section 121B of the Ordinance.

Israeli Tax Withholding.

In addition to all of the above, any payment made by an Israeli resident company may be subject to Israeli withholding tax, regardless of whether the recipient should be subject to Israeli tax with respect to the receipt of such payment, unless the recipient provides the company with a valid certificate issued by the Israel Tax Authority to exempt the recipient from such withholding tax liability.

Surtax.

Subject to the provisions of an applicable tax treaty, individuals who are subject to tax in Israel (whether any such individual is an Israeli resident or non-Israeli resident) are also subject to an additional tax at a rate of 3% on annual income (including, but not limited to, dividends, interest and capital gain) exceeding NIS 663,240 for 2022, which amount is linked to the annual change in the Israeli consumer price index.

Estate and Gift Tax

Israeli law presently does not impose estate or gift taxes.

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PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

The Selling Securityholders, which as used here includes donees, pledgees, transferees or other successors-in-interest selling warrants, ordinary shares or interests in ordinary shares received after the date of this prospectus from a Selling Securityholder as a gift, pledge, partnership distribution or other transfer, may, from time to time, sell, transfer or otherwise dispose of any or all of their warrants, ordinary shares or interests in ordinary shares on any stock exchange, market or trading facility on which the warrants or shares are traded or in private transactions. These dispositions may be at fixed prices, at prevailing market prices at the time of sale, at prices related to the prevailing market price, at varying prices determined at the time of sale, or at negotiated prices.

The Selling Securityholders may use any one or more of the following methods when disposing of warrants, shares or interests therein:

        ordinary brokerage transactions and transactions in which the broker-dealer solicits purchasers;

        block trades in which the broker-dealer will attempt to sell the shares as agent, but may position and resell a portion of the block as principal to facilitate the transaction;

        purchases by a broker-dealer as principal and resale by the broker-dealer for their account;

        an exchange distribution in accordance with the rules of the applicable exchange;

        privately negotiated transactions;

        short sales effected after the date the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part is declared effective by the SEC;

        through the writing or settlement of options or other hedging transactions, whether through an options exchange or otherwise;

        broker-dealers may agree with the Selling Securityholders to sell a specified number of such shares at a stipulated price per share;

        a combination of any such methods of sale; and

        any other method permitted by applicable law.

The Selling Securityholders may, from time to time, pledge or grant a security interest in some or all of the warrants or ordinary shares owned by them and, if they default in the performance of their secured obligations, the pledgees or secured parties may offer and sell the warrants or ordinary shares, from time to time, under this prospectus, or under an amendment to this prospectus under Rule 424(b)(3) or other applicable provision of the Securities Act amending the list of Selling Securityholders to include the pledgee, transferee or other successors in interest as Selling Securityholders under this prospectus. The Selling Securityholders also may transfer the warrants or ordinary shares in other circumstances, in which case the transferees, pledgees or other successors in interest will be the selling beneficial owners for purposes of this prospectus.

In connection with the sale of our warrants, ordinary shares or interests therein, the Selling Securityholders may enter into hedging transactions with broker-dealers or other financial institutions, which may in turn engage in short sales of the warrants or ordinary shares in the course of hedging the positions they assume. The Selling Securityholders may also sell warrants or our ordinary shares short and deliver these securities to close out their short positions, or loan or pledge the warrants or ordinary shares to broker-dealers that in turn may sell these securities. The Selling Securityholders may also enter into option or other transactions with broker-dealers or other financial institutions or the creation of one or more derivative securities which require the delivery to such broker-dealer or other financial institution of warrants or shares offered by this prospectus, which warrants or shares such broker-dealer or other financial institution may resell pursuant to this prospectus (as supplemented or amended to reflect such transaction).

Each of the Selling Securityholders reserves the right to accept and, together with their agents from time to time, to reject, in whole or in part, any proposed purchase of warrants or ordinary shares to be made directly or through agents. We will not receive any of the proceeds from this offering. Upon any exercise of the warrants by payment of cash, however, we will receive the exercise price of the warrants.

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The Selling Securityholders and any underwriters, broker-dealers or agents that participate in the sale of the ordinary shares or interests therein may be “underwriters” within the meaning of Section 2(11) of the Securities Act.

Any discounts, commissions, concessions or profit they earn on any resale of the shares may be underwriting discounts and commissions under the Securities Act. Selling securityholders who are “underwriters” within the meaning of Section 2(11) of the Securities Act will be subject to the prospectus delivery requirements of the Securities Act.

In addition, a Selling Securityholder that is an entity may elect to make a pro rata in-kind distribution of securities to its members, partners or stockholders pursuant to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part by delivering a prospectus with a plan of distribution. Such members, partners or stockholders would thereby receive freely tradeable securities pursuant to the distribution through a registration statement.

To the extent required, the warrants or our ordinary shares to be sold, the names of the Selling Securityholders, the respective purchase prices and public offering prices, the names of any agents, dealer or underwriter, any applicable commissions or discounts with respect to a particular offer will be set forth in an accompanying prospectus supplement or, if appropriate, a post-effective amendment to the registration statement that includes this prospectus.

In order to comply with the securities laws of some states, if applicable, the warrants or ordinary shares may be sold in these jurisdictions only through registered or licensed brokers or dealers. In addition, in some states the warrants or ordinary shares may not be sold unless they have been registered or qualified for sale or an exemption from registration or qualification requirements is available and is complied with.

We have advised the Selling Securityholders that the anti-manipulation rules of Regulation M under the Exchange Act may apply to sales of warrants or shares in the market and to the activities of the Selling Securityholders and their affiliates. In addition, to the extent applicable we will make copies of this prospectus (as it may be supplemented or amended from time to time) available to the Selling Securityholders for the purpose of satisfying the prospectus delivery requirements of the Securities Act. The Selling Securityholders may indemnify any broker-dealer that participates in transactions involving the sale of the shares against certain liabilities, including liabilities arising under the Securities Act.

We have agreed to indemnify the Selling Securityholders against liabilities, including liabilities under the Securities Act and state securities laws, relating to the registration of the warrants or shares offered by this prospectus.

We have agreed with the Selling Securityholders to keep the registration statement of which this prospectus constitutes a part effective until all of the shares covered by this prospectus have been disposed of pursuant to and in accordance with the registration statement or the securities have been withdrawn.

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EXPENSES RELATED TO THE OFFERING

Set forth below is an itemization of the total expenses that are expected to be incurred by us in connection with the offer and sale of the Ordinary Shares and Warrants by the Selling Securityholders. With the exception of the SEC registration fee, all amounts are estimates. Each prospectus supplement describing an offering of securities will reflect the estimated expenses related to the offering of securities under that prospectus supplement.

 

U.S. Dollar

SEC Registration Fee

 

230,929

Legal Fees and Expenses

 

200,000

Accounting Fees and Expenses

 

105,000

Printing Expenses

 

30,000